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AbyssiniaLady
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Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 14 Sep 2020, 18:14

Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi



Before biting into that tuna fish sandwich, take a moment to recognize the remarkable creature that helped make it. Beyond a powerhouse of essential nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids, tuna travel in huge schools, are warm-blooded, can jump high out of the water, and have been known to team up with dolphins to protect themselves against sharks. Tuna also play an important role in oceanic ecosystems.


“The tuna’s role as a top predator means they help structure food webs around the world,” says Dr. Sarah Glaser, associate director of OEF’s Secure Fisheries program.

Tuna get around. Over 40 species of the fish can be found in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, as well as the Mediterranean Sea. They are highly migratory and tend to ignore national borders; their routes can connect distant ocean basins. Yet, their meat is universally enjoyed.


Northern Somali waters.



In the Somali region, where migratory fish, like tuna, make up more than 40 percent of the catch, OEF’s Shuraako program has facilitated investments for 22 businesses in the fishing sector, an industry that has the potential to boost the Somali economy and ensure long-term growth and stability in the region.




The species contributed $6.5 million to the Somali economy in 2010. Globally, yellowfin catches are worth $1.2 billion annually. The introduction of more efficient fishing gear, like drifting longlines and floating object purse seines, helped the tuna industry meet the global demand for tuna; but they also threaten its existence. In 2015, the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, a regional fisheries management organization of which Somalia is a member, declared yellowfin tuna stocks in danger of collapse. Other populations, like bluefin, are also threatened.

“Unfortunately, the world’s appetite for tuna means their populations are at risk from overfishing,” says Dr. Glaser.


Celebrating a Threatened Species

The United Nations General Assembly took notice and in 2016 voted to observe World Tuna Day on May 2nd in order to “raise awareness of the value of tuna, the threats facing tuna populations, and economic and social benefits of sustainably managed tuna stocks.”



Still, there is much work to be done to protect this important fish. Roberts, who has developed Project Badweyn, an interactive tool that maps Somali coastal resources, believes that strong reporting systems could help protect tuna migrations as they move across country boundaries.

“Regional cooperation and compliance is the only way to ensure everyone can get a piece of the tuna steak,” she writes.

Additionally, commercial fishers must realize that if they continue to overfish they will permanently lose their industry.

“In response, fishing companies and supermarkets are partnering with NGOs in a call for a 20 percent reduction in catch,” writes Roberts.

Observing World Tuna Day Everyday



It is our responsibility to be more conscious about where our fish is sourced. Apps like the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch help make it easy to choose products that have been sustainably fished or farmed. When it comes to yellowfin tuna, Seafood Watch recommends hand-line caught fish from the Western and Central Pacific Ocean. The app suggests avoiding bluefin tuna altogether.

“On World Tuna Day, I hope consumers take a minute to learn more about their favorite piece of sushi!” says Dr. Glaser.


https://oneearthfuture.org/news/learn-m ... iece-sushi
Last edited by AbyssiniaLady on 17 Sep 2020, 10:12, edited 2 times in total.

AbyssiniaLady
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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 14 Sep 2020, 20:45

The Somali Fisheries Industry, a Potential Gold-Mine






Somalia has a total land area of 637,657 square kilometers, and the longest coastline in mainland Africa of 3,330 km. As many experts attest, it has one of the most important marine ecosystems in the Indian Ocean known as the Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystem (ASCLME 2012). The continental shelf area covers a surface of 32500 Km2 and is generally narrow, varying in width between 5 and 15 Km, with exception of 135 Km stretch in the North East where the average width is 70 Km (ASCLME 2012) With this long coastline and a good productive up‐welling region off the northeast coast of Puntland, Somalia has a high fisheries production potential. Surveys of Somali waters by the Sea Around Us Project, Oceana, University of British Columbia & Pew Environment Group, FAO and others confirm that there are significant fish stocks, These waters are some of the richest fishing grounds in the the world while still remainas one of the country’s untapped resources.

The coastal and marine ecosystems include a wide diversity of habitats that serve as important breeding, nursery and feeding grounds for many species, local and migratory species. These include coral reefs, sea grass beds, mangrove forests, estuaries and lagoons, and areas of coastal up‐welling, However, Somalia lack the resources to protect its vast Exclusive Economic Zones, which extend 200 nautical miles out to sea, and are increasingly targeted by European and Asian illegal fishing fleets. The impacts of Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing in Somalia is estimated that the annual loss due to IUU fishing in the Somali waters is around US$500 million.

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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 15 Sep 2020, 12:15

Tesco to stop buying IOTC yellowfin tuna unless catches are cut.

By Undercurrent News Sep. 8, 2020 10:25 BST .

(The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) or La Commission des Thons de l'Océan Indien (CTOI) is another name for European Somali seafood dealers.)


(European fishing zones in Somali waters, Red dot means a lot of school tuna fish.)

UK supermarket chain Tesco has warned it will stop sourcing yellowfin tuna and billfish from the Indian Ocean for its own brand supply unless a recovery plan for rebuilding stocks is adopted at the next Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) in November. Tesco's yellowfin is sold as frozen or chilled steaks; its canned tuna is produced from skipjack.

The yellowfin tuna stock in the Indian Ocean is not being managed successfully due to the mix of coastal states and distant water fishing nations failing to adopt catch reduction measures proposed by the IOTC’s scientists, the retailer said. "These catch reductions would help the stock recover from its current status of ‘overfished.


