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Zmeselo
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Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 18 Jun 2019, 16:09

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Last edited by Zmeselo on 18 Jun 2019, 16:35, edited 2 times in total.

Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 18 Jun 2019, 16:13

AMB. Beyene Russom (@BeyeneRussom) Tweeted:

I welcomed the new Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), Ms Inger Anderson & introduced her to Ambasssdors of our African Diplomatic Corps in Nairobi. Said, she will work closely with African countries in environmental issues.








Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 18 Jun 2019, 18:05


Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 18 Jun 2019, 20:04



“Let’s grow the future together”



Written by ministry of Agriculture

http://www.shabait.com/articles/nation- ... e-together

Articles

Message of Ibrahim Thiaw Executive Secretary, UN Convention to Combat Desertification

World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought 17 June 2019

There are only three things you need to know about the World Day to Combat Desertification: it isn’t just about sand, it isn’t an isolated issue that will quietly disappear, and it isn’t someone else’s problem. It’s about restoring and protecting the fragile layer of land which only covers a third of the Earth, but which can either alleviate or accelerate the double-edged crisis facing our biodiversity and our climate. That makes it the problem of anyone who wants to eat, drink or breathe; to make their home in a town, in the country or even in security; to use technology, medicine or infrastructure; to have equal access to work, learning or relaxation. To live, Twenty-five years ago, the international community acknowledged the central role our land plays in that equation and beyond, by creating the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. Since then, 196 countries and the European Union have signed up to coordinated actions for sustainable land management. They have restored well over five million hectares of land in the Sahel region to produce half a million tons of grain each year.

They have used forests to help farmers in Brazil, Indonesia, China and India improve their crops and water supplies. They have fueled a land restoration economy in the US to generate around USD25 billion and 126,000 jobs in a single year. And there are similar stories around the world.

However, there are even more stories about how poor land management has degraded an area twice the size of China and shaped a farming sector that contributes nearly a quarter of all greenhouse gases. There are even more stories about how half the people on this planet are affected by that damaged land or live in urban areas, consuming resources that require 200 times as much land as their towns and cities and generating 70 per cent of emissions.

For the next 25 years, I would love to say that as the only international treaty dealing with land management, we have our work cut out to turn that around before the population reaches nine billion. But I can’t. We simply don’t have that long. Because unless we rapidly get control of the land that underpins our biodiversity and provides the second largest carbon reservoir on this planet, we will trigger a series of reactions that puts the outcome entirely beyond our control.

Which is why the world is determined that by 2030, we will switch from destroying the Earth to making it productive enough to grow a better future for everyone. If we take action to restore our degraded land, it will save $1.3 billion a day to invest in the education, equality and clean energy that can reduce poverty, conflict and environmental migration.

In recent months, the leading authorities from science, finance and government have sounded the alarm about the very real, very imminent threats from biodiversity loss and climate change. Better land management does not hold all the answers, but it offers a stepping stone to reach our goals by 2030 and then act as a natural multiplier of their benefits.

People around the world are learning to understand their own impact on the climate and make choices to reduce it. But, if we want to keep three times as much carbon locked beneath our feet as above them, then we also need to understand our impact on the land and learn to live within our means.

So, for this World Day to Combat Desertification, I am calling on everyone to drive this change from the ground up; to make choices and take action, either privately or professionally, as producers or consumers, to protect and restore our land. Let’s grow the future together.

Temt
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Posts: 1834
Joined: 04 Jun 2013, 22:23

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Temt » 18 Jun 2019, 20:28

Oh boy, my dear brother, ወድ'ዛ ሓላል መሬት፡ now that you mentioned the word "Petroleum" in connection with Eritrea, on this website that has become the playground of Agames, you will drive them berserk and troll on over speed. ኣየ ናይ ዓጋመ ነገር!

pastlast
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Posts: 1243
Joined: 19 May 2019, 18:02

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by pastlast » 18 Jun 2019, 21:20

Happy to Know there is Petroleum in Eritrea. Now Isayas Afwrki can be a Fat ARAB SHEIKH Dictator! Drop all the secular nonsense

Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 18 Jun 2019, 21:23

Over 4.6 billion Nakfa disbursed in support of families of martyrs



Asmara, 18 June 2019

http://shabait.com/news/local-news/2874 ... of-martyrs

The Government of Eritrea, over the past 15 years, has disbursed over 4.6 billion Nakfa in support of families of martyrs.

In the interview with Erina in connection with Martyrs Day 20 June, Mr. Zeray Tekleab, head of Families of Martyrs Wellbeing, said that according to proclamation 137/2003 the Government started to pay families of martyrs 500 Nakfa monthly since 2004 and that yearly the Government makes about 350 million Nakfa payment.

Mr. Zeray went on to say that apart from the monthly payment, the Government has disbursed over 144 million Nakfa in support of needy families of martyrs and material support and training; to enable families of martyrs become self supportive and productive members of the society.

Mr. Zeray further stated that nationals living inside the country and abroad, have also taken the initiative to support families of martyrs and that many have assumed responsibility to support more than one families of martyrs.

Renovating residential houses and ploughing and collecting agricultural harvest has created spiritual satisfaction to the families of martyrs, Mr. Zeray added.

pastlast
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Posts: 1243
Joined: 19 May 2019, 18:02

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by pastlast » 18 Jun 2019, 21:27

What a JOKE, 500 Nakfa a month for someones life. Where is all the NEVSUN MONEY GOING TO in ERITREA?
Zmeselo wrote:
18 Jun 2019, 21:23
Over 4.6 billion Nakfa disbursed in support of families of martyrs



Asmara, 18 June 2019

http://shabait.com/news/local-news/2874 ... of-martyrs

The Government of Eritrea, over the past 15 years, has disbursed over 4.6 billion Nakfa in support of families of martyrs.

