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ethiopianunity
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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by ethiopianunity » 25 Dec 2012, 02:23

XXX
Deatr ER,

My applogies for not opening my eyes that you have longer page on this issue that I thought you didn't post my comments.

yoha
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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by yoha » 25 Dec 2012, 03:50

YENEGESTAT TARIK TERET TERET !! No wonder why meles said that , we are here in 21st century but you still talking about 18th century ? what good would come out this history ? beside ATSE TEDROS most of them didn't have no vision for majority Ethiopian people.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 25 Dec 2012, 05:41

yoha wrote:YENEGESTAT TARIK TERET TERET !! No wonder why meles said that , we are here in 21st century but you still talking about 18th century ? what good would come out this history ? beside ATSE TEDROS most of them didn't have no vision for majority Ethiopian people.
A driver that is moving forward needs side mirrors so that he can see what's behind him. Being ignorant about our past is the biggest mistake we Ethiopians could make. The reason Meles Zenawi had a problem with our history and always found it easy to belittle it was because of his Banda bloodline and arrogant hooliganish nature.

Yoha, by your own admission you are an Eritrean and this is a list of people who influenced modern Ethiopia most. The Eritreans role in the making of modern Ethiopia is minimal If not nothing. So your opinion is not of any value because the only probable thing you and your ancestors contributed towards Ethiopian history is providing Askari soldiers for Italians. So stick to your own past and don't stick your uninvited Eritrean nose where it don't belong.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Zmeselo » 25 Dec 2012, 07:39

It´s not looking to the past, per se, that helps to navigate in the future but how one reads the past. For example, there´re germans today who see to Hitler only in a positive light forgetting his misdeeds towards them and others. Your analysis of these royals and feudal lords is not objective. It´s emotional and as you say in amarigna "t´z´ta" of the past glory you people had. Meles´ belittling of ethiopian past is not mature because he was the leader of the same country and what he should´ve done is, change the archaic system silently and let historians come with the verdict of past ethiopian history and rulers.

You know damn well, the eritrean contribution to Ethiopia and the influence it had and still has, so I don´t want to debate that right now. Suffice to say: Bahri Negassi Isaaq, Awalom Berhe, Zerai Derres, Abraham Debotch, Mogos Asghedom, Lorenzo Taezaz, Aman Andom etc.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 25 Dec 2012, 12:56

Zmeselo wrote:It´s not looking to the past, per se, that helps to navigate in the future but how one reads the past. For example, there´re germans today who see to Hitler only in a positive light forgetting his misdeeds towards them and others. Your analysis of these royals and feudal lords is not objective. It´s emotional and as you say in amarigna "t´z´ta" of the past glory you people had.
The list is not based on who did the least misdeeds or who killed the least people. It is simply based on long-lasting influence. I don't think the analysis is based on emotions alone like you claimed. For instance I didn't jut heap praise Empress Taytu, I also criticize her reactionary, conservative and xenophobic instincts which curtailed much needed modernity at the time.. I critisised Emp. haile Silassie for not bringing Ethiopia towards a representative democracy because his reign was the right time. I put both sides of opinions on controversial persons like Ras Gobenna. So If I based it on soley my emotions as you claimed and who I personally liked, the list would look completely different.
Zmeselo wrote:Meles´ belittling of ethiopian past is not mature because he was the leader of the same country and what he should´ve done is, change the archaic system silently and let historians come with the verdict of past ethiopian history and rulers.
You know damn well, the eritrean contribution to Ethiopia and the influence it had and still has, so I don´t want to debate that right now. Suffice to say: Bahri Negassi Isaaq, Awalom Berhe, Zerai Derres, Abraham Debotch, Mogos Asghedom, Lorenzo Taezaz, Aman Andom etc.
Bahri Negassi Isaaq lived way before the mid-1850s which was the start of modern and cetralised Ethiopia.
But all the people you mentioned were influential enough in their own way. People like Zerai Deres is still celebrated in war songs. But these people contributed as individuals. As a people, the inhabitants of Eritrea were not as influential because for the most part Eritrea was under foreign occupation which narrowed down the pool. After unity though, AMan Andom probably had the best chance but was out-manuveoured or out-hooliganed by other senior military leaders of the time.

