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Conformist
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Conformist » 18 Jul 2013, 16:44

Arba_Gorash wrote:Image
This is a good one! :lol:

This arrogant Woyane reminds me the following Bible verse,
Proverbs 30:21-22 For three things the earth is disquieted, and for four which it cannot bear: For a servant when he reigneth; and a fool when he is filled with meat;

Ethoash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Ethoash » 18 Jul 2013, 17:08

Conformist wrote:[

This is a good one! :lol:

This arrogant Woyane reminds me the following Bible verse,
Proverbs 30:21-22 For three things the earth is disquieted, and for four which it cannot bear: For a servant when he reigneth; and a fool when he is filled with meat;

Do u real believe that the Amhara is the master and the rest of tribe are their to serve u... R u saying this Tigray man forget he was ur servant? He forget his place is that what u saying and quoted bible to support ur claim..

Conformist
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Conformist » 18 Jul 2013, 17:32

Ethoash wrote:
Conformist wrote:[

This is a good one! :lol:

This arrogant Woyane reminds me the following Bible verse,
Proverbs 30:21-22 For three things the earth is disquieted, and for four which it cannot bear: For a servant when he reigneth; and a fool when he is filled with meat;

Do u real believe that the Amhara is the master and the rest of tribe are their to serve u... R u saying this Tigray man forget he was ur servant? He forget his place is that what u saying and quoted bible to support ur claim..
The Amhara has lost his will to be a master, that's why Ethiopia is in such bad shape.

Ethoash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Ethoash » 18 Jul 2013, 17:56

Conformist wrote:
Ethoash wrote:
Conformist wrote:[

This is a good one! :lol:

This arrogant Woyane reminds me the following Bible verse,
Proverbs 30:21-22 For three things the earth is disquieted, and for four which it cannot bear: For a servant when he reigneth; and a fool when he is filled with meat;

Do u real believe that the Amhara is the master and the rest of tribe are their to serve u... R u saying this Tigray man forget he was ur servant? He forget his place is that what u saying and quoted bible to support ur claim..
The Amhara has lost his will to be a master, that's why Ethiopia is in such bad shape.
Dear confused,

I know u r an old grad, the sad thing is u realy believe in ur own crap that Amhara is a master..

I don't mind if Amhara is a master as long as if they develop the nation but this Amhara. Business r the gate keeper of poverty.

If Amhara r like Italian, south African white, American white then t least u can say they leave behind a develop nation not Amhara they want to keep us in poverty.. They have nothing to offer.
Misery and poverty.

When I go back ur quote...what u r saying is like a slave master saying America white lost their will to be master..that is why America is in this bad shape regardless of what the salve master think time march on... Ethiopia will never ruled by king, or feudal system the same way say good bye to ur supremacy

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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Arba_Gorash » 18 Jul 2013, 18:09

dano wrote:Crap,
20 million can't buy one dream-liner!
Each Boeing 787 Dreamliner has an official list price of some $207 million.
If you buy 10 Dreamliners, the total cost is over $2 billion dollars.

In March of 2011, Howard Taylor, head of the British aid program in Ethiopia said that Ethiopia will receive $2 billion in British development assistance in a four-year period. The fact of the matter is that a big chunk of the aid money disappears into the pockets of those holding the levers of power in Ethiopia, their supporters (this means you!) and bloated bureaucracies. Added to this problem is capital flight and illicit financial flows. A recent United Nations Development Program (UNDP) commissioned report from Global Financial Integrity (GFI) on illicit financial flows (money taken out of a country illegally) from the Least Developed Countries showed that Ethiopia is a top exporter of illicit capital at USD$8.4 billion.

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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by whereisthefrog » 18 Jul 2013, 18:59

Can you please show me where I said UGUM????? :roll: :roll: :roll: :mrgreen:
Degnet wrote:
whereisthefrog wrote:The chigaram weyanes were showing off their dreamliners little did we know they were bought using begged money :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



Are youn't tired yourself of using such words,you can say it with out any insult or not say some thing,by saying Ugum,you are hiding those people who should have been accused,but again,that isn't the only reason,you are trying to blind also the majority Eritreans through your damned hate propoganda.

Ethoash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Ethoash » 18 Jul 2013, 19:03

Arab Gorash,
I am not good at anything but this is simple math.

Ethiopia get 2 billion dollars Aid money

And Ethiopia bought 2 billion dollars worth of 787

Now is that no zero balance.

Wait I will super dumb it for u.

