Ethiopian News, Current Affairs and Opinion Forum


Probably Africa's No.1 Minister of inJustice - Fozia Hashim

Postby sarcasm » 26 Sep 2013, 14:55


Her great achievements cannot be listed in one post, but I will try to list a few:
Eritreans do not have political, religious, individual right to life, liberty, personal security, freedom from torture, freedom from arbitrary arrest and exile, right to fair public hearing etc

Eritrea had a handful prisons in Asmara when Fozia came to power. As a result of her successful endeavor to spread injustice in the whole country, Eritrea currently has many prisons in every sub-region ( Awraja, Wereda and Neus Wereda). Around 10,000 political prisoners and prisoners of conscious who have never seen their days in court are languishing for years in some of the world's gruesome prisons. Some of them do not even have prisoner files. Some of the major prisons are listed on the following link: http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-re ... repression

She has fired and imprisoned the country's very senior judge Chief Justice Teame Beyene for protesting against the government's interference in Judaical affairs. When the President was asked about the state of the country's legal affairs, he said: "We can't say we have courts, their disservice is greater than their service." So why didn't he not fire the Minister of Justice? Why would he reword a failure with another decade in office? One could say she was appointed to be the Minister of Injustice not the Minister of Justice!

To be continued.............

Image



Re: Probably Africa's No.1 Minister of inJustice - Fozia Hashim

Postby sarcasm » 28 Sep 2013, 16:05


Another unjust concept introduced by the Ministry of inJustice is the permanent deferral of the age of majority from the Eritrean Youth. The age of majority is the threshold of adulthood as it is conceptualized in law. It is an age when minors cease to legally be considered children and assume control over their persons, actions, and decisions, thereby terminating the legal control and legal responsibilities of their parents. In shaebia's Eritrea, the youth are rounded up for military service at the age of 18 (sometimes younger). However, if they manage to escape from the never ending unsalaried military service after 5, 10 even 15 years, their parents will get imprisoned and have to pay50,000 Nakfa. (A secondary school teacher in Eritrea earns less that 2,000 Nakfa per month before taxes. The fine is equivalent to 5 years' gross salary of a well-off high school teacher.) You can be a 40 years old married husband who has his parents' house 10 and 15 years ago, but your parents are still responsible for your actions.

Eritreans have 400 to 500 years old customary laws where a child reaches the legal age (ዓቅሚ ኣዳም) at the age of 18 or 21 in some regions. At this age, the parents cease to be responsible for the actions of their children and the child is considered an adult and becomes responsible for his / her action. According to the Ministry of inJustice, however, you are considered adult enough to carry arms and go to war at the age of eighteen, but your parents are still responsible for your action if you decide to escape, even if they have not seen you for a decade! In the similar world of the mafias, parents and family members are taken hostages or killed as revenge. For now, let me conclude today's posting by inviting to you read a poem by Tesfaldet Gebregergish from nharnet.

ኣሳሪ ወደይ ተኣሳሪ ባዕለይ
ወይለይ ወይለይ
ጸገመይ እባ ፍሎጡለይ
ኣሳሪ ሓወይ ተኣሳሪ ባዕለይ
ኣነ ታይ ገበነይ ታይከ ፍርደይ
ክንዲ ዓቅሚ ኣዳም ውሉደይ
ክእሰር ተፈሪደ
ክከፍል ተገዲደ
ኣንታ ኣምላክ
ጎቦ ሳሕል ታይ ወለደ
ሃጽ ኢለዶ ክጠፍእ ተሰዲደ
ናጽነት ኢለዶ መግዛእቲ ወሊደ
ክልእክ ኢለ ወሊደ
ኣምሂረ ኣሰዊደ
በሕዋተይ ዝበልክዎም
ብዘይ ገበነይ ንሕማቅ ተፈሪደ
ንደቀይ ከምዓሳ ገፊፎም
እንዳይ ጥራያ ኣትሪፎም
50 000ሺሕ ክፈል ኢሎምኒ ንመሳርፎም
ገንዘብስ ክከፍል ተፈሪደ ተገዲደ
ሃልዋት ደቀይ ኣሎ ዝገደደ
ይህሉዉ ዶኮን ብሂወቶም
ተሰዲዶም ደኮኑ ኣንጸርጺሮም
ተቀቲሎም ዶኮኑ ተኣሲሮም
ዝረኣየ ዶኮን እህሉ መቃብሮም
ምዳቅ ደቀይ ከይፈለጥኩ
ኣብ ሸላዶ ተዳጎንኩ
ሓባል በልያ ከይትቅድመኪ ኮይንኒ
ኣነ ክንዲ ዝሓቶምሲ እሓቱኒ
ኮር ተገምጠል ካብኮነኒ
ኦ ኣምላክ ዳንየኒ
ብጀካካ መን ኣሎኒ
እልምነካ ለኩ ተመኒኒ
ሰብ ሕሱም ስባ እዚኣ ፈሪድኒ
ውሉደይ ጸጋይ እስካ ዝሃብካኒ
ሰብ ርጉም የሕዲግኒ
ቃል ወላዲ ኤርትራ