ethiopianunity
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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by ethiopianunity » 27 Dec 2012, 05:32

Zmeselo wrote:It´s not looking to the past, per se, that helps to navigate in the future but how one reads the past. For example, there´re germans today who see to Hitler only in a positive light forgetting his misdeeds towards them and others. Your analysis of these royals and feudal lords is not objective. It´s emotional and as you say in amarigna "t´z´ta" of the past glory you people had. Meles´ belittling of ethiopian past is not mature because he was the leader of the same country and what he should´ve done is, change the archaic system silently and let historians come with the verdict of past ethiopian history and rulers.

You know damn well, the eritrean contribution to Ethiopia and the influence it had and still has, so I don´t want to debate that right now. Suffice to say: Bahri Negassi Isaaq, Awalom Berhe, Zerai Derres, Abraham Debotch, Mogos Asghedom, Lorenzo Taezaz, Aman Andom etc.

Eritrea's contribution... well unless in fact the other way around. Since their indpendence, they have economically prospered, educated in Ethiopia without pro ethnicization. Since their struggle and today all the skills they generated is going to Eritrea and to their own communities. The people you mentioned above collaborated with Ethiopia in order to free themselves from shackles of colonization. The collaboration with Ethiopia was a positive thing for both Ethiopia and Eritrea. This means the unity of both Eritrea and Ethiopia towards one common goal will bring positive outcome to both countries so this was good. Most of all, Eritreans were able to finally live in free and prosperous ways with Ethiopians. Unfortuantely some of you collabarated again a path to pro Eritrean and isolationisim and heavily campaigning against Ethiopia. Aman Andom was working with foreigners to bring down Haile Selassie, but Mengistu beat him to it.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 28 Dec 2012, 15:45

11. Ato Kassa Mircha later Emperor Yohannes IV aka Aba Bezbez Born; May Beha, Tigray
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Just missing out on the top 10 influential leaders is Emperor Yohannes, making it at no 11. The Emperor reigned at a very unfortunate time, a time when Ethiopia was engaged in constant battles for its sovereignty. Which meant he couldn't build on the unification process which Tewodros started therefore had to be finished off by Menelik later on. Instead he had to fend off many colonial ambitions and successfully lead Ethiopia to victory in several places, Gura and Gundet to name a few. All great men had other great personnel beneath them - Menelik had Ras Gobenna and many others,Tewodros had Fit. Gebrye and Atse Yohannes also had Ras Allula. A comptenet and acomplished General who was the leading figure in the battle against colonial ambitions most notably at a place called Dogali, present day Eritrea.
People accuse the Emperor of treason for blatantly collaborating with Britain and contribute to the downfall of Emp. Tewodros his rivall. But in my personal opinion Emp. Yohannes may have commited treason by collaborating with a foreign entity, but pretty much every prominent warlord of the time had been in contact with one European power or the other. Also, Emp. Yohannes made up for it by constantly fighting to keep Ethiopia Independent to the extent of giving his life at Mettema in the fight aginst the Dervishes of Sudan. The Emperor also accused of antagonising the muslim population of Ethiopia when he engaged in forced conversion of Muslim Ethiopians to Christianity which caused many muslim especially of Wollo to flee to south to Gurage where Yohaness's contol was minimal or to the Sudan.
To sum his career up, Emp. Yohannes was unlucky to come to power at a very troublesome time and had to be engaged in constant warfare as a result. Which meant he couldn't leave his mark on modern Ethiopia as much as the other leaders of the time. However his early "treasonous" action of collaboration with Europeans was balanced out by his patriotism and nationalist reign which secured Ethiopia's independence.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 28 Dec 2012, 18:22

