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Horus
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Posts: 23275
Joined: 19 Oct 2013, 19:34

ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 14:56

ቆጮ አስተማማኝ ምግብ ብቻ ሳይሆን ሃይል ሰጪ ፓወር ፉድ ነው ። በጥቂት አመታት የ100 ሚሊዮን ኢትዮጵያዊያን ምግብ ይሆናል፣ የእንሰት እና ቆጮ ሳይንስ ባፍጣኝ እያደገ በአግሮ ኢንዱስትሪ ድረጃ ፕሮሴስድና ፓኬጅድ ሆኖ ላለም ገበያ እየቀረበው ነው ። የእንሰት ኢንዱስትሪ የሚቀጥለው የህዝባችን የምግብ አብዮት ነው!! ኤቦ ዬቦ!!

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-60074407

Last edited by Horus on 23 Jan 2022, 15:22, edited 1 time in total.


Horus
Senior Member+
Posts: 23275
Joined: 19 Oct 2013, 19:34

Re: ቆጮ አንድ መቶ ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 15:19

ኧሰት አዮ! እንሰት እናት! Mother Enset!! በመጨረሻ ኃሏን አሳየች !!

DefendTheTruth
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Posts: 6290
Joined: 08 Mar 2014, 16:32

Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by DefendTheTruth » 23 Jan 2022, 16:17

Horus,

I came across the following article in the internet today and a short sentence therein reminded me a song I heard about while I was young. The song was used by the people in the year 1977, E. C. (1984 according G. C), when a major drought striked Ethiopia and caused a severe hunger, causing of death of many people, among others.

The song was like:

አመም በደለምቴ 77ት ደርቤ፣ ጣፊ ኬ አብደቴ ዳኢማ ኬ ማሊፍ ገንቴ ያወርቄ
(how severe was it for you (enset), to rely on Teff and forget your children, (speaking of inset). It was called back then Worqie song. Even workie couldn't sustain the then severe hunger, is the central message.

That song has now found its foundation also in science, according to the short sentence I am referring to here.
That's why they call it the tree against hunger."
False banana: Is Ethiopia's enset 'wondercrop' for climate change?

Horus
Senior Member+
Posts: 23275
Joined: 19 Oct 2013, 19:34

Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 17:52

ዲፌንድ ዘ ትሩዝ፣

በትክክል! ይህ የአረጋሀኝ ፍቃዱ (በቅርብ በኮቪድ ሞተ) ዘፈን ስለ 1977 ነው የሚተርከው ። አው በጉራጌ አካባቢ ያሉት ኦሮሞች ቆጮን ወርቄ የሚሉት ይመስለኛል። እመነኝ አሁን የመስኖ ቴክኖሎጂ እየሰፋ ሲሄድ አይደለም በደቡብና መሃል ኢትዮጵያ በሰሜን ኢትዮጵያ ይተከላል። እንሰት የምግብ ፕላንት ብቻ አይደለም፣ የአረንጓዴ ምድር ፕሮጀክትም ነው። ሰው አያውቅም እንጂ በዙ የፕላንት ሳይንስ አግሮኖሚካል ጥናት ተደርጎበት ምርጥ ዘሮቹ ሁሉ ተለይተው በሽታ የሚከላከሉ ዘርያዎች ተለይተዋል ። በሌላ በኩል የፕሮሴሱ ኬሚስትሪና ቴክኖሎጂ ብዙ ተፈስፏል ። የወልቂጤና አዋሳ ዩኒቭርሲቲዎች እየመሩ ነው። አሁን በሜካናይዘድ እርሻ ደረጃ በቅርቡ ሲያድግ እናያለን ። በጉራጌኛ የእንሰት ተክል ተጋን ይባላል፣ ቀጥታ ትርጉሙ garden ማለት ነው ። ስለዚህ የእንሰት እርሻ ጋርደኒንግ ነው ። አሁን ክትፎ በቆጮ የማይበላ ኢትዮጵያዊ የለም! ሁሉ ነገር ይለወጣል!!! በነገራችን ላይ ያቤሎ አሁንም ቆጮ በሊታ እያለ ነው የሚሰድበኝ ፣ እሱ ኤምፒቲ ካሎሬ ያረጀ ስንዴ እየበላ !!!

Guest1
Member
Posts: 1926
Joined: 28 Dec 2006, 01:02

Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Guest1 » 23 Jan 2022, 18:22

ከ2ተኛው የአለም ጦርነት ብኋላ ረሃብ የተከሰተው በአፍሪካና 3ተኛ አለም በሚባሉ አገሮች ብቻ!!! መፍትሄው ምንድነው? ጤፍ አይደለም። ቆጮ ነው? እንሳቅ እንጂ! ክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክ
  • Date Event Location Death toll (where known; estimated)
    2200–2100 BCE The 4.2-kiloyear event caused famines and civilizational collapse worldwide global
    441 BCE The first famine recorded in ancient Rome. Ancient Rome[1]
    26 BCE Famine recorded throughout Near East and Levant, as recorded by Josephus Judea 20,000+
    370 CE Famine in Phrygia Phrygia
    372–373 Famine in Edessa Edessa
    400–800 Various famines in Western Europe associated with the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and its sack by Alaric I. Between 400 and 800 AD, the population of the city of Rome fell by over 90%, mainly because of famine and plague.[citation needed] Western Europe
    470 Famine Gaul
    535–536 Extreme weather events of 535–536 Global
    585 Famine Gaul
    639 Famine in Arabia during the Caliphate of Umar ibn al-Khattab[2] Arabia
    750s Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus)[3]
    779 Famine Francia
    792–793 Famine Francia
    800–1000 Severe drought killed millions of Maya people due to famine and thirst and initiated a cascade of internal collapses that destroyed their civilization[4] Mayan areas of Mesoamerica 1,000,000+
    805–806 Famine Francia
    875–884 Peasant rebellion in China inspired by famine;[5][6] Huang Chao captured capital China