British give u money to buy ten milk cow

Now if u r stupid u buy ten milk cow but u will not get milk because before the cow give u milk they have to half Calf....for that u need bull...

Now if u r smart u buy one bull and nine cow so that u will not need British aid next time ..

Now if u invest two billion on ten 787 those plane will generate profit for next 20 years ..

Unlike if use the aid money directly with in one or two years the money will run out the people still need more aid.

my2cents
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by my2cents » 18 Jul 2013, 20:24

Image

JULY 18, 2013
THE STUDENT VICTIMS OF WASHINGTON’S DEFICIT OBSESSION
POSTED BY JAMES SUROWIECKI


When, a couple of weeks ago, the interest rate on subsidized Stafford loans (the loans that the federal government offers to college students) doubled, going from 3.4 per cent to 6.8 per cent, the expectation was that Congress would reach a quick deal to reverse—or at least reduce—the increase. After all, making college more affordable is one of the rare issues on which the differences between Democrats and Republicans seem bridgeable. Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle promised an immediate fix, and last week it appeared that a deal was about to be reached. Then Washington’s obsession with deficits got in the way. And that same obsession explains why, even if Congress does finally agree to a deal, college students are guaranteed to be paying more for loans, come the fall.

What we’re likely to end up with is what’s called a market-based system, under which the rate on student loans would be tied to the interest rate on ten-year Treasury bonds. (Currently, Congress simply decides what the interest rate will be.) The deal that the Senate appeared ready to accept last week, for instance, would set Stafford rates at the ten-year Treasury rate plus 1.8 per cent, along with a small additional charge to cover administrative costs. (This would mean that students taking out new loans would pay around 4.5 per cent.) The open question is whether, as Democrats insist, there will be a cap that would set interest rates at a maximum of 8.25 per cent. Republicans appeared willing to accept the cap, but then the Congressional Budget Office released an estimate suggesting that it could cost twenty-two billion dollars over ten years. And, since Republicans won’t go along with any plan that could increase the deficit, talks are currently in limbo.

This is an absurd state of affairs. In the first place, the C.B.O. estimate is just that—an estimate. Projecting the losses that a cap might inflict on the government depends on predicting the future course of interest rates, and there’s no reason to think that the C.B.O. has any real idea of what interest rates are going to be five or six years down the road. More important, if a market-based system is put in place, the deficit hawks have already won.

And while tying student-loan rates to Treasury rates makes sense in the long run, for the foreseeable future it’s another example of Washington being penny-wise and pound-foolish. With the economy still weak, inflation nonexistent, and interest rates low, now is not the time for the government to be cutting back on investment or making it harder for Americans to spend and invest. Yet, by raising interest rates on college students, that’s exactly what it’s doing. Members of both parties say that they want more Americans to go to college, and they agree that the U.S. economy will reap the benefits of having more educated and therefore more productive workers. Making college more expensive in a weak economy—which is what a market-based system would do—seems an unlikely way to accomplish these goals.

What the student-loan imbroglio really illustrates is the way that fiscal and monetary policy have been working at cross-purposes for years now. On the one hand, the Federal Reserve has been keeping interest rates low and pumping money into the economy, because it wants individuals and businesses to be less risk-averse and more willing to borrow, invest, and spend. At the same time, the obsession with cutting the deficit means that the federal government has been investing and spending less, and in effect pulling money out of the economy. The Fed chairman, Ben Bernanke, spoke exactly to this point when he testified before Congress yesterday, saying that tight fiscal policy has trimmed the economy’s growth rate this year by a full 1.5 per cent. And that makes the Fed’s job harder.

Unfortunately, there’s little political interest in looser fiscal policy, which explains why the student-loan debate has gone the way it has. We could, as Senate Democrats have proposed, roll rates back to where they were and keep them there for at least another year (by which time, one hopes, the economy will finally gain real steam). That would make kids more willing to go to school, and put more money in their pockets. Instead, we’re going to be asking college students to put more of their income toward interest payments, which will make them less willing to borrow for their education, and will mean that they’ll have less money available to spend on everything else. That’s precisely what you don’t want in a weak economy—yet, as with the sequester, it’s exactly what the preoccupation with the deficit has led to. What the Fed giveth, the rest of the government has been doing its best to take away.



Was Blind, But Now She Sees


Image

July 18, 2013
British Inquiry Ties 787 Fire to Beacon
By CHRISTOPHER DREW


After British authorities urged American regulators to order airlines to disconnect the batteries in the emergency transmitters on Boeing 787s, the Federal Aviation Administration took a more measured approach, saying that it would review the matter.

