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Zmeselo
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Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 06:32



Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

By: Ruth Abraham

https://shabait.com/2020/09/16/prospect ... n-eritrea/

GENERAL

On Sep 16, 2020



Since its independence, one of the major challenges Eritrea has been facing is the provision of sustainable energy in the country and making it equally accessible to the whole population. Currently, Eritrea’s energy mostly depends on diesel, which is both expensive and destructive to the ecosystem. The ever increasing demand of electricity and the cost of energy production is a heavy burden for the country to continue to carry unless economically and environmentally safe alternative sources of energy, such as thermal, solar and wind are sought.

The Ministry of Energy and Mines has been working to find a solution. For example, a study on Eritrea’s potential for renewable energy production was conducted by the ministry, in collaboration with the Swedish Consultants International (SWECO), in 1998. The project started by setting up Wind and Solar Monitoring Network (WSMN) in 25 locations across the country. It was a valuable step in expanding the technical and man power capabilities to promote renewable energy development in Eritrea.



According to the WSMN report, the project included two components with the following main objectives.

1. The creation of guidelines and routines for Wind and Solar Energy Information System (WSIS), increase technical and human resources to develop and sustain the WSIS, which is maintained and operated by the Energy Research and Training Center (ERTC) of the Department of Energy of the Ministry of Energy and Mines.

2. The formulation and implementation of a Wind Turbine Pilot Project (WTPP), which, in addition to increasing the energy production, should provide transfer of knowledge in wind energy technology and in the operation and maintenance of wind turbines.

The objectives have been successfully carried out by installing 25 WSMN and providing the required training to staff to ensure the proper maintenance of the WSIS.

The wind sites in Eritrea, which are distributed all over the country, can roughly be divided into three regions: the Coastal Region, Western Lowlands, and Central Highlands. The most potent site for wind power is the Coastal Region of Eritrea, Southern Red Sea Coast in particular. An overview of Eritrea’s energy sector shows that many villages in the Central highlands and Southern Coastal region are suitable for the installation of wind energy turbines.

Though the best sites for wind power installation were found in coastal regions, especially for the southern part of the country, good sites can also be found in parts of the central highland region, especially on mountain ridges. But more in-depth analysis should be performed before planning for the erection of wind turbines at any of the studied sites.

For the good sites, the seasonal variations are most prominent in the coastal region with a peak during the period November- March. Comparing results from measurements with values from Global Wind Atlas (GWA), both the mean wind speed and wind power density are typically higher for the measurements. The difference is especially large for the more complex terrain of the central highland sites where GWA results as well as the extrapolation of the wind speeds becomes more uncertain.

Generally, based on its speed, intensity, magnitude and other technical factors, wind is classified into seven classes. Whereas the first three are known as Low speed winds, Classes 4-7 are very speedy and have the potential to serve as an alternative source of energy. And many potential wind sites in Eritrea belong to classes 4-7, making them suitable for the generation of wind energy.



Mr. Tesfay Ghebrehiwet, the Director of Renewable Energy at the Ministry of Energy and Mines, said that given that Eritrea has high potential of harnessing wind, the prospects of an extensive use of wind energy in the country looks promising.

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DID YOU KNOW that Adhanet, a fuel-efficient and environmentally-friendly traditional oven in Eritrea won many international awards?

* 1st Ashden Awards (UK 2003)
* One Million Yen prize money (Japan Expo, 2005)
* 1st Tech Museum Awards (2006 USA)
* 1st Green Apple Awards (2010)

More than 10,000 smokeless Adhanet ovens are being manufactured every year and distributed by the government to families around the country, FREE of charge.
(TN: @tesfanews)
Last edited by Zmeselo on 16 Sep 2020, 13:17, edited 2 times in total.

Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 07:14



Changing climate and populations have increased demands on Africa's soils. Over 40% face nutrient depletion, partly because of insufficient fertilizer. The Colluli Project could prove to be beneficial for improved productivity of agriculture in Africa.
https://www.danakali.com.au/products

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Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 07:27



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(International Institute of Buffalo) Tesfay Kidane Day in the City of Buffalo (New York)



Congratulations!




Mayor Byron W. Brown https://www.facebook.com/MayorByronBrow ... tn__=kCH-R is in Buffalo (New York).

I proudly proclaimed it Tesfay Kidane Day in the City of Buffalo, in honor of him bringing the first Eritrean Orthodox Church to our City. Masten District Councilmember Wingo also sponsored a trailblazer sign recognizing Kidane’s pioneering effort to found St. Michael’s Orthodox Church, located at 1551 Jefferson Avenue.