    927–928 Caused by four months of frost[7][8] Byzantine Empire
    963–969 Famine Egypt
    1005–1006 Europe[9]
    1016 Famine throughout Europe[10] Europe
    1025 Famine Egypt
    1051 Famine forced the Toltecs to migrate from a stricken region in what is now central Mexico[11] Mexico (present day)
    1055–1056 Famine Egypt
    1064–1072 Seven years' famine in Egypt [12][13] Egypt 40,000[12]
    1069–1070 Harrying of the North England 100,000
    1097 Famine and plague [14] France 100,000
    1124–1126 Famine Europe
    1143–1147 Famine Europe
    1150–1151 Famine Europe
    1161–1162 Famine Aquitaine
    1181 Yōwa famine Japan 42,300
    1196–1197 Famine Europe
    1199–1202 Famine Egypt 100,000
    1224–1226 Famine Europe
    1230 Famine in the Republic of Novgorod[citation needed] Russia
    1230–1231 The Kanki famine, possibly the worst famine in Japan's history.[15] Caused by volcanic eruptions.[16] Japan 2,000,000
    1235 Famine in England[17] England 20,000 in London
    1256–1258 Famine in Italy, Spain, Portugal and England[18] Europe
    1264 Famine Egypt
    1275–1277 Famine[19] Italy
    1275–1299 Collapse of the Anasazi civilization, widespread famine occurred[20] United States (present day)
    1285–1286 Famine[19] Italy
    1294 Famine Egypt
    1302–1303 Famine in Spain and Italy[19] Europe
    1304 Famine France
    1305 Famine France
    1310 Famine France