In the interview with Erina in connection with Martyrs Day 20 June, Mr. Zeray Tekleab, head of Families of Martyrs Wellbeing, said that according to proclamation 137/2003 the Government started to pay families of martyrs 500 Nakfa monthly since 2004 and that yearly the Government makes about 350 million Nakfa payment.

Mr. Zeray went on to say that apart from the monthly payment, the Government has disbursed over 144 million Nakfa in support of needy families of martyrs and material support and training; to enable families of martyrs become self supportive and productive members of the society.

Mr. Zeray further stated that nationals living inside the country and abroad, have also taken the initiative to support families of martyrs and that many have assumed responsibility to support more than one families of martyrs.

Renovating residential houses and ploughing and collecting agricultural harvest has created spiritual satisfaction to the families of martyrs, Mr. Zeray added.

Awash
Senior Member+
Posts: 26760
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Awash » 19 Jun 2019, 04:22

Mo money for the Agame.

Degnet
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Posts: 23297
Joined: 16 Feb 2013, 11:48

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Degnet » 19 Jun 2019, 04:30

Zmeselo wrote:
18 Jun 2019, 20:04


“Let’s grow the future together”



Written by ministry of Agriculture

http://www.shabait.com/articles/nation- ... e-together

Articles

Message of Ibrahim Thiaw Executive Secretary, UN Convention to Combat Desertification

World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought 17 June 2019

There are only three things you need to know about the World Day to Combat Desertification: it isn’t just about sand, it isn’t an isolated issue that will quietly disappear, and it isn’t someone else’s problem. It’s about restoring and protecting the fragile layer of land which only covers a third of the Earth, but which can either alleviate or accelerate the double-edged crisis facing our biodiversity and our climate. That makes it the problem of anyone who wants to eat, drink or breathe; to make their home in a town, in the country or even in security; to use technology, medicine or infrastructure; to have equal access to work, learning or relaxation. To live, Twenty-five years ago, the international community acknowledged the central role our land plays in that equation and beyond, by creating the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. Since then, 196 countries and the European Union have signed up to coordinated actions for sustainable land management. They have restored well over five million hectares of land in the Sahel region to produce half a million tons of grain each year.

They have used forests to help farmers in Brazil, Indonesia, China and India improve their crops and water supplies. They have fueled a land restoration economy in the US to generate around USD25 billion and 126,000 jobs in a single year. And there are similar stories around the world.

However, there are even more stories about how poor land management has degraded an area twice the size of China and shaped a farming sector that contributes nearly a quarter of all greenhouse gases. There are even more stories about how half the people on this planet are affected by that damaged land or live in urban areas, consuming resources that require 200 times as much land as their towns and cities and generating 70 per cent of emissions.

For the next 25 years, I would love to say that as the only international treaty dealing with land management, we have our work cut out to turn that around before the population reaches nine billion. But I can’t. We simply don’t have that long. Because unless we rapidly get control of the land that underpins our biodiversity and provides the second largest carbon reservoir on this planet, we will trigger a series of reactions that puts the outcome entirely beyond our control.

Which is why the world is determined that by 2030, we will switch from destroying the Earth to making it productive enough to grow a better future for everyone. If we take action to restore our degraded land, it will save $1.3 billion a day to invest in the education, equality and clean energy that can reduce poverty, conflict and environmental migration.

In recent months, the leading authorities from science, finance and government have sounded the alarm about the very real, very imminent threats from biodiversity loss and climate change. Better land management does not hold all the answers, but it offers a stepping stone to reach our goals by 2030 and then act as a natural multiplier of their benefits.

People around the world are learning to understand their own impact on the climate and make choices to reduce it. But, if we want to keep three times as much carbon locked beneath our feet as above them, then we also need to understand our impact on the land and learn to live within our means.

So, for this World Day to Combat Desertification, I am calling on everyone to drive this change from the ground up; to make choices and take action, either privately or professionally, as producers or consumers, to protect and restore our land. Let’s grow the future together.
Let this be between you and your comrades,I myself am disgusted by what I hear from you.Stay on the ground and you will be respected as everyone.

Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 19 Jun 2019, 07:00




Awash
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Posts: 26760
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Awash » 19 Jun 2019, 09:09


Zmeselo
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Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 19 Jun 2019, 09:16

Elsa chrmti, looks more like a monkey than Yemane monkey. :lol:
Awash wrote:
19 Jun 2019, 09:09
Eritrea and Monkey
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_ ... composer=0

Awash
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Posts: 26760
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Awash » 19 Jun 2019, 09:39

Zombie,
Ugly is to the bone. Monkey looks like he just came out of crude oil.
:lol: :lol: :mrgreen:

Zmeselo
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Posts: 17043
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Zmeselo » 19 Jun 2019, 10:07

At least he's a guy. Beauty, is not that important.

What is she?

I mean c'mon! :lol:

She had a stroke, or something?




Awash wrote:
19 Jun 2019, 09:39
Zombie,
Ugly is to the bone. Monkey looks like he just came out of crude oil.
:lol: :lol: :mrgreen:

Awash
Senior Member+
Posts: 26760
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Awash » 19 Jun 2019, 11:15

Deqi komarit,
When is your Agame junta going to release the prisoners?






Awash
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Posts: 26760
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea and Petroleum.

Post by Awash » 19 Jun 2019, 11:18

Now, yo mama is UGLY


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