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New talent (Rezene Alem), taking on a Tekle Tesfazghi classic.
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Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 08:04

The “Needy and Less Capable” African

By: Dr. Fikrejesus Amahazion

https://shabait.com/2020/09/16/the-need ... e-african/

GENERAL

On Sep 16, 2020



Recently, Eritrea Profile began publishing a new series of articles under the banner, “#UnderstandingEritrea”. Broadly, the series aims to clarify and help shed further light on some of the most critical elements of Eritrea’s national development plans, such as the improvement, preservation, and sustainable use of its land and water resources. Thus far, the articles featured within the series have been enlightening and several readers have commented that they have learned a great deal about some amazing and exciting development projects. In the last issue of Eritrea Profile (published on Saturday 12 September), the article that was featured as part of the #UnderstandingEritrea series described the process of how some of the large dams in the country were actually developed, charting their path from initial ideas and early blueprints to the construction phase and then full service. While the article was informative and full of detail, mirroring those published previously, one point mentioned by the author especially piqued my interest and is worth further discussion. Specifically, the author explained how some of the dams (and other development projects in the country) have been the target of misinformation, condescending narratives, baseless criticisms, and unsubstantiated claims from abroad. What gives?

There is little doubt, that a lot of this can simply be attributed to sheer ignorance and a general lack of understanding. Hence, the great value and necessity of the #UnderstandingEritrea series, which mainly seeks to provide clarity and promote greater understanding. However, there are also several other troubling factors underlying much of the misinformation, baseless criticisms, and unsubstantiated claims: racism and deep arrogance.



Unfortunately, although it is the year 2020, and one would expect much, much better, in many parts of the world, but particularly in the West, there are some that are simply unable to accept the basic fact that Africans, and those from the developing world more broadly, have agency and they can – actually often do – find creative answers, develop effective solutions, and produce things of considerable merit. There is a narrow-minded, and flatly wrong, conventional wisdom that no problems can be solved, that no challenges or obstacles can be surmounted, that no true progress can be made, unless it is the West that is doing the planning, leading, directing, and implementing.

This mentality is, of course, not new. It can be traced back centuries, representing a part of Western schools of thought and serving to undergird and legitimize colonialism, imperialism, and slavery. Writing in the second half of the 18th century, the German philosopher Immanuel Kant contended:
The Negroes of Africa have received from nature, no intelligence that rises above the foolish. The difference between the two races is thus a substantial one: it appears to be just as great in respect to the faculties of the mind as in color.
Similarly, in the same century, the French philosopher Voltaire claimed:
If their [Africans] understanding is not of a different nature from ours, it is at least greatly inferior. They are not capable of any great application or association of ideas, and seem formed neither in the advantages nor the abuses of our philosophy.
Meanwhile, David Hume, the Scottish philosopher and historian, also regarded Africans as an inferior race:
I am apt to suspect the Negroes to be naturally inferior to the Whites. There scarcely ever was a civilised nation of that complexion, nor even any individual, eminent either in action or speculation. No ingenious manufactures amongst them, no arts, no sciences.
Over subsequent centuries, this racist, arrogant,
nothing good can come out of Africa
mindset proved to be highly resilient.

Today, it can still be found, if not clear, outright, and overt then flowing just under the surface, within a broad array of disciplines and areas, including academia, economics and international development, world politics, international relations, media, and journalism, among others. It is obvious, for instance, in Western academic assumptions that what is said in Euro-American universities is only what has been said or only what matters (Davies 1994). It is also on display when an all non-African panel of “experts” or a non-African journalist, often having never set foot on the continent or when having done so not venturing too far from the comfortable confines of the local air-conditioned, five star hotel, will “Africasplain” something about Africa to Africans in a condescending, patronizing manner.



A young, low-income, African developing country, Eritrea faces numerous challenges within many different areas. However, it also remains proud and unbowed, and it has long striven to strike an independent, self-reliant path. It seeks genuine partnerships with all and is fiercely protective of its independence and sovereignty. The country also retains close control of its development agenda. It is thus relatively easy to understand how for those steeped in arrogance and racism, who remain possessed by a messianic conception of themselves as the saviors of the world and the inferiority of Africans, Eritrea is a target for criticism.

The country’s initial independence and continued sovereign existence vexes those who worked tirelessly against that outcome and grates those experts who confidently told all that it would be a weak, needy, unviable entity. The country’s desire to be self-reliant pushes back against the misguided notion that Africans are passive and absolutely dependent on outside help. Its noble desire to be independent also puts it at fundamental odds with those who have long been used to the paternalistic approach of monopolizing control over resources, imposing conditionalities, driving programs, and possessing inordinate influence over strategy in developing countries. Anything positive that Eritrea manages to achieve or produce – such as constructing effective development projects that are positively transforming communities – poses a challenge for those who believe that Africans are somehow inherently and naturally less capable.

That is why biased reports and stories over-report, sensationalize, or exaggerate “negative” aspects about Eritrea and underreport challenges, ignore context, and downplay, dismiss, or overlook “positive” developments in the country. And that’s why transformational dams, planned by creative, local experts, constructed through the sweat and tireless efforts of so many Eritreans, and happily rejoiced by many locals for having brought about an array of tremendously positive changes to their standard of living, can be arrogantly criticized and dismissed by those without clue thousands of miles away.

Instead of continuing with assertions that are not grounded in any observable reality, or the promotion of condescending, paternalistic narratives rooted in arrogance and racism, the significant advancements and important progress Eritrea has made in many sectors should be recognized.