    1315–1317 Great Famine of 1315–1317 Europe[21]
    7,500,000
    1321 Famine England
    1328–1330 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland[19] Europe
    1330–1333 Famine France
    1333–1337 Chinese famine of 1333–1337 China[22] 6,000,000
    1339–1340 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland[19] Europe
    1344–1345 Famine in India, under the regime of Muhammad bin Tughluq[citation needed] India
    1346–1347 Famine in France, Italy and Spain[19] Europe
    1349–1351 Famine France
    1351 Famine England
    1358–1360 Famine France
    1369 Famine England
    1371 Famine France
    1374–1375 Famine in France, Italy and Spain[19] Europe
    1374–1375 Famine Egypt
    1387 After Timur the Lame left Asia Minor, severe famine ensued[citation needed] Anatolia
    1390–1391 Famine France
    1394–1396 Famine Egypt
    1396–1407 The Durga Devi famine India[23][10]
    1403–1404 Famine Egypt
    1432–1434 The Hungry Years Czech Republic (present-day)
    1437–1438 Famine in France, Holy Roman Empire, and Britain Europe
    1441 Famine in Mayapan Mexico[24]
    1450–1454 Famine in the Aztec Empire,[25] interpreted as the gods' need for sacrifices.[26] Mexico (present day)
    1460–1461 Kanshō famine in Japan[citation needed] Japan 82,000
    1472–1474 Famine[27] Italy
    1476 Famine[27] Italy
    1482–1484 Famine[27] Italy
    1493 Famine[27] Italy
    1502–1505 Famine[27] Italy
    1504 Spain[28]
    1518 Venice[citation needed] Italy (present day)
    1521–1523 Famine in the Low Countries, Ireland and the Nordic Countries Europe
    1527–1530 Famine[27] Italy
    1528 Famine in Languedoc France[29]
    1533–1534 Famine[27] Italy
    1535 Famine in Ethiopia Ethiopia
    1539–1540 Famine[27] Italy
    1540 Tenbun famine [ja] Japan
    1544–1545 Famine[27] Italy
    1550–1552 Famine[27] Italy
    1558–1560 Famine[27] Italy
    1567–1570 Famine in Harar, combined with plague[citation needed]. Emir of Harar died. Ethiopia
    1569–1574 Pan-European famine, including Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Low Countries, Nordic Countries, Russia and mostly east off Ukraine[27] Europe
    1585–1587 Pan-European famine, including Italy, France, Low Countries, Britain and Ireland[27] Europe
    1590–1598 Pan-European famine, including Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Britain and the Nordic countries[27] Europe
    1600–1601 Famine in Emilia and southern Lombardy[30] Italy
    1601–1603 One of the worst famines in all of Russian history, with as many as 100,000 in Moscow and up to one-third of Tsar Godunov's subjects killed; see Russian famine of 1601–03.[31][32] The same famine killed about half of the Estonian population. Russia 2,000,000
    1607–1608 Famine[27] Italy
    1618–1648 Famines in Europe caused by Thirty Years' War Europe
    1618–1622 Famine[27] Italy
    1619 Famine in Japan. During the Tokugawa period, there were 154 famines, of which 21 were widespread and serious.[33] Japan
    1628–1632 Famine[27] Italy
    1630–1632 Deccan famine of 1630–1632 India 7,400,000
    1630–1631 Famine in north-west China China
    1640–1643 Kan'ei Great Famine Japan 50,000-100,000
    1648–1649 Famine[27] Italy
    1648–1660 Poland lost an estimated 1/3 of its population due to wars, famine, and plague[citation needed] Poland
    1649 Famine in northern England [34] England
    1650–1652 Famine in the east of France [35] France
    1651–1653 Famine throughout much of Ireland during the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland[36] Ireland
    1661 Famine in India, due to lack of any rainfall for two years[37][10] India
    1670s – 1680s Plague and famines in Spain[citation needed] Spain
    1670–1671 Kyungshin Famine Korea 1,000,000 - 1,500,000
    1672 Famine in southern Italy[30] Italy
    1678–1679 Famine[27] Italy
    1680 Famine in Sardinia[38] Italy (present day) 80,000[39]
    1680s Famine in Sahel[35] West Africa
    1690s Famine throughout Scotland which killed 5–15% of the population [40] Scotland 60,000–180,000
    1693–1694 Between 1.3 and 1.5 million French died in the fr:grande famine de 1693-1694 France 1,300,000[41][42]
    1693–1695 Famine[27] Italy
    1695–1697 Great Famine of Estonia killed about a fifth of Estonian and Livonian population (70,000–75,000 people). Famine also hit Sweden (80,000–100,000 dead) The Swedish Empire, of which Swedish Estonia and Swedish Livonia were dominions at that time 150,000–175,000[citation needed]
    1696–1697 Great Famine of Finland wiped out almost a third of the population[43] Finland, then part of Sweden proper 150,000
    1702–1704 Famine in Deccan[44] India 2,000,000[44]
    1708–1711 Famine in East Prussia killed 250,000 people or 41% of its population.[45] According to other sources the great mortality was due to plague (disease), which between 1709 and 1711 killed about 200,000 – 250,000 out of 600,000 inhabitants of East Prussia.[46] The Great Northern War plague outbreak of 1708-1712 also affected East Prussia. East Prussia 250,000
    1709 Famine[27] Italy
    1709–1710 The fr:Grande famine de 1709 France[47] 600,000
    1716 Famine[27] Italy
    1722 Arabia[48]
    1724 Famine[27] Italy
    1727–1728 Famine in the English Midlands[49] England
    1732–1733 Kyōhō famine Japan 12,172–169,000[50]
    1738–1756 Famine in West Africa, half the population of Timbuktu died of starvation[51] West Africa
    1740–1741 Irish Famine (1740–1741) Ireland 300,000–480,000
    1750–1756 Famine in the Senegambia region [52] Senegal, Gambia (present day)
    1764 Famine in Naples[53][27] Italy (present day)
    1767 Famine[27] Italy
    1769–1773 Great Bengal famine of 1770,[10] 10 million dead (one third of population) India, Bangladesh (present day) 10,000,000
    1770–1771 Famines in Czech lands killed hundreds of thousands people Czech Republic (present day) 100,000+
    1771–1772 Famine in Saxony and southern Germany[citation needed] Germany
    1773 Famine in Sweden[54] Sweden
    1779 Famine in Rabat Morocco[55]
    1780s Great Tenmei famine Japan 20,000 – 920,000
    1783 Famine in Iceland caused by Laki eruption killed one-fifth of Iceland's population[56] Iceland
    1783–1784 Chalisa famine India 11,000,000[57]
    1784 Widespread famine throughout Egypt[58] Egypt
    1784–1785 Famine in Tunisia[citation needed] Tunisia
    1788 The two years previous to the French Revolution saw bad harvests and harsh winters, possibly because of a strong El Niño cycle[59] or caused by the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland.[60][61] France
    1789 Famine in Ethiopia afflicted "amhara/tigray north" Ethiopia
    1789–1793 Doji bara famine or Skull famine India 11,000,000
    1801 Famine[27] Italy
    1804–1872, 1913 A series of 14 famines in Austrian Galicia Poland, Ukraine (present day) 400,000-550,000
    1810, 1811, 1846, and 1849 Four famines in China China 45,000,000[62]
    1811–1812 Famine devastated Madrid[63] Spain 20,000[64]
    1815 Eruption of Tambora, Indonesia. Tens of thousands died in subsequent famine Indonesia 10,000
    1816–1817 Year Without a Summer Europe 65,000
    1830–1833 Claimed to have killed 42% of the population Cape Verde 30,000[65]
    1832–1833 Guntur famine of 1832 India 150,000
    1833–1837 Tenpō famine Japan
    1837–1838 Agra famine of 1837–1838 India 800,000
    1845–1857 Highland Potato Famine Scotland
    1845–1849 Great Famine in Ireland killed more than 1 million people. Between 1.5–2 million people forced to emigrate[66] Ireland 1,000,000+
    1846 Famine led to the peasant revolt known as "Maria da Fonte" in the north of Portugal[citation needed] Portugal
    1846-1848 The Newfoundland Potato Famine, related to the Irish Potato Famine. Newfoundland,present-day Canada
    1849–1850 Demak and Grobogan in Central Java, caused by four successive crop failures due to drought. Indonesia 83,000[67]
    1850–1873 As a result of the Taiping Rebellion, drought, and famine, the population of China dropped by more than 60 million[68] China 60,000,000
    1860–1861 Upper Doab famine of 1860–1861 India 2,000,000
    1863–1867 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 30,000[69]
    1866 Orissa famine of 1866 India 1,000,000[70]
    1866–1868 Finnish famine of 1866–1868. About 15% of the entire population died Finland 150,000+
    1866–1868 Famine in French Algeria French Algeria 820,000
    1867–1869 Swedish famine of 1867–1869. Sweden
    1869 Rajputana famine of 1869 India 1,500,000[70]
    1870–1872 Persian famine of 1870–1872 Iran 200,000-3,000,000 Estimates vary [71]
    1873–1874 Famine in Anatolia caused by drought and floods[72][73] Turkey (present day)
    1873–1874 Bihar famine of 1873–1874 India
    1876–1879 Famine in India, China, Brazil, Northern Africa (and other countries). Famine in northern China killed 9–13 million people.[74] 5.5 million died in the Great Famine of 1876–78 in India. 500,000 died in Brazil. British policies and drought were responsible for the deaths in India.[75][76] The famine in China was a result of drought influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.[77] In Brazil, Grande Seca killed probably more than 400.000 people. India, China, Brazil, Northern Africa (and other countries). 15,000,000–19,000,000 in Northern China, India and Brazil.
    1878–1880 St. Lawrence Island famine, Alaska[78] United States 1,000
    1879 1879 Famine in Ireland. Unlike previous famines, this famine mainly caused hunger and food shortages but little mortality. Ireland
    1888–1889 Famine in Orrisa, Ganjam and Northern Bihar India 150,000
    1888–1892 Ethiopian Great famine. About one-third of the population died.[79][80] Conditions worsen with cholera outbreaks (1889–92), a typhus epidemic, and a major smallpox epidemic (1889–90). Ethiopia 1,000,000
    1891–1892 Russian famine of 1891–1892. Beginning along the Volga River and spreading to the Urals and the Black Sea. Russia 375,000–500,000[81][82]
    1895–1898 Famine during the Cuban War of Independence Cuba 200,000–300,000
    1896–1897 Famine in northern China leading in part to the Boxer Rebellion China
    1896–1902 Indian famine of 1896–1897 and Indian famine of 1899–1900 due to drought and British policies.[76][83][84] India 2,000,000 (British territories), mortality unknown in princely states
    1900–1903 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 11,000–20,000[69]
    1904–1906 Famine in Spain.[85][86][87] Spain
    1907, 1911 Famines in east-central China China 25,000,000 [88]
    1914–1918 Mount Lebanon famine during World War I which was caused by an Entente powers and Ottoman Turk blockade of food and to a swarm of locusts which killed up to 200,000 people, estimated to be half of the Mount Lebanon population[89] Lebanon 200,000
    1914–1919 Famine caused by the Allied blockade of Germany during World War I until Germany signed the Treaty of Versailles.[90] Germany 763,000
    1917 Famine in German East Africa German East Africa 300,000
    1917–1919 Persian famine of 1917–1919 Iran 2,000,000,[91] but estimates range as high as 10,000,000[92]
    1918–1919 Rumanura famine in Ruanda-Burundi, causing large migrations to the Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day)[citation needed]
    1919–1922 Kazakh famine of 1919–1922. A series of famines in Turkestan at the time of the Bolshevik revolution killed about a sixth of the population Turkestan [93]
    1920–1921 Famine in northern China China 500,000
    1920–1922 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 24,000–25,000[69]
    1921 Russian famine of 1921–1922 Russia 5,000,000[94]
    1921–1922 1921–1922 famine in Tatarstan Russia 500,000–2,000,000[95]
    1924–1925 Famine in Volga German colonies in Russia. One-third of the entire population perished[96][unreliable source?][unreliable source?] Russia
    1924–1925 Minor famine in Ireland due to heavy rain Irish Free State[citation needed]
    1928–1929 Famine in Ruanda-Burundi, causing large migrations to the Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day)
    1928–1930 Chinese famine of 1928–1930 in northern China. The drought resulted in million of deaths China 3,000,000-10,000,000
    1930–1931 Famine Madagascar 32,000
    1932–1933 Soviet famine of 1932–1933, including famine in Ukraine, caused by deliberate Soviet collectivization of scarce food resources.[97] Russian SFSR and Ukrainian SSR 7,000,000[98]