Re: Probably Africa's No.1 Minister of inJustice - Fozia Hashim

Postby sarcasm » 29 Sep 2013, 07:46


Excerpt from Elsa Chyrum's open letter (30 September 2005) to Fozia Hashim

....By twist of fate, you are the Minister of Justice for a government that is being incessantly accused and blamed for the gross violations of human rights, and by the powers bestowed on this Ministry, the protection of citizens’ rights rests entirely upon you. When the powers of an office are conducted accordingly, that same office is respected; but when it abuses that power, it is held responsible for crimes committed. I am sure this is not unknown secret to you.

Unfortunately, at this moment in time, if we see Eritrea as an independent nation, we cannot say there is a rule of law that protects the rights of citizens. If you wish to confirm these allegations, it should not be necessary for you to visit Dahlak, Ghel’alo, Wi’a, Ghedem, Hadish M’asker and the prisons spread out all over the wilderness in the countryside. All you have to do is go to Karsheli – just one kilometre away from your office. There, you will see conditions that can make you shed tears of blood – not water. That is when I can make you understand to what extent the rights of Eritreans have been violated. If you have a heart, you might cry and weep.

In Karsheli, there are prisoners who have no files and not at all known to the legal authorities. They have been locked behind bars not for months but years. All you need to do is to slightly open the doors and see the dirt, the hunger, the disease, the stink and look at their ashen- faced expression and, if there is a heart in you, your face will be washed in tears. There will be prisoners with swollen legs, dry lips, hollow eyes, skeletal faces and many who lost their minds.

But I don’t think you have the courage to get close to them.


Honourable Minister,

Ask anyone of the 8 members of the interrogation department about the prisoners of that 6 by 5 large prison cell. Just ask what their crime is. The problem is no member would know what reply to give. All they would say is that the prisoners are there by the orders of the President’s Office and security headquarters. And ask them if the legal authorities have any knowledge of these. The answer is clear. They will say, ‘No’.

Even the modified legal procedures inherited from the Ethiopian rule declare that any prisoner should not be held for more than 48 hours without charge. If a case needs clarification and demands a prisoner be held for longer, it requires the permission and approval of a court for an extension of not more than 28 days. Despite this knowledge, you will find out that the prisoners have not only been detained for months, but for years and most of them did not even commit crimes that require the attention of a court of law.

These are not the only abuses.

If you visit the 2nd Police Station (next door to Karsheli prison), you will find a tea shop on the right hand side and behind that, there is a huge iron gate. This is the big gate that leads to Karsheli. Once you enter, you will find men and women who are beaten while suspended like slaughtered sheep. It is much harder for the women. The beating is so harsh that they experience undue periods of their menstruation cycle. They bleed and they are not provided with water or pieces of cloth to clean themselves up. The blood flows down their legs and they are with their clothes soaked in blood. They look awful.


Honourable Minister,

May be you cannot or do not want to differentiate the pain and suffering of the Eritrean people from the sound of sweet music. But you should not forget that you will be held accountable for all these atrocities when the dawn of justice arrives. ...............

Read more at http://www.ehrea.org/ELSA.htm



Re: Probably Africa's No.1 Minister of inJustice - Fozia Hashim

Postby sarcasm » 17 Aug 2014, 18:29


sarcasm wrote:Her great achievements cannot be listed in one post, but I will try to list a few:
Eritreans do not have political, religious, individual right to life, liberty, personal security, freedom from torture, freedom from arbitrary arrest and exile, right to fair public hearing etc

Eritrea had a handful prisons in Asmara when Fozia came to power. As a result of her successful endeavor to spread injustice in the whole country, Eritrea currently has many prisons in every sub-region ( Awraja, Wereda and Neus Wereda). Around 10,000 political prisoners and prisoners of conscious who have never seen their days in court are languishing for years in some of the world's gruesome prisons. Some of them do not even have prisoner files. Some of the major prisons are listed on the following link: http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-re ... repression

She has fired and imprisoned the country's very senior judge Chief Justice Teame Beyene for protesting against the government's interference in Judaical affairs. When the President was asked about the state of the country's legal affairs, he said: "We can't say we have courts, their disservice is greater than their service." So why didn't he not fire the Minister of Justice? Why would he reword a failure with another decade in office? One could say she was appointed to be the Minister of Injustice not the Minister of Justice!

To be continued.............

[Image: http://hornofafrica.de/wp-content/uploa ... 05/005.jpg]


Please find below the video of the President's assessment of the justice affairs of the country in September 1996. How would he assess the situation now, 18 years after the interview below?




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