_____________


Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 08:44

(EMN): እዋይ ናይ ኣደ ነገር ዝገርም እዩ። ልዋም ወዳ ክተርክብ 115 ኪሎሜትር ብብሽክለታ: ንባጽዕ።



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Now that the Beles season is (almost) over, guess what the ever-creative folks at Hagaz created to hold us off until next year? Yup. Beles ማርመላታ. So for lunch today, I had the perfect ስካቡሊ meal: cheese ናይ ኣዘብ with jam ናይ ሓጋዝ and ስገም bread ናይ ደንደን
(Milena Bereket: @tekerebanelim)

____________

Ruth Abraha:


ኣታ'ዛ ሃገረይ ክሳብ ከምዚ’ላ ትቕንጁ
ኢደይ እንተዘይሕውስ ኔረ
ምተረፍኩዶ ሃሪረ
ቱፍቱፍ ኣይግበረለይ
ክምኡ እንተዝኸውን
ታሪኽ: ታሪኽ ከ እንታይ ክብለኒ
ከም ነውራም ጌሩ ዶ ክኽዕበኒ
ሩት ኣብርሃ
Last edited by Zmeselo on 16 Sep 2020, 09:45, edited 1 time in total.

Zmeselo
Senior Member+
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 09:26

Combatting Brucellosis in Eritrea

By: Milka Teklom

https://shabait.com/2020/09/16/combatti ... n-eritrea/

NATION BUILDING

On Sep 16, 2020



Brucellosis, which is also known as Undulant fever, Malta fever, and Mediterranean fever, is a highly contagious disease mainly caused by consuming unpasteurized milk, raw and undercooked meat from infected animals, or close contact with their secretions. Although human to human transmission is rare, it can be spread through breastfeeding and sexual contact.

It is widely believed that brucellosis is more common in countries that do not have good and effective public health and domestic animal health programs, but developed countries still have some cases. Knowledge about the prevalence of brucellosis in a country is crucial to setting up a strategy to control and eradicate the disease. For this reason, the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) in Eritrea has been carrying out serological surveys for many years to be able to estimate the seroprevalence of brucellosis in dairy cattle and to draft strategies for control and eradication of the disease in the country.

In Eritrea, with its estimated indigenous resource of about 1.65 million tropical livestock units, agriculture and livestock are regarded as one of the most important sectors for developing the country’s economy. Surveys by the MoA show farmers employ three cattle husbandry methods: intensive urban and semi-urban method, extensive mixed crop-livestock method used in the southern highlands, and the traditional pastoral method used in the western and eastern lowlands. The traditional pastoral method is believed to be the reason for an increase in the number of brucellosis-infected humans, as traditional herds-men tend to constantly consume unpasteurized milk.

The percentage of dairy cattle infection with brucella is generally low in Eritrea. In 7,979 tests for bovine brucellosis that were carried out throughout the five regions, 2.9% (230) of the cattle were positive.

Follow-up testing is underway with a focus on the Central and Southern regions, the two regions where the majority of dairy cattle are located and dairy production is common.

In Anseba region, livestock owners volunteered to cull reactor animals. The MoA has been implementing programs such as the elimination of brucella reactors, payment of an indemnity or compensation for slaughter of reactors, testing and quarantine of imported herds, veterinary service provision in all sub-zones, prohibiting the sale of milk from TB and brucella infected cows, sensitisation of dairy farmers and consumers through the provision of information.



Dr. Yonas Weldu, Director of Animal and Plant Health, said the main way of preventing brucellosis is by using fastidious hygiene in producing raw milk products, or by pasteurizing all milk (in its unaltered form or as a derivative, such as cheese) that is meant for human consumption. He added that individual animal testing should be practiced both for trade and for disease-control.
Above all raising awareness is the key. Simple facts like ‘Brucella species are readily killed by most commonly available disinfectants, including acid solutions, 70% ethanol containing products, and sodium’ should be constantly advertised,
Dr. Yonas emphasized.

Although the World Organization for Animal Health Manual of Diagnostic Test and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals has been suggesting for all cattle of age 3–8 months to receive the Brucella aborts strain 19 vaccines, encouraged by the decreasing cases every year Eritrea was not practicing it. But with the resurgence of some cases in the town of Gindae, the MoA is taking all measures to apply the procedure.

Dr. Yonas calls on farmers to be careful when they bring in new livestock to their farms; he advises them to isolate the new arrivals and get them tested before mixing them with the herd. He also cautioned farmers that the infection is reported to be widespread in neighboring countries, including Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. As movement of animals between Eritrea and the Sudan and between Eritrea and Ethiopia is widespread, it is more than likely for the infection to spread in Eritrea.

In an effort to raise awareness about the spread of brucellosis and other communicable diseases, the MoA has on June 2 given a training workshop on disease outbreak investigation, proper field sample collection, transportation, preservation and laboratory disease diagnosis techniques, transportation and packing of biological material as per the regulation of the International Air Transportation Association (IATA).

____________

Last edited by Zmeselo on 16 Sep 2020, 13:33, edited 1 time in total.