    1936 Famine in China China 5,000,000[99]
    1940–1943 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 20,000[69]
    1940–1945 Famine in Warsaw Ghetto, as well as other ghettos and concentration camps (note: this famine was the result of deliberate denial of food to ghetto residents on the part of Nazis).[100] Occupied Poland
    1940–1948 Famine in Morocco between 1940 and 1948, because of refueling system installed by France.[101] Morocco 200,000
    1941–1944 Leningrad famine caused by a 900-day blockade by German troops. About one million Leningrad residents starved, froze, or were bombed to death in the winter of 1941–42, when supply routes to the city were cut off and temperatures dropped to −40 °C (−40 °F).[102] According to other estimates about 800,000 out of an immediate pre-siege population of about 2.5 million perished.[103] Soviet Union 800,000–1,000,000
    1941–1944 Famine in Greece caused by the Axis occupation.[104][105] Greece 300,000
    1941–1942 Famine in Kharkiv (Kharkov). In a city with a population of about 450,000 while under German occupation, there was a famine starting in the winter of 1941–42 that lasted until the end of September 1942. The local administration recorded 19,284 deaths between the second half of December 1941 and the second half of September 1942, thereof 11,918 (59.6%) from hunger.[106] The Foreign Office representative at Army High Command 6 noted on 25.03.1942 that according to reports reaching municipal authorities at least 50 people were dying of hunger every day, and that the true number might be much higher as in many cases the cause of death was stated as "unknown" and besides many deaths were not reported.[107] According to Soviet sources about 70–80,000 people died of starvation in Kharkov during the occupation by Nazi Germany.[108] Soviet Union 11,918–80,000
    1941-1943 Famine in Kyiv (Kiev). On April 1, 1942, well after the first winter of famine, Kiev officially had about 352,000 inhabitants. In the middle of 1943—more than four months before the end of German rule—the city officially had about 295,600.Death by starvation was not the only reason for the rapid decline in population: deportation to Germany and Nazi shootings also played their part. Nevertheless, starvation was an important factor.[109] Soviet Union
    1942–1943 Chinese famine of 1942–1943 Henan, China 2,000,000–3,000,000
    1942–1943 Iranian famine of 1942–1943 Iran 3,000,000[110][better source needed]
    1943 Bengal famine of 1943 Bengal, India, Bangladesh 2,100,000
    1943–1944 Ruzagayura famine in Ruanda-Urundi, causing emigrations to Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day) 36,000–50,000
    1943–1945 Famine in Hadhramaut Yemen (present day) 10,000[111][112]
    1944–1945 Java under Japanese occupation Java, Indonesia 2,400,000[113]
    1944 Dutch famine of 1944 during World War II Netherlands 20,000
    1945 Vietnamese Famine of 1945 Vietnam 600,000–2,000,000[114]
    1945-1947 Famine in Königsberg (Kaliningrad) Soviet Union 57,000−76,500[115]
    1946-1947 German "Hungerwinter" Germany > 100,000[116]
    1946–1947 Soviet famine of 1946–1947 Soviet Union 1,000,000–1,500,000[117][118]
    1946–1948 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 30,000[69]
    1949 Nyasaland Famine 1949 Malawi 200
    1950 1950 Canadian caribou famine Canada 60

    &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
    1958 Famine in Tigray Ethiopia 100,000
    1959–1961 The Great Chinese Famine[119][120][121] Some researchers also include the year 1958 or 1962. China (mainland) 15,000,000–55,000,000[120][122][123]
    1966–1967 Lombok, drought and malnutrition, exacerbated by restrictions on regional rice trade Indonesia 50,000[124]
    1967–1970 Biafran famine caused by Nigerian blockade Nigeria 2,000,000
    1968–1972 Sahel drought created a famine that killed a million people[125] Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger and Burkina Faso 1,000,000[citation needed]
    1971–1973 Afghanistan drought Afghanistan Thousand
    1972–1973 Famine in Ethiopia caused by drought and poor governance; failure of the government to handle this crisis led to the fall of Haile Selassie and to Derg rule Ethiopia 60,000[126]
    1973 Darfur drought Darfur, Sudan Thousand
    1974 Bangladesh famine of 1974 Bangladesh 27,000-1,500,000[citation needed]
    1975–1979 Khmer Rouge. A maximum estimate of 500,000 Cambodians lost their lives to famine Cambodia 500,000[127]
    1980–1981 Caused by drought and conflict[126] Uganda 30,000[126]
    1982–1985 Famine caused by the Mozambican Civil War Mozambique 100,000
    1983–1985 1983–1985 famine in Ethiopia Ethiopia 400,000–600,000[128]
    1984–1985 Famine caused by drought, economic crisis and the Second Sudanese Civil War Sudan 240,000
    1988 Famine caused by the Second Sudanese Civil War Sudan 100,000
    1991–1992 Famine in Somalia caused by drought and civil war[126] Somalia 300,000[126]
    1993 1993 Sudan famine Sudan
    1994–1998 North Korean famine.[129][130] Scholars estimate 600,000 died of starvation (other estimates range from 200,000 to 3.5 million).[131] North Korea 200,000–3,500,000
    1998 1998 Sudan famine caused by war and drought Sudan 70,000[126]
    1998 1998 Afghanistan famine Afghanistan Thousand
    1998–2000 Famine in Ethiopia. The situation worsened by Eritrean–Ethiopian War Ethiopia
    1998–2004 Second Congo War. 2.7 million people died, mostly from starvation and disease Democratic Republic of the Congo 2,700,000
    2003–2005 Famine during the War in Darfur Sudan 200,000
    2005–2006 2005–2006 Niger food crisis. At least three million were affected in Niger and 10 million throughout West Africa[citation needed] Niger and West Africa
    2011–2012 Famine in Somalia, brought on by the 2011 East Africa drought[132] Somalia 285,000
    2012 Famine in West Africa, brought on by the 2012 Sahel drought[133] Senegal, Gambia, Niger, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso
    2016–present Famine in Yemen, arising from the Yemeni Civil War and the subsequent blockade of Yemen by Saudi Arabia Yemen 85,000 children[134] Unknown number of adults.
    2017–present Famine in South Sudan[135] Famine in Somalia, due to 2017 Somalian drought. Famine in Nigeria South Sudan, Unity State, Somalia, and Nigeria.
    2020–present Famine in the Tigray War Tigray, Ethiopia