12. Ato Belay Zeleke Lakew later Dejazmach Belay Zeleke aka Aba Kostir Born; Chaketa, Wollo
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Even though, he was born in Wollo, Belay Zeleke made his name in Bichena, Gojjam-his fathers country. When young, his father was killed after violent altercations with Ras Hailu's men. Therefore he grew up without a father, dreaming about revenge. When Italy occupied the country, a hardened and young Belay Zeleke decided to fight rather than submit. He organised his brothers and close relatives and engaged the Italians in small hit-and-run operations for the first year of the occupation. His followers only consisted of less than 60 close relatives. Italy's forced were frustrated due to the constant headaches mainly from Abebe Aregai in Shewa and Belay Zeleke in Gojjam. Therefore they settled on harsh measures to stop the natives of these regions from supporting the Arbegnoch. Therefore Italy went on a campaign of burning villages and terrorismin places they suspected were supporters of these men. These actions by the Italians allowed Belay Zeleke to have more followers. In the end the province of Gojjam was mostly liberated territory apart from the main cities. Which explains why Haile-Silassie chose to enter from Sudan through Gojjam when he returned form Britain. When the Emperor entered the capital of Gojjam, Debre-Markos, 44,000 Belay Zeleke's surviver followers welcomed him in a parade and Belay submitted to the Emperor. His prestige and influence was very high which made Haile-Silassie disfavoure him. The Emperor appointed many banda's to prominent position while appointing Belay Zeleke to just a governor of Bichena with a rank of Dejazmach. Many of the bandas viewed Belay zeleke's popularity with envy and suspicion and causing him to have powerful enemies. In the end Belay Zeleke rebelled and ended up arrested. He was pardoned by the Emperor but he still ended up in altercations with his scheming enemies once again. He was arrested again but escaped. He was finally caught and tried in military court with death. The Emperor approved. And he was killed at just 35 years of age. He managed to accomplish so much and rise to lofty heights at a young age. Today, he is known as one of the prominent Arbegnoch alongside Ras Abeebe Aregai, Ras Desta Damtew and Dejach. Gerresu Duki. But he is the most influential of them all because of the extent of his achievements in such a short space of time.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Aragaw » 28 Dec 2012, 19:42

Mengistu and Germame Neway
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Brigadier General Mengistu Neway who was commander of the Imperial Body Guard and who together with his brother Germame Neway, led an unsuccessful coup against Emperor Haile Selassie was hanged on March 30, 1960 in public market after two days Haile Selassie appointed Court ordered for him to be hanged.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Yusuf Hiigsi Muzaydi » 30 Dec 2012, 09:50

if you want my opinion in Ethiopia and in Africa the most influential would be Haile sellesie and Menelik one for his role against the Italians colonialists showing the quiet leadership Africa never had. And haile selassie for forming a gateway between the old Ethiopia and the modern Ethiopia even though he had lots of shortcomings.

Yusuf Hiigsi
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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 30 Dec 2012, 12:13

Yusuf Hiigsi Muzaydi wrote:if you want my opinion in Ethiopia and in Africa the most influential would be Haile sellesie and Menelik one for his role against the Italians colonialists showing the quiet leadership Africa never had. And haile selassie for forming a gateway between the old Ethiopia and the modern Ethiopia even though he had lots of shortcomings.

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Ato Yusuf, your opinion is appreciated and I see where you are coming from by saying haile silassie and Menelik are the most influential. But in my opinion these two individuals were only finishing what tewodros started. Tewodros's drive for unity using military power was a monumental and the most important change that occureded in the horn of Africa at that time. Hence, he deserves he title as the "most influential". But this topic is up for debate and evryone's opinion is welcome.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Naga Tuma » 30 Dec 2012, 12:25