Zmeselo
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Posts: 21593
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 09:39


On Sept 15 1948, the question of the disposition of former Italian colonies; Eritrea, Somalia & Libya was referred to the UNGA upon the expiry of the 1 year period set in the Treaty of Peace with Italy, France, the fmr USSR, the UK & the USA.

On Sept. 15 1952, the British relinquished power in Eritrea & the UN mandated Federation against the will of the Eritrean ppl with Ethiopia took effect. Ethiopian military occupied Asmara, Massawa, Asseb & Mai-Habar.
A DARK DAY TO ERITREAN PEOPLE

Soon after the Federation took effect; the railway & port administration, the roads system, the cable, postal & telephone services, the salt trade were given to be governed under the Ethiopian govt. This deprived of the main sources of income to the govt of Eritrea.
• The important posts in government institutions were given to Ethiopian citizens.
• Government owned residential houses and offices were also given to Ethiopian officials of higher rank.
• Ethiopian soldiers were allowed to remain in Eritrea for 'security purposes'.

On Sept 15, 1965, the Battle of Mihlab (Senhit), was fought b/n ELF fighters & Ethiopian imperial forces. 21 ELF freedom fighters were martyred, while 4 were wounded. The bodies of the fallen Eritrean heroes were later hung in Keren market square for public display, by the Ethio gov.
(History of Eritrea ታሪኽ ኤርትራ.تاريخ إريتريا: @Erihistory)

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ሃገረይ መሬተይ! ኣብ ሓጺር ግዜ የራኽበና፡ ኮሮና የጥፋልና፥
ናይ 2020 ትምኒተይ፡፡
(Ghideon Musa: @GhideonMusa)

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(Eri-TV): ዝኽሪ ጅግንነት ግንባር ቡረ ግንቦት ሰነ 2000 ምስ ዋርሳይ ሚካኤል ሓጎስ



Heroism of those who kept Eritrea intact & preserved the peaceful land. Eternal Remembrance, to those who gave their lives so that we can live.

Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 13:15



Biniam Grmaye ኣይተካእለን! ኣብዚ ሎሚ ዝተካየደ ናይ ሓደ መዓልቲ ቱር ዲ ቶስካና: 4ይ ብምውጻእ ደሚቁ ወጺኡ:: Good job Bini! ሞራል: ሞራል: ንቢኒ! ❤ @NIPPO_Delko_OP_



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Last edited by Zmeselo on 16 Sep 2020, 14:36, edited 1 time in total.

Zmeselo
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 14:08





ዓካት! I spent 20 minutes, making a spinning Top ዓካት the Eritrean way. Had to show off to my son against his Beyblade, but I got whipped.
(Aman Ande: @Amanuelande)

Zmeselo
Senior Member+
Posts: 21593
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 15:42



FICTION
In This Novel of Exile, Sulaiman Addonia Writes From Experience


Like his young heroes, Sulaiman Addonia fled Eritrea for a Sudanese refugee camp as a child. Credit: Lyse Ishimwe

By Jamil Jan Kochai

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/15/book ... ongue.html

Sept. 15, 2020

SILENCE IS MY MOTHER TONGUE
By Sulaiman Addonia

Sulaiman Addonia’s second novel, “Silence Is My Mother Tongue,” (194 pp. Graywolf Press. Paper, $16.) begins with a trial in a makeshift cinema in a refugee camp in Sudan. The supposed crime: an act of incestuous domestic abuse perpetrated by the protagonist, Saba, against her mute brother, Hagos. It soon becomes clear that Saba’s accusers don’t actually know much about her. Is she Eritrean or Ethiopian? Muslim or Christian? Saba is presented to us as an enigma, far too fluid to be easily categorized. Throughout the trial, the book’s narrator, a fellow refugee named Jamal, relates back to us the remarkably tender stories of Saba’s so-called “crimes,” involving a blanket shared between the siblings and a botched circumcision. Jamal has a poet’s tongue and a painter’s eye, and he describes his experience of Saba and his other neighbors (some of whom have committed abominable crimes against him) with heartbreaking tenderness. It is a harried and lifelike and momentous opening to a novel.

But as the perspective shifts in the second chapter from Jamal’s to Saba’s, explaining the circumstances of how her family ended up in the camp, the story loses some of its earlier momentum and verve. The prose is just as elegant and descriptive — Addonia, who himself fled Eritrea for a Sudanese refugee camp as a child, lavishes us with such details as oil lamps floating toward dark rivers, and mosques built of sand. But what begins as a riveting, mysterious, almost magical and delightfully chaotic depiction of the inner workings of an East African refugee camp shifts into a slower, more careful tale of a young girl and her brother, creating new worlds out of dust. We follow Saba in her day-to-day life as she explores the camp, becomes acquainted with her neighbors, seeks food and resources, and attempts to restart her education. There is much wandering and observing in these early chapters, the pace conveying the arrested nature of life in a refugee camp — an in-between space of not-home and not-journey, a personal and political purgatory for Saba and those around her.