Guest1
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Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Guest1 » 23 Jan 2022, 18:22

ከ2ተኛው የአለም ጦርነት ብኋላ ረሃብ የተከሰተው በአፍሪካና 3ተኛ አለም በሚባሉ አገሮች ብቻ!!! መፍትሄው ምንድነው? ጤፍ አይደለም። ቆጮ ነው? እንሳቅ እንጂ! ክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክክ
  • Date Event Location Death toll (where known; estimated)
    2200–2100 BCE The 4.2-kiloyear event caused famines and civilizational collapse worldwide global
    441 BCE The first famine recorded in ancient Rome. Ancient Rome[1]
    26 BCE Famine recorded throughout Near East and Levant, as recorded by Josephus Judea 20,000+
    370 CE Famine in Phrygia Phrygia
    372–373 Famine in Edessa Edessa
    400–800 Various famines in Western Europe associated with the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and its sack by Alaric I. Between 400 and 800 AD, the population of the city of Rome fell by over 90%, mainly because of famine and plague.[citation needed] Western Europe
    470 Famine Gaul
    535–536 Extreme weather events of 535–536 Global
    585 Famine Gaul
    639 Famine in Arabia during the Caliphate of Umar ibn al-Khattab[2] Arabia
    750s Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus)[3]
    779 Famine Francia
    792–793 Famine Francia
    800–1000 Severe drought killed millions of Maya people due to famine and thirst and initiated a cascade of internal collapses that destroyed their civilization[4] Mayan areas of Mesoamerica 1,000,000+
    805–806 Famine Francia
    875–884 Peasant rebellion in China inspired by famine;[5][6] Huang Chao captured capital China

    927–928 Caused by four months of frost[7][8] Byzantine Empire
    963–969 Famine Egypt
    1005–1006 Europe[9]
    1016 Famine throughout Europe[10] Europe
    1025 Famine Egypt
    1051 Famine forced the Toltecs to migrate from a stricken region in what is now central Mexico[11] Mexico (present day)
    1055–1056 Famine Egypt
    1064–1072 Seven years' famine in Egypt [12][13] Egypt 40,000[12]
    1069–1070 Harrying of the North England 100,000
    1097 Famine and plague [14] France 100,000
    1124–1126 Famine Europe
    1143–1147 Famine Europe
    1150–1151 Famine Europe
    1161–1162 Famine Aquitaine
    1181 Yōwa famine Japan 42,300
    1196–1197 Famine Europe
    1199–1202 Famine Egypt 100,000
    1224–1226 Famine Europe
    1230 Famine in the Republic of Novgorod[citation needed] Russia
    1230–1231 The Kanki famine, possibly the worst famine in Japan's history.[15] Caused by volcanic eruptions.[16] Japan 2,000,000
    1235 Famine in England[17] England 20,000 in London
    1256–1258 Famine in Italy, Spain, Portugal and England[18] Europe
    1264 Famine Egypt
    1275–1277 Famine[19] Italy
    1275–1299 Collapse of the Anasazi civilization, widespread famine occurred[20] United States (present day)
    1285–1286 Famine[19] Italy
    1294 Famine Egypt
    1302–1303 Famine in Spain and Italy[19] Europe
    1304 Famine France
    1305 Famine France
    1310 Famine France