Dejach Aklilu wrote: Ato Yusuf, your opinion is appreciated and I see where you are coming from by saying haile silassie and Menelik are the most influential. But in my opinion these two individuals were only finishing what tewodros started. Tewodros's drive for unity using military power was a monumental and the most important change that occureded in the horn of Africa at that time. Hence, he deserves he title as the "most influential". But this topic is up for debate and evryone's opinion is welcome.
Keep them coming. This list can go up to one hundred or more. I want to learn more about what the people I heard about have done, including how they got the titles. I didn't know much about Belay Zeleke and know little about the other Rases, such as Ras Alula, Ras Abebe, and so on. I think it should also include people who were resistant to the centralization effort, such as King Tona, since they have also made history, and their quests are still part of the solution that may have to be put on the axis of centralization-decentralization tendencies.

Etopian enquirer

Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Etopian enquirer » 30 Dec 2012, 17:01

This topic is so much more educational and better than the usual garbage on this forum. So thanx Elias and the starter of the topic Dejach aklilu. We Ethiopians should take what's good about our history and leave what bad behind. I also like aklilu's interpretations. Coz he has put differing views and opinions on the people in the list. Thanx again.

Ethiopian enquirer

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 02 Jan 2013, 17:33

Naga Tuma wrote:
Dejach Aklilu wrote: Ato Yusuf, your opinion is appreciated and I see where you are coming from by saying haile silassie and Menelik are the most influential. But in my opinion these two individuals were only finishing what tewodros started. Tewodros's drive for unity using military power was a monumental and the most important change that occureded in the horn of Africa at that time. Hence, he deserves he title as the "most influential". But this topic is up for debate and evryone's opinion is welcome.
Keep them coming. This list can go up to one hundred or more. I want to learn more about what the people I heard about have done, including how they got the titles. I didn't know much about Belay Zeleke and know little about the other Rases, such as Ras Alula, Ras Abebe, and so on. I think it should also include people who were resistant to the centralization effort, such as King Tona, since they have also made history, and their quests are still part of the solution that may have to be put on the axis of centralization-decentralization tendencies.
i agree...the next person on the list is against the centralization and Ethiopian nationalism in general.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 02 Jan 2013, 19:11

13. Ato Walleligne Mekonnen Kassa Kurahe Born; Debre Sina, Wollo
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In terms of influence, Walleligne Mekonnen is one of the least under-estimated and under-credited Ethiopian individuals. He is the second most influential person who have influenced modern Ethiopia while not having held any official political position of the state. The other being Abune Petros who is the most influential person with no political positions in his CV.
Walleligne was born in Debre Sina, Wollo although some sources say he was born in Amara Sayint. After finishing his high school studies, he enrolled into Addis Ababa university. Where he became active in student activism which at the time subscribed to radical socialist ideology. He eventually rose to be a very well known figure among the students and managed to write, arguably the most important, the most controversial and the most debatable article concerning modern Ethiopia. It was called "On the question of nationalities in Ethiopia". He paid a heavy price for his outspoken views even to the extent of being imprisoned but was later freed due to the emperor's pardon.
Walleligne political outlook in short characterized Ethiopian nationalism as non-existent. It was a simple tool the monarchy used to preach unity and protect their feudal rule. He viewed Ethiopianwinet as just being an Amara. Viewing the ruling class of the Negede-Amara and their junior partners the Tigres as subjugators of other ethnic groups within the state called Ethiopia. He acknowledged that Ethiopia wasn't a nation but rather was a state with many imprisoned nationalities. Therefore Walleligne's influence is clearly evident on EPRDF's constitution which starts as "We the nations, nationalities and peoples of Ethiopia..." as well as guarenteeing secession for any nationality within the state(Article 39). If any one person who could've single handedly written the woyanne's constituion, it would have been Walleligne Mekonnen. The operation by EPRDF to capture the city of Desse,Wollo in the civil war was named "Operation Walleligne" in honour of him.
Walleligne's critics hold him and the student movement of the 1960s primarily responsible for the downward spirall Ethiopia has gone through ever since the fall of the monarchy. They also say that the type of ethnic politics Walleligne has preached has been practiced by woyanne, and the only thing the country has gained is more ethnic tensions, hatred and possibly ethnic based warfare.
On the other hand Walleligne's supporters say that Woyanne's model of politics in Ethiopia should not be equated with Walleligne's ideology. Because woyanne practices ethnic politics not for the well-being of the ethnicities in the country but as a divide and rule tactic. Hence, they think that Wallelign's ideology has not been properly tried and tested in Ethiopia and will in time be the right ideology for the future. Whether you disagree with Walleligne's veiws or agree with them, there is one fact that both his critics and supporters seem to agree on, It is that he was one of the most influential people to have ever come out of modern Ethiopia. And deserves to be named as the 13th most influential person. Walleligne was buried in Desse after he was killed when participating in a failed attempt to hijack an Ethiopian airplane.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 03 Jan 2013, 11:10