What begins as a delightfully chaotic depiction of the inner workings of an East African refugee camp shifts into a slower, more careful tale of a young girl and her brother, creating new worlds out of dust.

The novel’s plot is largely carried along by the fragile, symbiotic relationship between Saba and Hagos. The teenage siblings are intimately bound by their shared history of physical and emotional traumas, and constantly project their own desires and needs onto each other. In letting Hagos dress and groom her, Saba
allowed herself to be turned into the woman he carried within him.
In turn, Hagos takes on her domestic housework (to their mother’s dismay) so she can focus on her studies, and carries her deepest secrets, trusted as he is to never repeat them. None of the other relationships in the novel hold a candle to theirs.

Characters fall in and out of the narrative without much organic development. The dialogue between Saba and her friends and neighbors can sometimes seem heavy-handed, as if the characters are summarizing the themes of the novel to one another. Saba’s passive, judgmental mother is beholden to the camp’s midwife, herself a cruel traditionalist who is constantly condemning Saba for subverting their cultural norms. The flatness of these satellite characters would be easier to tolerate if they didn’t loom so large throughout the plot without much deepening our understanding of Saba or her worldview.

Fortunately the novel’s second half introduces Saba and Hagos to a number of much more rounded characters in the camp, notably an older businessman who becomes entangled in their lives. By the end, as this story of young, codependent refugees is propelled into a revelatory, formally experimental and ultimately tragic conclusion, the initial depth and beauty Jamal witnessed through his “cinema” curtains has only further blossomed. The novel leaves us with the lingering imprint of the siblings’ many sacrifices, and their ever-growing love.

Jamil Jan Kochai is the author of “99 Nights in Logar.”

Zmeselo
Senior Member+
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Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 16 Sep 2020, 16:08



On View
Painter Ficre Ghebreyesus Was Beloved in New Haven as a Chef. Now, He’s the Toast of the Art World—See His Works Here

Galerie Lelong is representing the late artist's estate.

Caroline Goldstein

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/fic ... ue-1907086

September 15, 2020


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Mangia Libro (ca. 2007). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie LeLong & Co.

As galleries and art institutions around the world begin to reopen, we are spotlighting individual shows—online and IRL—that are worth your attention.

“Ficre Ghebreyesus: Gate to the Blue”
through October 24, 2020 at Galerie Lelong

What the gallery says:
Borrowing the title from one of his works, “Gate to the Blue” suggests not only a color significant to Ghebreyesus, but also an opening to the boundless sea and sky, an entry point to the unknown, which was a constant in the artist’s life as a refugee who fled his native Eritrea to eventually settle in New Haven, Connecticut.

The artist was highly influenced by music and was a lover of the blues genre that originated in the journey of enslaved people over water and is rooted in African musical traditions and spirituality.
Why it’s worth a look: Within his New Haven community, Ficre Ghebreyesus was beloved as an adventurous chef and the co-owner of Caffé Adulis, and as a man with deep interests in poetry and music. A talented painter, he still had no aspirations to become the toast of Manhattan’s art world, and was content instead to work under the radar and share his work with those closest to him.

In 2012, Ghebryesus died unexpectedly at just 50 years old, leaving behind more than 800 canvases. Since then, his wife, the poet and president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Elizabeth Alexander, has sought to share her late husband’s work with a wider audience, helping to arrange posthumous exhibitions of his work, eventually securing his estate’s representation with Galerie Lelong.

A refugee from Eritrea, Ghebreyesus made works shine with color, pattern, and forms that he kept in his recollections of his birthplace, as well as from his travels in Sudan, Italy, and Germany. Water is a recurring motif, as is a staccato checkerboard pattern of pink and red. One of his largest work’s (which was part of an earlier virtual show this spring) measuring 16 feet by 8 feet, is The Sardine Fisherman’s Funeral, a busy affair featuring cherubs with fish-scale wings, a host of attendants huddled together alongside a man holding a shovel, and an oversized sardine that may well represent the coffin of the deceased subject in keeping with the tradition of final resting places that mirror one’s lifetime vocation—all on a flattened picture plane that recalls an early Renaissance painting.

What it looks like:


Ficre Ghebreyesus, The Sardine Fisherman’s Funeral, (2002). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Zememesh Berhe’s Magic Garden (ca. 2002). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Horizon with Interred Figures (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Tis Time to Seek Asylum (ca. 2007-11). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Gate to the Blue (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Boat at Night (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Mangia Libro (ca. 2007). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Seated Musician with Feathered Wing (2011). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Untitled (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Boat (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, La Amistad (2002). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Nkisi (ca. 2011). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Red Hats and Balloons (ca. 2002-07). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie Lelong & Co.


Ficre Ghebreyesus, Gate to the Compound (2006). Courtesy of the Estate of Ficre Ghebreyesus and Galerie LeLong & Co.

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The late, Ficre Ghebreyesus. RIP, brother!
Last edited by Zmeselo on 17 Sep 2020, 05:32, edited 2 times in total.