    1315–1317 Great Famine of 1315–1317 Europe[21]
    7,500,000
    1321 Famine England
    1328–1330 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland[19] Europe
    1330–1333 Famine France
    1333–1337 Chinese famine of 1333–1337 China[22] 6,000,000
    1339–1340 Famine in Italy, Spain and Ireland[19] Europe
    1344–1345 Famine in India, under the regime of Muhammad bin Tughluq[citation needed] India
    1346–1347 Famine in France, Italy and Spain[19] Europe
    1349–1351 Famine France
    1351 Famine England
    1358–1360 Famine France
    1369 Famine England
    1371 Famine France
    1374–1375 Famine in France, Italy and Spain[19] Europe
    1374–1375 Famine Egypt
    1387 After Timur the Lame left Asia Minor, severe famine ensued[citation needed] Anatolia
    1390–1391 Famine France
    1394–1396 Famine Egypt
    1396–1407 The Durga Devi famine India[23][10]
    1403–1404 Famine Egypt
    1432–1434 The Hungry Years Czech Republic (present-day)
    1437–1438 Famine in France, Holy Roman Empire, and Britain Europe
    1441 Famine in Mayapan Mexico[24]
    1450–1454 Famine in the Aztec Empire,[25] interpreted as the gods' need for sacrifices.[26] Mexico (present day)
    1460–1461 Kanshō famine in Japan[citation needed] Japan 82,000
    1472–1474 Famine[27] Italy
    1476 Famine[27] Italy
    1482–1484 Famine[27] Italy
    1493 Famine[27] Italy
    1502–1505 Famine[27] Italy
    1504 Spain[28]
    1518 Venice[citation needed] Italy (present day)
    1521–1523 Famine in the Low Countries, Ireland and the Nordic Countries Europe
    1527–1530 Famine[27] Italy
    1528 Famine in Languedoc France[29]
    1533–1534 Famine[27] Italy
    1535 Famine in Ethiopia Ethiopia
    1539–1540 Famine[27] Italy
    1540 Tenbun famine [ja] Japan
    1544–1545 Famine[27] Italy
    1550–1552 Famine[27] Italy
    1558–1560 Famine[27] Italy
    1567–1570 Famine in Harar, combined with plague[citation needed]. Emir of Harar died. Ethiopia
    1569–1574 Pan-European famine, including Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Low Countries, Nordic Countries, Russia and mostly east off Ukraine[27] Europe
    1585–1587 Pan-European famine, including Italy, France, Low Countries, Britain and Ireland[27] Europe
    1590–1598 Pan-European famine, including Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Britain and the Nordic countries[27] Europe
    1600–1601 Famine in Emilia and southern Lombardy[30] Italy
    1601–1603 One of the worst famines in all of Russian history, with as many as 100,000 in Moscow and up to one-third of Tsar Godunov's subjects killed; see Russian famine of 1601–03.[31][32] The same famine killed about half of the Estonian population. Russia 2,000,000
    1607–1608 Famine[27] Italy
    1618–1648 Famines in Europe caused by Thirty Years' War Europe
    1618–1622 Famine[27] Italy
    1619 Famine in Japan. During the Tokugawa period, there were 154 famines, of which 21 were widespread and serious.[33] Japan
    1628–1632 Famine[27] Italy
    1630–1632 Deccan famine of 1630–1632 India 7,400,000
    1630–1631 Famine in north-west China China
    1640–1643 Kan'ei Great Famine Japan 50,000-100,000
    1648–1649 Famine[27] Italy
    1648–1660 Poland lost an estimated 1/3 of its population due to wars, famine, and plague[citation needed] Poland
    1649 Famine in northern England [34] England
    1650–1652 Famine in the east of France [35] France
    1651–1653 Famine throughout much of Ireland during the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland[36] Ireland
    1661 Famine in India, due to lack of any rainfall for two years[37][10] India
    1670s – 1680s Plague and famines in Spain[citation needed] Spain
    1670–1671 Kyungshin Famine Korea 1,000,000 - 1,500,000
    1672 Famine in southern Italy[30] Italy
    1678–1679 Famine[27] Italy
    1680 Famine in Sardinia[38] Italy (present day) 80,000[39]
    1680s Famine in Sahel[35] West Africa
    1690s Famine throughout Scotland which killed 5–15% of the population [40] Scotland 60,000–180,000
    1693–1694 Between 1.3 and 1.5 million French died in the fr:grande famine de 1693-1694 France 1,300,000[41][42]
    1693–1695 Famine[27] Italy
    1695–1697 Great Famine of Estonia killed about a fifth of Estonian and Livonian population (70,000–75,000 people). Famine also hit Sweden (80,000–100,000 dead) The Swedish Empire, of which Swedish Estonia and Swedish Livonia were dominions at that time 150,000–175,000[citation needed]
    1696–1697 Great Famine of Finland wiped out almost a third of the population[43] Finland, then part of Sweden proper 150,000
    1702–1704 Famine in Deccan[44] India 2,000,000[44]
    1708–1711 Famine in East Prussia killed 250,000 people or 41% of its population.[45] According to other sources the great mortality was due to plague (disease), which between 1709 and 1711 killed about 200,000 – 250,000 out of 600,000 inhabitants of East Prussia.[46] The Great Northern War plague outbreak of 1708-1712 also affected East Prussia. East Prussia 250,000
    1709 Famine[27] Italy
    1709–1710 The fr:Grande famine de 1709 France[47] 600,000
    1716 Famine[27] Italy
    1722 Arabia[48]
    1724 Famine[27] Italy
    1727–1728 Famine in the English Midlands[49] England
    1732–1733 Kyōhō famine Japan 12,172–169,000[50]
    1738–1756 Famine in West Africa, half the population of Timbuktu died of starvation[51] West Africa
    1740–1741 Irish Famine (1740–1741) Ireland 300,000–480,000
    1750–1756 Famine in the Senegambia region [52] Senegal, Gambia (present day)
    1764 Famine in Naples[53][27] Italy (present day)
    1767 Famine[27] Italy
    1769–1773 Great Bengal famine of 1770,[10] 10 million dead (one third of population) India, Bangladesh (present day) 10,000,000
    1770–1771 Famines in Czech lands killed hundreds of thousands people Czech Republic (present day) 100,000+
    1771–1772 Famine in Saxony and southern Germany[citation needed] Germany
    1773 Famine in Sweden[54] Sweden
    1779 Famine in Rabat Morocco[55]
    1780s Great Tenmei famine Japan 20,000 – 920,000
    1783 Famine in Iceland caused by Laki eruption killed one-fifth of Iceland's population[56] Iceland
    1783–1784 Chalisa famine India 11,000,000[57]
    1784 Widespread famine throughout Egypt[58] Egypt
    1784–1785 Famine in Tunisia[citation needed] Tunisia
    1788 The two years previous to the French Revolution saw bad harvests and harsh winters, possibly because of a strong El Niño cycle[59] or caused by the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland.[60][61] France
    1789 Famine in Ethiopia afflicted "amhara/tigray north" Ethiopia
    1789–1793 Doji bara famine or Skull famine India 11,000,000
    1801 Famine[27] Italy
    1804–1872, 1913 A series of 14 famines in Austrian Galicia Poland, Ukraine (present day) 400,000-550,000
    1810, 1811, 1846, and 1849 Four famines in China China 45,000,000[62]
    1811–1812 Famine devastated Madrid[63] Spain 20,000[64]
    1815 Eruption of Tambora, Indonesia. Tens of thousands died in subsequent famine Indonesia 10,000
    1816–1817 Year Without a Summer Europe 65,000
    1830–1833 Claimed to have killed 42% of the population Cape Verde 30,000[65]
    1832–1833 Guntur famine of 1832 India 150,000
    1833–1837 Tenpō famine Japan
    1837–1838 Agra famine of 1837–1838 India 800,000
    1845–1857 Highland Potato Famine Scotland
    1845–1849 Great Famine in Ireland killed more than 1 million people. Between 1.5–2 million people forced to emigrate[66] Ireland 1,000,000+
    1846 Famine led to the peasant revolt known as "Maria da Fonte" in the north of Portugal[citation needed] Portugal
    1846-1848 The Newfoundland Potato Famine, related to the Irish Potato Famine. Newfoundland,present-day Canada
    1849–1850 Demak and Grobogan in Central Java, caused by four successive crop failures due to drought. Indonesia 83,000[67]
    1850–1873 As a result of the Taiping Rebellion, drought, and famine, the population of China dropped by more than 60 million[68] China 60,000,000
    1860–1861 Upper Doab famine of 1860–1861 India 2,000,000
    1863–1867 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 30,000[69]
    1866 Orissa famine of 1866 India 1,000,000[70]
    1866–1868 Finnish famine of 1866–1868. About 15% of the entire population died Finland 150,000+
    1866–1868 Famine in French Algeria French Algeria 820,000
    1867–1869 Swedish famine of 1867–1869. Sweden
    1869 Rajputana famine of 1869 India 1,500,000[70]
    1870–1872 Persian famine of 1870–1872 Iran 200,000-3,000,000 Estimates vary [71]
    1873–1874 Famine in Anatolia caused by drought and floods[72][73] Turkey (present day)
    1873–1874 Bihar famine of 1873–1874 India
    1876–1879 Famine in India, China, Brazil, Northern Africa (and other countries). Famine in northern China killed 9–13 million people.[74] 5.5 million died in the Great Famine of 1876–78 in India. 500,000 died in Brazil. British policies and drought were responsible for the deaths in India.[75][76] The famine in China was a result of drought influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation.[77] In Brazil, Grande Seca killed probably more than 400.000 people. India, China, Brazil, Northern Africa (and other countries). 15,000,000–19,000,000 in Northern China, India and Brazil.
    1878–1880 St. Lawrence Island famine, Alaska[78] United States 1,000
    1879 1879 Famine in Ireland. Unlike previous famines, this famine mainly caused hunger and food shortages but little mortality. Ireland
    1888–1889 Famine in Orrisa, Ganjam and Northern Bihar India 150,000
    1888–1892 Ethiopian Great famine. About one-third of the population died.[79][80] Conditions worsen with cholera outbreaks (1889–92), a typhus epidemic, and a major smallpox epidemic (1889–90). Ethiopia 1,000,000
    1891–1892 Russian famine of 1891–1892. Beginning along the Volga River and spreading to the Urals and the Black Sea. Russia 375,000–500,000[81][82]
    1895–1898 Famine during the Cuban War of Independence Cuba 200,000–300,000
    1896–1897 Famine in northern China leading in part to the Boxer Rebellion China
    1896–1902 Indian famine of 1896–1897 and Indian famine of 1899–1900 due to drought and British policies.[76][83][84] India 2,000,000 (British territories), mortality unknown in princely states
    1900–1903 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 11,000–20,000[69]
    1904–1906 Famine in Spain.[85][86][87] Spain
    1907, 1911 Famines in east-central China China 25,000,000 [88]
    1914–1918 Mount Lebanon famine during World War I which was caused by an Entente powers and Ottoman Turk blockade of food and to a swarm of locusts which killed up to 200,000 people, estimated to be half of the Mount Lebanon population[89] Lebanon 200,000
    1914–1919 Famine caused by the Allied blockade of Germany during World War I until Germany signed the Treaty of Versailles.[90] Germany 763,000
    1917 Famine in German East Africa German East Africa 300,000
    1917–1919 Persian famine of 1917–1919 Iran 2,000,000,[91] but estimates range as high as 10,000,000[92]
    1918–1919 Rumanura famine in Ruanda-Burundi, causing large migrations to the Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day)[citation needed]
    1919–1922 Kazakh famine of 1919–1922. A series of famines in Turkestan at the time of the Bolshevik revolution killed about a sixth of the population Turkestan [93]
    1920–1921 Famine in northern China China 500,000
    1920–1922 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 24,000–25,000[69]
    1921 Russian famine of 1921–1922 Russia 5,000,000[94]
    1921–1922 1921–1922 famine in Tatarstan Russia 500,000–2,000,000[95]
    1924–1925 Famine in Volga German colonies in Russia. One-third of the entire population perished[96][unreliable source?][unreliable source?] Russia
    1924–1925 Minor famine in Ireland due to heavy rain Irish Free State[citation needed]
    1928–1929 Famine in Ruanda-Burundi, causing large migrations to the Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day)
    1928–1930 Chinese famine of 1928–1930 in northern China. The drought resulted in million of deaths China 3,000,000-10,000,000
    1930–1931 Famine Madagascar 32,000
    1932–1933 Soviet famine of 1932–1933, including famine in Ukraine, caused by deliberate Soviet collectivization of scarce food resources.[97] Russian SFSR and Ukrainian SSR 7,000,000[98]