14. Ato Balcha Safo later Dejazmach Balcha Safo aka Abba Nefso Born; Gurageland
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Balcha Safo was one of the many men Menelik nurtured from a nobody to greatness. He was captured by Menelik's men just like the other famous shewan Fitawrari Habte-Giyorgis. Menelik ordered Ras Mekonnen to tutor the young Balcha. After a while with Ras Mekonnen, he is sent to Menelik's court. Then the two develop a father-son relationship culminating in Blacha gaining Menelik's trust. Resulting in Balcha being appointed treasurer of Menelik's court. His influence and reputation though wasn't high until he participated in two major battles, Battle of Mekelle and Adwa in which the simple treasurer proved his military might on the battlefield as well. Menelik appoints him the rank of Dejazmach as a reward as well as Governor of Sidamo region. Later, Balcha served as a governor of Harar. It was a task which he found hard to perform. Harar was a place with so many different types of people and a trading hub that attracted Oromos, Amharas, Somalis, Yemenis, Aderes, Afars, Frenchmen and many more. A governorship of Harar was a delicate business in which only Ras Mekonnen excelled at with his cautious approach to governing and respect to ethnic diversity. During Ras Mekonnen's time Harar transformed from a focal point of violence to being a pacified trading center with booming economy. But Balcha governing style didn't suit the local populace and he was largelytunrned out to be unpopular due to the many restrictions and regulations he introduced which curtailed the once booming economic activity. He was removed from Harar not long after and moved back to his previous position as Governor of Sidamo.
After Menelik's death, Balcha was noted for his contant refusal to follow orders form the central government. He viewed Menelik's successors as not fit enough to sit on the same throne as the former Emperor, whom he considered a father figure. He confronted Ras Tefferi Mekonnen numerious times and was once involved in a conspiracy to overthrow him led by Wubeshet Haile which landed him in prison. After numerous confrontations and feuds with Ras Tefferi(later Emp. haile-silassie), Balcha ends up being sentenced to death, but later the sentence was reduced. He even referred to Emp. Haile-Silassie by his given birth name "Tefferi" refusing to acknowledge his competence to succeed Menelik). Instead he ended up in a monastery until Italy's second invasion. During the second invasion by Italy, Emp. Haile-Silassie urges the aged Balcha to mobalise resistance fighters. Blacha leaves aside their feud and obliges to engage a common foreign enemy out of his loyality to Emp. Menelik. The Dejazmach though, wasn't his former self as he has aged considerably. Nevertheless, he led a group of resistance fighters, which wasn't enough to withstand Italy's weaponary and firepower, resulting in most of his followers dead or critically wounded. After little success he enjoyed, Balcha contacts the Italian commander around Harar, telling him he is ready to surrender to the Italians and is willing to meet him in at a specific location. The Italians acknowledged the significance of the surrender of a distinguished Shewan noble and a famous Adwa veteran. They knew it will be a huge blow to the other resistant fighters operating mainly in Gojjam and Shewa. Therefore they arrive to the location with numerous senior officers and commanders to receive the surrendering Dejazmach. They approached Balcha who at the time was dressed in the traditional Ethiopian white overalls. Suddenly for the Italians though, the ceremony of surrender didn't go according to what they expected, the aged Dejazmach recited Menelik's name out loud followed by a machine gun rampage that left most of the Italian senior officers present dead before being killed himself. That action, assured Balcha as a figure of pride in being Ethiopian and will surely be place in the hearts and minds of Ethiopians for a long time. He has a hospital named in his honour in Addis Ababa. Dejazmach Balcha career is a typical story of "Zero to hero". Turned from a simple prisoner of war into a an acclaimed patriot, an influential and nationalistic figure who has written his name in Ethiopian history in indelible ink. To some extent Emp. Menelik is considered the greatest leader by so many people because he raised and nurtured people like Dejazmach Balcha, Fitawrari Habte-Giyorgis, Ras Gobenna and Ras Mekonnen, without being curtailed by these men's different ethnicity, language and culture. Emp. Menelik simply chose these nobles according to their ability. The accomplishment of somebody like Balcha testifies to that fact. Balcha could easily have been condemned to a lifetime of hard labor because he was after all a simple prisoner of war with no aristocratic background as well as being from a different ethnicity to that of Menelik, but instead Menelik elevated him and many others considering only their ability and talents, which in turn made the Emperor accomplish so much. It is something that Woyanne's ethnic politics could learn a thing or two from.