Britain’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch, which also called for a broader safety review of similar devices in thousands of other passenger jets, made its recommendations on Thursday after finding signs of disruption in the battery cells of an emergency transmitter on a 787 Dreamliner that caught fire while parked at Heathrow Airport last week.

Most passenger jets do not have fire suppressant systems near the devices, which send out a plane’s location after a crash. If a fire occurred in flight, the British investigators said, “it could pose a significant safety concern and raise challenges for the cabin crew.”

Boeing’s innovative new plane, which cuts fuel costs by 20 percent, is crucial to the company’s future. But the 787 has faced a series of setbacks since its introduction in late 2011.

Another type of battery caught fire earlier this year, prompting the F.A.A. to ground the plane for several months. On Thursday, a Japan Airlines 787 was forced to return to Boston shortly after takeoff. The airline said an indicator had suggested maintenance might be needed on the fuel pump, and the pilots, who were headed for Japan, turned back as a precaution.

The British findings stirred up an immediate debate, as various players in the aviation community sought to determine if the emergency transmitters posed enough of a safety threat to temporarily dismantle or remove them.

Although Britain is still investigating the cause of the fire at Heathrow, Boeing said it supported the recommendations as “reasonable precautionary measures.” Honeywell Aerospace, which makes the 6.6-pound transmitters on the 787, said the proposals were “prudent,” though it remained “premature to jump to conclusions” about the cause of the fire.

Thomson Airways in England said it would remove the batteries from its 787s. Other carriers that use similar transmitters, from major airlines to corporate jets, were left to decide whether it was safe to keep using them. The F.A.A. decided it needed more time to evaluate the proposals, which could conceivably lead to the removal of the batteries or the transmitters from most of the planes made by Boeing, Airbus and the smaller companies that make regional and business jets.

Federal officials said the lack of definitive evidence about the cause of the fire — and the fact that none of the transmitters had been known to cause a fire in more than 50 million flight hours — suggested they should take more time in reviewing the matter.

While some industry officials were surprised that the agency did not embrace the British recommendations more readily, Hans J. Weber, the president of Tecop International, an aviation consultancy in San Diego, said: “That’s just the way bureaucrats work. There’s always so much harrumphing, like, ‘You can’t tell us what to do. We will make up our own mind.’ ”

Still, he said, American regulators could end up issuing an advisory to plane owners to at least inspect the transmitters.

Robert Mann, an aviation consultant in Port Washington, N.Y., said the agency has to consider what it would mean for safety if planes fly without the transmitters, which have been particularly helpful in locating the wreckage of smaller planes.

The British recommendations, contained in a three-page interim report on the fire investigation, provided the strongest evidence yet that the emergency locator transmitter played a significant role in the fire on the Ethiopian Airlines 787. The findings were good news for Boeing because the fire most likely centered on a generic piece of equipment that is on many types of planes rather than one of the new systems on the Dreamliner.

The British report said the most extensive heat damage to the jet’s carbon-composite skin occurred at the spot where the transmitter was attached to the top of the plane near the rear left door. The report said it was not clear if the fire was initiated by a release of energy in the batteries or by an external mechanism like an electrical short. If a short occurred in the device or its wiring, the battery could have provided the energy for ignition, the report said.

The report said no other systems in that area would have contained enough stored energy to start a fire with the plane’s basic power system turned off. The transmitter, which could broadcast distress signals for many hours after a crash, is designed to operate independently of the jet’s power system.

Still, the investigators expressed surprise that the battery could have caught fire, noting that the manufacturer of the transmitter, Honeywell Aerospace, had produced 6,000 of the transmitters for a wide range of aircraft since 2005, including some Airbus planes, without similar incidents. Honeywell and other manufacturers also make similar devices for thousands of other commercial and business jets.

The report indicated that the plane had landed at Heathrow 10 hours before the fire. After the passengers departed, the plane was towed to a remote parking spot and connected to a ground power station. The power source was turned off shortly afterward.

The fire was detected by an employee in the air traffic tower, who noticed smoke coming from the plane. The report said firefighters encountered thick smoke when they entered the middle of the plane, and it became more dense as they moved toward the rear.

Investigators said a hand-held extinguisher did not stop the fire, and the firefighters had to knock down a ceiling panel to get to an upper compartment where the transmitter was. While the firefighters were then able to put out the blaze, the fire was so intense that it damaged the plane’s carbon-composite structure in that area and caused the exterior paint to blister and peel.