    1936 Famine in China China 5,000,000[99]
    1940–1943 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 20,000[69]
    1940–1945 Famine in Warsaw Ghetto, as well as other ghettos and concentration camps (note: this famine was the result of deliberate denial of food to ghetto residents on the part of Nazis).[100] Occupied Poland
    1940–1948 Famine in Morocco between 1940 and 1948, because of refueling system installed by France.[101] Morocco 200,000
    1941–1944 Leningrad famine caused by a 900-day blockade by German troops. About one million Leningrad residents starved, froze, or were bombed to death in the winter of 1941–42, when supply routes to the city were cut off and temperatures dropped to −40 °C (−40 °F).[102] According to other estimates about 800,000 out of an immediate pre-siege population of about 2.5 million perished.[103] Soviet Union 800,000–1,000,000
    1941–1944 Famine in Greece caused by the Axis occupation.[104][105] Greece 300,000
    1941–1942 Famine in Kharkiv (Kharkov). In a city with a population of about 450,000 while under German occupation, there was a famine starting in the winter of 1941–42 that lasted until the end of September 1942. The local administration recorded 19,284 deaths between the second half of December 1941 and the second half of September 1942, thereof 11,918 (59.6%) from hunger.[106] The Foreign Office representative at Army High Command 6 noted on 25.03.1942 that according to reports reaching municipal authorities at least 50 people were dying of hunger every day, and that the true number might be much higher as in many cases the cause of death was stated as "unknown" and besides many deaths were not reported.[107] According to Soviet sources about 70–80,000 people died of starvation in Kharkov during the occupation by Nazi Germany.[108] Soviet Union 11,918–80,000
    1941-1943 Famine in Kyiv (Kiev). On April 1, 1942, well after the first winter of famine, Kiev officially had about 352,000 inhabitants. In the middle of 1943—more than four months before the end of German rule—the city officially had about 295,600.Death by starvation was not the only reason for the rapid decline in population: deportation to Germany and Nazi shootings also played their part. Nevertheless, starvation was an important factor.[109] Soviet Union
    1942–1943 Chinese famine of 1942–1943 Henan, China 2,000,000–3,000,000
    1942–1943 Iranian famine of 1942–1943 Iran 3,000,000[110][better source needed]
    1943 Bengal famine of 1943 Bengal, India, Bangladesh 2,100,000
    1943–1944 Ruzagayura famine in Ruanda-Urundi, causing emigrations to Congo Rwanda and Burundi (present day) 36,000–50,000
    1943–1945 Famine in Hadhramaut Yemen (present day) 10,000[111][112]
    1944–1945 Java under Japanese occupation Java, Indonesia 2,400,000[113]
    1944 Dutch famine of 1944 during World War II Netherlands 20,000
    1945 Vietnamese Famine of 1945 Vietnam 600,000–2,000,000[114]
    1945-1947 Famine in Königsberg (Kaliningrad) Soviet Union 57,000−76,500[115]
    1946-1947 German "Hungerwinter" Germany > 100,000[116]
    1946–1947 Soviet famine of 1946–1947 Soviet Union 1,000,000–1,500,000[117][118]
    1946–1948 Famine in Cape Verde Cape Verde 30,000[69]
    1949 Nyasaland Famine 1949 Malawi 200
    1950 1950 Canadian caribou famine Canada 60