Meleket
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Posts: 681
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Meleket » 17 Sep 2020, 02:56

Zmeselo wrote:
16 Sep 2020, 06:32
...

Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

By: Ruth Abraham

https://shabait.com/2020/09/16/prospect ... n-eritrea/

GENERAL

On Sep 16, 2020

....

Since its independence, one of the major challenges Eritrea has been facing is the provision of sustainable energy in the country and making it equally accessible to the whole population. Currently, Eritrea’s energy mostly depends on diesel, which is both expensive and destructive to the ecosystem. The ever increasing demand of electricity and the cost of energy production is a heavy burden for the country to continue to carry unless economically and environmentally safe alternative sources of energy, such as thermal, solar and wind are sought.

The Ministry of Energy and Mines has been working to find a solution. For example, a study on Eritrea’s potential for renewable energy production was conducted by the ministry, in collaboration with the Swedish Consultants International (SWECO), in 1998. The project started by setting up Wind and Solar Monitoring Network (WSMN) in 25 locations across the country. It was a valuable step in expanding the technical and man power capabilities to promote renewable energy development in Eritrea.

....

Mr. Tesfay Ghebrehiwet, the Director of Renewable Energy at the Ministry of Energy and Mines, said that given that Eritrea has high potential of harnessing wind, the prospects of an extensive use of wind energy in the country looks promising.
...
ቀደም ኣብ ታሪኽ ደቅ እስራኤል ብዛዕባ ሩት ከምዡይ ተባሂሉ ነበረ “ክትቅርም ምስ ተንስኤት ድማ፡ ቦአዝ ነቶም ግዙአቱ፡ አብ ማእከል እንዳእቲ ትቐርም ኣይተሕፍርዋ። ካብ ዕትርቲ መዝሒቕኩም ከአ ክትአርዮ ሕደጉላ፡ አይትኾርዩላውን፡ ኢሉ አዘዞም።”

ንሕና ደቂ ኤርትራ ድማ ንሩት ጓልያ አብርሃም ከምዡይ ንብለን፤ ጽቡቕ ጽሒፍክን ኣሎኽን። እስከ በላ እቱይ ካብ ነፋስ ጸዓት ናይ ምምንጫው መጽናዕቲ ካብ 1998 እንተደአ ጀሚሩ ኮይኑ ክሳብ ለይቲ ሎሚ ኣብዡይ 20 ዓመታት ፍረኡ እንታይ ይመስል፧ ግለጻልና! ክንደይ ቁሸታት ወይ ትካላት ሃገርና’ከ ብነፋሳዊ ጸዓት ክጥቀማ ጀሚረን፧ ኣበይ አበይ’ከ ተርባይናት ናይ ነፋሳዊ ጸዓት መመንጨዊ ተተኪለን ንህዝቢ ጸዓት ብምፍልፋል ኣብ ግብሪ ውዒለን ጸገምን ሕጽረትን ጸዓት ኣብ ሃገርና ኣቓሊለን፧ ዶስ እቱይ መጽናዕቲ ሕጂውን ኣብ መስርሕ ኢዩ ዛሎ ግብራዊ ፍረ ኣየፍረየን፧ ብሕጂ’ከ ክንደይ ዓመታት ኢና ክንጽበ እቱይ መጽናዕቲ ግብራዊን ዚረአን ዚጭበጥን ፍረ ብምሃብ ኣብ ሃገራዊ ጸዓት እጃሙ ክሳብ ዚህብ፧ እዡይ ክንብል ካሎና ኣብ ምጽዋዕ፣ ባዳ፣ ደብረሲና፣ ሓዲሽ ዓዲ፣ ኢንገል፣ ኣዶብሓ፣ እምባትካላ፣ ኣስመራ፣ ዓሊግድር፣ ኣቆርደት፣ ዳህላክ፣ ዕዲ፣ ሓሽመት፣ ጢዖ፣ ናቕፋ፣ ከረን፣ ከርከበት፣ ዓረዛ፣ ቆሓይቶ፣ ማይላህም፣ ደቐምሓረ፣ ግዝግዛ፡ ዓሰብን ጋህሮን ወዘተን መጽናዕቲ ከምዝተገብረ ኣይዘንጋዕናዮን! :mrgreen:

ሩት ጓልያ ኣብርሃም ብዛዕባ ጸዓት ምሕንጣጥ ካብ ጀመርክን ደኣ፡ ጉዳይ እቱይ ሃገራት ዞባና እኒ ኬንያን ጦብያን ወዘተን ብመጠኑ ዝምዝምዝዎ ዛለው ጉዳይ ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓት’ከ ኣብ ሃገርና እንታይ ኣንፈት ኣለዎ ግለጽልና’ባ! ንምዃኑ’ከ እዛ ምጭውቲ ሃገረ ኤርትራ ጂኦተርማል ዚበሃል ናይ ጸዓት ኣማራጺ ኣለዋ ዲያ ወላስ የብላን፧ እንተልዩዋ’ከ ንግዜ መግዛእቲ ንጎድኒ ገዲፍና ካብ መዓልቲ ናጽነት ሃገረ ኤርትራ ክሳብ ለይቲ ሎሚ ብዛዕባ ዕቝር ተኽእሎ ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓት እንታይ ዓይነት ግብራዊ ስጉምትታት ተወሲዱ፧ ንጉዳይ ጸዓት ሃገርና ኣብ ምቕላል እንታይ ግደ’ከ ኣበርኪቱ ግለጻልና ኢኽን! ብርግጽ ኣብ ሃገርና ኤርትራ ከምቱይ ዚበሃጎ ሰጕሙ እንተዘይበልናኳ ጸሓያዊ ጸዓት ብውሱን ዓቕሚ ክትግበር ጀማሚሩ ከምዛሎ ንፈልጥ እንተ ንፋሳዊ ጸዓትን ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓትን ዛበርከትዎ እንተልዩ ግለጻልና ኢኽን።
:mrgreen:

Zmeselo
Senior Member+
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Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 17 Sep 2020, 06:36




Meleket
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Posts: 681
Joined: 16 Feb 2018, 05:08

Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Meleket » 17 Sep 2020, 09:29

ንሕዝቢን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ዘገድሶም ‘ጋዜጠይናታትና’ ኣብ መርበብ ሓበሬታታት እንታይ ጸሓፉ ወይ ድማ ሓደ ምዕራባዊ ዲፕሎማት ኮነ ኣምባሳደር ብዛዕባ ዕቝር ሃብቲ ሃገርና እንታይ በለ ኣይኾነን። እንታይ ደኣ፡ መምዘኒ ሕዝቢ ኤርትራ፡ ብግብሪ ኣብ መሬትን ባሕርን ሰማይን ኤርትራ እንታይ ዓይነት ፕሮጀክታት ተሓንጺጹ፣ እንታይ ግብራዊ እወንታዊ ውጽኢት ንህዝቢን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ሂቡ ትብል ሚዛናዊት ሕቶ ኢያ። ዕቝር ሃብቲ ቀይሕ ባሕሪ (ምስ ዓሳኡ ኮነ ነዳዲ መዳዲኡ) ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ ማለት፣ ዕቝር ንፋሳዊ ጸዓት ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡዪ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ ማለት፣ ዕቝር ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓት ኤርትራ ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡዪ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ፡ ወዘተ ማለት፤ “ክሳብ ሕዪ ብሰንኪ ዝተፈላለዩ ምክኒታት ንኣስታት 20 ዓመታት ከምቲ ዝድለን ከም ባህግናን ኣይሰጎምናን፡” ከም ማለት ኢያ ተስምዕ። ሕዪውን ከምዡይ ዓይነት ወጣሪን ፈታሺን ሕቶ እንተዘይተሓቲቱ፡ “ብምኩራት ጋዜጠይናታትና” ድሕሪ 20 ዓመታት’ውን ነዘን ናይ ጥበራ ቃላት ደጊምካ ምምጻእ ከይረኣ ወይ ድማ ሓደ ናይ ምብራቃዊ ደምበ ዲፕሎማት ከኣ ብዛዕባ ዕቝር ሃብቲ ኤርትራ ከምዡይ ቢሉ ቢልና ነብስና ከይንጥብርን ከይነዕሹን ቢልና ኢና ብኤርትራዊ ጭዉነት ንሓትትን ነዘካኽርን ዛሎና። እቱይ ንህዝብን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ዘገድስ፣ ህልውቲ ኤርትራ ነዘን ዕቝራት ሃብትታታ ኣብ ረብሓኣ ከተውዕሎ ጀሚራ’ዶ ወላስ ኣይፋል ኢያ። ህልዉቲ ኤርትራ ነዘን ኣምላኽ ብዘይውዳእ ልግሱ ዝጸገዋ ዕቝር ሃብትታታ ኣብ ረብሓ ሕዝባ ኣውዒላቶ’ዶ፧ ናብ ረብሓኣ ከተውዕሎ እንተዘይጀሚራ ድማ ስለምንታይ ቢልካ ምሕታት ግቡእ ኢዩ እዋኑውን ኢዩ፣ “ዋጣን ጭራ ዋጣን ደምበና” እነለልየሉ ጭዉነት ዝመልኦ ኤርትራዊ ኣገባብ ድማ ኢዩ፣ ሓቀይ’ዶ ደቂ ሃገር! :mrgreen:

Zmeselo
Senior Member+
Posts: 21593
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Zmeselo » 17 Sep 2020, 09:56