The high-impact plastic composites are used in about half the structure of the 787 instead of aluminum or other metals. The composites are one of the novel features that helps reduce weight and increase fuel efficiency on the 787.

The plane also has new electric and battery systems, which prompted problems in the early stages of the 787’s service. Still, airlines, attracted by fuel savings, continue to place orders for the aircraft, and Boeing expects to eventually sell thousands of the planes.

The transmitter is powered by a small lithium-manganese dioxide battery. It is not rechargeable and normally lasts for 10 years. It is similar to batteries used in fire alarms and military radios.

That battery is much smaller and less flammable than the lithium-cobalt batteries that caught fire or emitted smoke in other areas on two 787s in January. The problems with those batteries led to a four-month grounding of the 787s around the world. British investigators have said those larger lithium cobalt batteries were nowhere near where the fire occurred on the Ethiopian jet and played no role in it.

Image
Last edited by my2cents on 18 Jul 2013, 21:22, edited 2 times in total.

Arba_Gorash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Arba_Gorash » 18 Jul 2013, 20:55

Ethoash wrote:Arab Gorash,
I am not good at anything but this is simple math.

Ethiopia get 2 billion dollars Aid money

And Ethiopia bought 2 billion dollars worth of 787

Now is that no zero balance.

Wait I will super dumb it for u.

British give u money to buy ten milk cow

Now if u r stupid u buy ten milk cow but u will not get milk because before the cow give u milk they have to half Calf....for that u need bull...

Now if u r smart u buy one bull and nine cow so that u will not need British aid next time ..

Now if u invest two billion on ten 787 those plane will generate profit for next 20 years ..

Unlike if use the aid money directly with in one or two years the money will run out the people still need more aid.
Your logic would have made sense if the 35 million Ethiopians in desperate need for aid were all Airline pilots and stewardess whose current predicament could easily be alleviated by the purchase of 10 Dreamliners using British aid money. But that's not the case. The victims are common people, such as the 2 million Ethiopian farmers your "visionary" TPLF regime forced off their land to make way for Arab-owned rice plantations and the construction of scam dams ...etc.

Image

Conformist
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Conformist » 18 Jul 2013, 20:58

Ethoash wrote:Arab Gorash,
I am not good at anything but this is simple math.

Ethiopia get 2 billion dollars Aid money

And Ethiopia bought 2 billion dollars worth of 787

Now is that no zero balance.

Wait I will super dumb it for u.

British give u money to buy ten milk cow

Now if u r stupid u buy ten milk cow but u will not get milk because before the cow give u milk they have to half Calf....for that u need bull...

Now if u r smart u buy one bull and nine cow so that u will not need British aid next time ..

Now if u invest two billion on ten 787 those plane will generate profit for next 20 years ..

Unlike if use the aid money directly with in one or two years the money will run out the people still need more aid.

The arrogance of your leaders is they think of everything in terms of political prestige. They bought the 787 because they thought it was prestigious, ignoring the fact that a new design always has bugs to be ironed out. The wisest purchase at Ethiopia's level would have been the Airbus A330, the same as the 787, except its greater fuel consumption.

By purchasing the A330 they would have had aircraft without the massive problems of the 787, no grounding, no fire, the planes would be flying day and night. The A330 has been flying for 20 years.

They look way above their level, they want to feel good by buying what Japan bought, the result is humiliation, now insurers are saying the 787 that burned in London might be a write off, is Tigrayan empty pride worth all of that?

Ethoash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Ethoash » 18 Jul 2013, 22:04

Okay my dreast Arab Gorash

Simple math

2billion dollars divided by 35 million people would be 57 dollars each mind u this 57 dollars would be in four years.

To my dearest Mr.compost,

I got ur point Ethiopia should by land line telephone then wireless phone or Internet because land line is proven technology.

My mr.composter, I don't know about u but who the hell r Japan?they r just like us two hand and two leg... Beside we r competeing airline business Ethiopia have many advantage over many western airlines. Our workforce cost is low, electricity low, land price low they only expanse we have is gas money.

About buying airbus then we have to change every thing from simple tool, many other thing to accommodate the airbus technology beside it would be highly costly to operate both airbus and Boeing..

Why not go to any business see for urself Olympic is sponsored by coke cola so u only get one cola not Pepsi ( u can unless check this) but Saudi also doesn't have coke ola but Pepsi..( might be religion ) but they have their own reason ...