    &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
    1958 Famine in Tigray Ethiopia 100,000
    1959–1961 The Great Chinese Famine[119][120][121] Some researchers also include the year 1958 or 1962. China (mainland) 15,000,000–55,000,000[120][122][123]
    1966–1967 Lombok, drought and malnutrition, exacerbated by restrictions on regional rice trade Indonesia 50,000[124]
    1967–1970 Biafran famine caused by Nigerian blockade Nigeria 2,000,000
    1968–1972 Sahel drought created a famine that killed a million people[125] Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger and Burkina Faso 1,000,000[citation needed]
    1971–1973 Afghanistan drought Afghanistan Thousand
    1972–1973 Famine in Ethiopia caused by drought and poor governance; failure of the government to handle this crisis led to the fall of Haile Selassie and to Derg rule Ethiopia 60,000[126]
    1973 Darfur drought Darfur, Sudan Thousand
    1974 Bangladesh famine of 1974 Bangladesh 27,000-1,500,000[citation needed]
    1975–1979 Khmer Rouge. A maximum estimate of 500,000 Cambodians lost their lives to famine Cambodia 500,000[127]
    1980–1981 Caused by drought and conflict[126] Uganda 30,000[126]
    1982–1985 Famine caused by the Mozambican Civil War Mozambique 100,000
    1983–1985 1983–1985 famine in Ethiopia Ethiopia 400,000–600,000[128]
    1984–1985 Famine caused by drought, economic crisis and the Second Sudanese Civil War Sudan 240,000
    1988 Famine caused by the Second Sudanese Civil War Sudan 100,000
    1991–1992 Famine in Somalia caused by drought and civil war[126] Somalia 300,000[126]
    1993 1993 Sudan famine Sudan
    1994–1998 North Korean famine.[129][130] Scholars estimate 600,000 died of starvation (other estimates range from 200,000 to 3.5 million).[131] North Korea 200,000–3,500,000
    1998 1998 Sudan famine caused by war and drought Sudan 70,000[126]
    1998 1998 Afghanistan famine Afghanistan Thousand
    1998–2000 Famine in Ethiopia. The situation worsened by Eritrean–Ethiopian War Ethiopia
    1998–2004 Second Congo War. 2.7 million people died, mostly from starvation and disease Democratic Republic of the Congo 2,700,000
    2003–2005 Famine during the War in Darfur Sudan 200,000
    2005–2006 2005–2006 Niger food crisis. At least three million were affected in Niger and 10 million throughout West Africa[citation needed] Niger and West Africa
    2011–2012 Famine in Somalia, brought on by the 2011 East Africa drought[132] Somalia 285,000
    2012 Famine in West Africa, brought on by the 2012 Sahel drought[133] Senegal, Gambia, Niger, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso
    2016–present Famine in Yemen, arising from the Yemeni Civil War and the subsequent blockade of Yemen by Saudi Arabia Yemen 85,000 children[134] Unknown number of adults.
    2017–present Famine in South Sudan[135] Famine in Somalia, due to 2017 Somalian drought. Famine in Nigeria South Sudan, Unity State, Somalia, and Nigeria.
    2020–present Famine in the Tigray War Tigray, Ethiopia

Horus
Senior Member+
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Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 18:49

ወልቂጤ ዩኒቨርሲቲ የእንሰት ምርምር ማዕከል

Horus
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Posts: 23275
Joined: 19 Oct 2013, 19:34

Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 19:22

በነገራችን ላይ የኢትዮጵያ ሳይንስ አካዳሚን የመሰረተው ይህ የጉራጌ የእርሻ ሳይቲስት ነው። ስሙ ስሜ ደበላ ይባል ነበር። አርፏል በቅርብ!


Horus
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Posts: 23275
Joined: 19 Oct 2013, 19:34

Re: ቆጮ 100 ሚሊዮን ህዝብ የሚመግብ አንደኛ የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ ሊሆን ነው

Post by Horus » 23 Jan 2022, 20:06

Noble Amara
በመሰረቱ የእንሰት መፋቂያው ማሺን እና ቆጮ ፕሮሴሲንግ ቴክኖሎጂ (ማቡኪያውና ዱቄት ማድረጊያው ሳይንስ ገና ብዙ ይቀረዋል። በፋብሪካ ደረጃ ብዙ ካፒታልና ኢንጅነሪንግ ይፈልጋል ። እስካሁን ያለው ትልቅ ነገር ዘመናዊ የቆጮ ዳቦ፣ ቡላ፣ ገንፎ በመላ ኢትዮጵያ እጅግ ተወዳጅ ሆኖዋል። አሁን ማኗሊ የሚሰራው ብዙ ድካል ስላለው ዋጋው እየተወደደ ነው እንጂ ። ሌላው በቪዲዮው እንዳየሀው የአንኮበር አርሶ አደሮች እንሰት ተክል ሙከራ እያደረጉ ነው ። በኦሮሞ ብዙ ብዙ ቦታ በቅርብ ዋና ተክል ይሆናል ። እንደ አርሲ፣ ኤሎባቦርና ወለጋ ያሉ ለም አገሮች በቀላሉ ነው የሚበቅሉት ። እኔ ያለኝ እምነት በትግራይም ዉሃ ከመሬት ሰቦና በመስኖ ቴክኖሎጂ እንሰትን ቢተክሉ ትልቅ መፍትሄ ነው የሚሆናቸው ። የእንሰት ዋና ዋጋ ድርቀት መከላከል ስለሆነ ። ትላልቅ ባለ ሃብቶች እንዲገቡበት ማድረግ ነው።


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