Meleket wrote:
17 Sep 2020, 09:29
ንሕዝቢን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ዘገድሶም ‘ጋዜጠይናታትና’ ኣብ መርበብ ሓበሬታታት እንታይ ጸሓፉ ወይ ድማ ሓደ ምዕራባዊ ዲፕሎማት ኮነ ኣምባሳደር ብዛዕባ ዕቝር ሃብቲ ሃገርና እንታይ በለ ኣይኾነን። እንታይ ደኣ፡ መምዘኒ ሕዝቢ ኤርትራ፡ ብግብሪ ኣብ መሬትን ባሕርን ሰማይን ኤርትራ እንታይ ዓይነት ፕሮጀክታት ተሓንጺጹ፣ እንታይ ግብራዊ እወንታዊ ውጽኢት ንህዝቢን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ሂቡ ትብል ሚዛናዊት ሕቶ ኢያ። ዕቝር ሃብቲ ቀይሕ ባሕሪ (ምስ ዓሳኡ ኮነ ነዳዲ መዳዲኡ) ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ ማለት፣ ዕቝር ንፋሳዊ ጸዓት ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡዪ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ ማለት፣ ዕቝር ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓት ኤርትራ ንመጻኢት ኤርትራ ከምዡዪ ኢዩ ከምቲ’ባ ኢዩ፡ ወዘተ ማለት፤ “ክሳብ ሕዪ ብሰንኪ ዝተፈላለዩ ምክኒታት ንኣስታት 20 ዓመታት ከምቲ ዝድለን ከም ባህግናን ኣይሰጎምናን፡” ከም ማለት ኢያ ተስምዕ። ሕዪውን ከምዡይ ዓይነት ወጣሪን ፈታሺን ሕቶ እንተዘይተሓቲቱ፡ “ብምኩራት ጋዜጠይናታትና” ድሕሪ 20 ዓመታት’ውን ነዘን ናይ ጥበራ ቃላት ደጊምካ ምምጻእ ከይረኣ ወይ ድማ ሓደ ናይ ምብራቃዊ ደምበ ዲፕሎማት ከኣ ብዛዕባ ዕቝር ሃብቲ ኤርትራ ከምዡይ ቢሉ ቢልና ነብስና ከይንጥብርን ከይነዕሹን ቢልና ኢና ብኤርትራዊ ጭዉነት ንሓትትን ነዘካኽርን ዛሎና። እቱይ ንህዝብን ሃገርን ኤርትራ ዘገድስ፣ ህልውቲ ኤርትራ ነዘን ዕቝራት ሃብትታታ ኣብ ረብሓኣ ከተውዕሎ ጀሚራ’ዶ ወላስ ኣይፋል ኢያ። ህልዉቲ ኤርትራ ነዘን ኣምላኽ ብዘይውዳእ ልግሱ ዝጸገዋ ዕቝር ሃብትታታ ኣብ ረብሓ ሕዝባ ኣውዒላቶ’ዶ፧ ናብ ረብሓኣ ከተውዕሎ እንተዘይጀሚራ ድማ ስለምንታይ ቢልካ ምሕታት ግቡእ ኢዩ እዋኑውን ኢዩ፣ “ዋጣን ጭራ ዋጣን ደምበና” እነለልየሉ ጭዉነት ዝመልኦ ኤርትራዊ ኣገባብ ድማ ኢዩ፣ ሓቀይ’ዶ ደቂ ሃገር! :mrgreen:
"Looking forward to discussing...." ይብል ስለዘሎ እቲ ኣምባሳደር: ምናልባት ገለ ዝሓሰቦ ነገር ዘሎዎ ይመስል: ዋላኳ ካብ እንግሊዝ ምጽባይ ከንቱ እንተኾነ:: እቲ ቅድሚ 20 ዓመታት: ቅድሚ ወያነ ኲናት ምእዋጃ ዝተፈተነ ምትካል ኣዕኑድ'ዉን: ብምትሕብባር SWECO ምስ ዝበሃል ሽወደናዊ ካምፓኒ ኢዩ ተሰላሲሉ::

Meleket
Member
Posts: 681
Joined: 16 Feb 2018, 05:08

Re: Prospects of Wind Energy in Eritrea

Post by Meleket » 18 Sep 2020, 03:46

ኦ ኤርትራ ዕቝር ነፋሳዊ ጸዓትኪ መኣስ ኢኺ ናብ ረብሓኺ ተውዕልዮ፧

ኦ ኤርትራ ዕቝር ጂኦተርማላዊ ጸዓትኪ መኣስ ኢኺ ናብ ረብሓኺ ተውዕልዮ፧

ኦ ኤርትራ ንኩሉ ዶባትኪ ብፍላይ ምስ ጦቢያ ዛሎ ዶባትኪ መኣስ ኢኺ ብግብሪ ኣብ ባይታ ትሕንጽጽዮ፧

ኦ ኤርትራ ሃገራዊ ቅዋምኺ መኣስ ኢኺ ምሉእ ብምሉእ ኣብ ግብሪ ተውዕልዮ፧

ኦ ኤርትራ ንቅዩዳትን ሕቡሳትን ደቅኪ ብምሉኦም መኣስ ኢኺ ምሕረት ትገብርሎም፧

ኦ ኤርትራ ኣብ ከብድኺ ዛሎ መኣስ ኢኺ’ከ ትወልድዮ፧ :mrgreen:

“እንድዒ” ዲዮም ዝበሉ ገዲም ድምጻዊ ነፍሲኄር ኣቶ ኣተወብርሃን ሰጊድ! “እንድዒ” ከይትብሊ እምበር!

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