Beside American become America by being risk taker...today 7 billion world know Ethiopia have airlines that goodwill will carry us over.. We always buy another plane but there is always one 787 and we r the first to get it..

We r taking risk with Boeing and for sure it will pay off.. Always u must be the first to get in...in fact Ethiopia should buy Boeing share while it is low...

America spend trillion to go to mars... U dont want us to take risk even with Boeing where all the risk is insured of course accident might happend the other day the plane that crushed is not 787 so go figure

One last thing u guys boycotting Ethiopian airlines so what is all this new love for ARL..

We have sixty years with Boeing we can't cut our lose and run what kind of people u think we r ... We are Ethiopian this great culture we have to stick it to think and thin will carry us... I know u believe in cut throat ... I don't ...

We have to give Boeing all the chance they deserve and whatever the CEO take root that root we going to take but no rushing him or pushing him... To ur direction that is why he is CEO ...if this CEO pass this test he will be the best CEO Ethiopia ever had... And book must be written on based his life.. And student must learn about him.

Arba_Gorash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Arba_Gorash » 18 Jul 2013, 22:18

Adwanash,
Although your definition of the letter "A" in the word Airlines as just "three sticks" never resonated with me, but I still wish that you were the CEO of the Ethiopian Airlines instead of your uncle, because at least you seem to be smarter than all the monkeys in the world put together. :razz:

Arba_Gorash
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Arba_Gorash » 19 Jul 2013, 03:30

BBC: Aid for Political Repression in Ethiopia

Fiyameta
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Fiyameta » 14 Mar 2019, 16:53

It was all smoke and ashes baby! :oops: :oops: :oops:

Aragaw
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Aragaw » 14 Mar 2019, 17:30

Ethoash wrote:
18 Jul 2013, 10:44
Converter, here is ur answer


Corrosion and fatigue in a structure add significantly to the nonroutine maintenance burden on an operator. Nonroutine maintenance frequently doubles or even triples the total labor hours expended during a maintenance check. With the expanded use of composites and titanium combined with greater discipline in usage of aluminum, Boeing expects the 787 to have much lower nonroutine labor costs than a more conventional metallic airframe.

In addition to using a robust structural design in damage-prone areas, such as passenger and cargo doors, the 787 has been designed from the start with the capability to be repaired in exactly the same manner that airlines would repair an airplane today — with bolted repairs. The ability to perform bolted repairs in composite structure is service-proven on the 777 and offers comparable repair times and skills as employed on metallic airplanes. (By design, bolted repairs in composite structure can be permanent and damage tolerant, just as they can be on a metal structure.)

In addition, airlines have the option to perform bonded composite repairs, which offer improved aerodynamic and aesthetic finish. These repairs are permanent, damage tolerant, and do not require an autoclave. While a typical bonded repair may require 24 or more hours of airplane downtime, Boeing has taken advantage of the properties of composites to develop a new line of maintenance repair capability that requires less than an hour to apply. This rapid composite repair technique offers temporary repair capability to get an airplane flying again quickly, despite minor damage that might ground an aluminum airplane.

In total, the reduced risk of corrosion and fatigue associated with composites combined with the composite repair techniques described will lower overall maintenance costs and maximize airline revenue by keeping airplanes flying as much as possible. (Continue to next page)
Ashtray,

plagiarism at its best. You know copying someone else work doesn't make you smart. Everyone knows you are not capable of this kind analysis

Hawzen
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Hawzen » 14 Mar 2019, 18:23

Halafi Mengedi wrote:
18 Jul 2013, 12:26
Do you know what priorities and capital budgeting are???

I understand about the Eritreans because they are jealous any good thing happened in Ethiopia but for the Ethiopians shame on you to criticize this investment. First of all, the aid is not real aid because Ethiopia earned it by sending its youths to monitor peace around Africa for the interest of UN and the western countries at very cheap price. Most importantly the money comes from different countries in different names can be used based what the government wants to accomplish for the fiscal year or a period of years. In this case the British aid money was spent to expand the existing company that is Ethiopian air lines because the Government sees the company profitable and it has high demand for their service. All Ethiopians should applause to the financial analysist who made the decision to invest the money to make more money and create more employment in the country and collect taxes from the workers as the form of revenue for the Federal and state to use for the public usages.