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Deqi-Arawit » 03 Jan 2013, 11:16

I think this is racist list.. :lol: When some Goat herders ugly people are in the list...Why was General Aman Andom Absent. Northern Girma {Charisma] is all over his face 8)

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 03 Jan 2013, 11:37

Deqi-Arawit wrote:I think this is racist list.. :lol: When some Goat herders ugly people are in the list...Why was General Aman Andom Absent. Northern Girma {Charisma] is all over his face 8)

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Great grandpa deqi...why do you people always see everything through the ethnic glass? It's always we did that, we did this. This is something both Tigrayans and you their eritrean cousins have in common.

The list is based on who left a mark on Ethiopia's history. Are you telling me Aman Andom left a bigger mark on Ethiopian history than say... Balcha? :lol:
Like I said before...grandpa... You are GUILTY of overestimating your importance.

BTW...I'm still waiting for my questn I asked you? :lol:

Dejach Aklilu
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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by Dejach Aklilu » 03 Jan 2013, 11:37

Deqi-Arawit wrote:I think this is racist list.. :lol: When some Goat herders ugly people are in the list...Why was General Aman Andom Absent. Northern Girma {Charisma] is all over his face 8)

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Great grandpa deqi...why do you people always see everything through the ethnic glass? It's always we did that, we did this. This is something both Tigrayans and you their eritrean cousins have in common.

The list is based on who left a mark on Ethiopia's history. Are you telling me Aman Andom left a bigger mark on Ethiopian history than say... Balcha? :lol:
Like I said before...grandpa... You are GUILTY of overestimating your importance.

BTW...I'm still waiting for a response on the questn I asked you?

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Re: The most influential leaders of modern Ethiopia.

Post by whereisthefrog » 03 Jan 2013, 11:43

Dejach Aklilu wrote:
Deqi-Arawit wrote:I think this is racist list.. :lol: When some Goat herders ugly people are in the list...Why was General Aman Andom Absent. Northern Girma {Charisma] is all over his face 8)

Image
Great grandpa deqi...why do you people always see everything through the ethnic glass? It's always we did that, we did this. This is something both Tigrayans and you their eritrean cousins have in common.

The list is based on who left a mark on Ethiopia's history. Are you telling me Aman Andom left a bigger mark on Ethiopian history than say... Balcha? :lol:
Like I said before...grandpa... You are GUILTY of overestimating your importance.

BTW...I'm still waiting for a response on the questn I asked you?
you owe the OGADEN VICTORY to the above general if he hasn't left a mark in your history then I wonder who did :mrgreen: probs the ferenji [deleted] kisser minilik :lol:

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