What does matter whether the Government spend the money on importing medicine or capital goods or agricultural capital goods, all are the same but the Government has its own priorities how they should allocate resources based the need of the country and they purchased airline to capture more market and satisfy their loyal customers and I am very pleased to see the money was invested very wisely for the benefit of all Ethiopians years to come.

If the money was spent to import luxury goods or luxury entertainment villas and Golf course the high raking people to benefit it then there is a legitimate criticism for their bad decision making. Let say if the money was give to help the poor people of Ethiopia then the Government can use the hard currency to invest it where it can generate more money like the Airline and then the government can buy food from the local farmers to distribute to the intended people. This is very shroud business decision by converting the local currency for hard currency and invest it to import capital goods the country cannot manufacture it at home.
Once upon a time, brother Ayte Halafi used to love and defend Ethiopia and the government of Ethiopia...He was acting more Ethiopian than the real Ethiopians... :lol: :lol: He even went all the way to call Eritreans jealous of any good things that happen in Ethiopia...Now time has changed, he hates Ethiopia and the government of Ethiopia so much since his TPLF have been forced to be caged in Mekelle Holes..... What a change!!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

God bless Ethiopia!

Dedebit is always dedeb
R.I.P Abay Tigray and TPLF

Abe Abraham
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Abe Abraham » 14 Mar 2019, 20:04

British aid money flows into offshore fund

More than £160 million of British foreign aid is being channelled through an offshore investment fund used to buy Boeing jets for an African airline and other big business deals
.

Fed_Up
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Fed_Up » 14 Mar 2019, 21:31

Oh mama!! Tplfists did it again!! Just like back in the bush days. This SOBs don’t even put that money to buy Dreamliner but they allocate the hard begged money to their offshore accounts.

I saw thieves but thie tplfists are upscale to the awful standards.

AgameWoch are born lair, thieves and unprincipled.

I am just sayin

getreal
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by getreal » 14 Mar 2019, 21:38

EthoIdiot,

This is plagiarism, you dumbf'uck!!!

Ethoash wrote:
18 Jul 2013, 10:44
Converter, here is ur answer


Corrosion and fatigue in a structure add significantly to the nonroutine maintenance burden on an operator. Nonroutine maintenance frequently doubles or even triples the total labor hours expended during a maintenance check. With the expanded use of composites and titanium combined with greater discipline in usage of aluminum, Boeing expects the 787 to have much lower nonroutine labor costs than a more conventional metallic airframe.

In addition to using a robust structural design in damage-prone areas, such as passenger and cargo doors, the 787 has been designed from the start with the capability to be repaired in exactly the same manner that airlines would repair an airplane today — with bolted repairs. The ability to perform bolted repairs in composite structure is service-proven on the 777 and offers comparable repair times and skills as employed on metallic airplanes. (By design, bolted repairs in composite structure can be permanent and damage tolerant, just as they can be on a metal structure.)

In addition, airlines have the option to perform bonded composite repairs, which offer improved aerodynamic and aesthetic finish. These repairs are permanent, damage tolerant, and do not require an autoclave. While a typical bonded repair may require 24 or more hours of airplane downtime, Boeing has taken advantage of the properties of composites to develop a new line of maintenance repair capability that requires less than an hour to apply. This rapid composite repair technique offers temporary repair capability to get an airplane flying again quickly, despite minor damage that might ground an aluminum airplane.

In total, the reduced risk of corrosion and fatigue associated with composites combined with the composite repair techniques described will lower overall maintenance costs and maximize airline revenue by keeping airplanes flying as much as possible. (Continue to next page)

Aragaw
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Posts: 16360
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Re: How British Aid was Diverted to buy the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Dreamliners

Post by Aragaw » 14 Mar 2019, 23:12

Ethoash wrote:
18 Jul 2013, 19:03
Arab Gorash,
I am not good at anything but this is simple math.

Ethiopia get 2 billion dollars Aid money

And Ethiopia bought 2 billion dollars worth of 787

Now is that no zero balance.

Wait I will super dumb it for u.

British give u money to buy ten milk cow

Now if u r stupid u buy ten milk cow but u will not get milk because before the cow give u milk they have to half Calf....for that u need bull...

Now if u r smart u buy one bull and nine cow so that u will not need British aid next time ..

Now if u invest two billion on ten 787 those plane will generate profit for next 20 years ..

Unlike if use the aid money directly with in one or two years the money will run out the people still need more aid.
Ashtray, Thank you for simplify it for me. Now it makes a lot of sense. Honestly with out you this forum could have been boring. Thank you Genius !!!

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