IOTC’s existing fishery management practices have proved ineffective and robust recovery plans have not been set. Without these, declining tuna populations threaten to impact the entire marine ecosystem.
The supermarket chain has thus pledged to stop sourcing Indian Ocean yellowfin should the member states at the IOTC meeting "fail to agree a credible and effective recovery plan to rebuild the population within two generations.

Should that happen, its advocacy and efforts in the area will continue through the Global Tuna Alliance (GTA) -- an independent group of retailers and suppliers which are committed to improving tuna sustainability and human rights in tuna fisheries as well as its partnership with WWF, it said.
Tesco has already frozen its volumes for IOTC-sourced yellowfin and billfish, it noted, while it has been advocating for change. "In 2019, Tesco joined other retailers and NGOs to call for the catch reductions recommended by the IOTC’s scientists to be put in place and commit to an effective rebuilding plan.

With international collaboration and precautionary management measures, the Indian Ocean has great potential to have flourishing fisheries to feed local communities as well as the global growing demand for seafood. We hope the IOTC members reach an agreement for a robust yellowfin rebuilding plan in November.

https://www.undercurrentnews.com/2020/0 ... es-are-cut

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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 15 Sep 2020, 12:41

According to EU Fisheries Control Regulation (FCR), It is estimated that at least sixty-five percent of the EU fish that are fished in the Indian Ocean are caught illegally in Somalia, One of the main driving forces behind illegal fishing in Somali waters is a growing demand for seafood in Europe and Asia..

With almost 95% of European fish stocks are fully exploited and, thus the European Union is stealing fish from areas far beyond its borders, especially Somalia., However, The EU think it has a divine right to access to Somali waters for its fishing fleets as a reciprocal benefit for the little aid it gives to Somalia.

Somalis are being robbed of their natural resources.




One surprising fact, Almost all canned tuna sold in Australia comes directly from Thailand fishing vessels in Somalia, because the sea closer to Thailand is already empty.


Sources, Australia government website.

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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 15 Sep 2020, 14:44

Ethiopia needs to compete with European & other countries in Somali waters.


Christian Friis Bach.

Former Minister for development cooperation in Denmark, Mr. Christian Friis Bach, paid a courtesy visit to Somaliland, While speaking to the press last week, he said that he came to Somaliland in order to implement development project concerning the nation’s fish industry, He announced that he wants to set up fish processing plant in Berbera in the foreseeable future which will have the capability to export fish to Denmark and other countries.

It became harder to catch fish in Denmark waters, there is less and less fish.


Friis said, My name is Christian Friis Bach, I am the ex-development cooperation minister for Denmark, I am here to provide an opportunity to support Somali’s fish industry, He said that he sees good prospects to develop the fish industry, Friis said, We see a chance to develop the fish industry and that is the reason I am currently on a visit to Somaliland, He said IFU is funding the project (IFU) Investment Fund for Developing Countries, is a Development Financial Institution owned by the Government of Denmark.

According to Demark (IFU), the idea to develop the fishing industry in northern Somalia started in 2012 when American Arsenault Family Foundation made the first donation of USD 20.000 for a fact-finding mission in northern Somalia whose purpose was to see if fishery was possible and how.

The results showed there was no fishery infrastructure at all and everything had to be built from scratch. It was then decided to not choose one local partner, but to be inclusive and welcome anyone interested to cooperate.


Now the first step for Ethiopia to compete with the Somali waters looters is to build its own fishing industry in Djibouti, I am sure Ethiopia will be allowed to fish in Somali waters in exchange for annual payments.

Map maritime boundary Somalia and Yemen.

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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) » 15 Sep 2020, 15:09

The agame AbyssiniaLady/eden/kerenite/Abebe B.... survives on a grasshopper diet in his native insignificant Kilil of Tigray. :P :P :P




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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 16 Sep 2020, 15:25

Last edited by AbyssiniaLady on 17 Sep 2020, 10:11, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Learn More About Your Favorite Piece of Sushi

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 16 Sep 2020, 16:13





Somali fish stocks are managed by the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC), an intergovernmental organisation made of countries illegally plundering Somali waters the UK, the EU, China, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan etc.

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Re: Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 17 Sep 2020, 10:31

The Somali marine ecosystem is rich in a diversity of living resources. Dynamic oceanographic features attract migratory tuna, billfishes, sharks, whale shark, humpback whale and hammerhead shark, Warm tropical waters nurture coral reef systems that are home to hundreds of species of marine life, and highly productive open waters support schooling pelagic creatures such as sardines and squid. Yet Somali domestic fisheries are significantly under-capitalized when compared with those of neighboring countries in East Africa.

Somali fishing boats.



Development of the fishery sector during the 1980s stalled after Somalia’s civil war began in 1991, and the catch of marine life by domestic fleets has remained moderate ever since. Recently, interest in developing Somali fisheries has grown within multiple groups fishers, entrepreneurs, and politicians within Somalia expatriate communities outside Somalia and international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and development agencies, the global fishing industry and venture capital firms specializing in frontier and emerging markets.



In these warm tropical Somali waters, foreign fishers, especially, Europeans and Asians, harvested fish with impunity since last few decades, With the collapse of the Somali government in 1991 and absence of political and law enforcement authority, IUU fishing increased many folds in Somali waters. Foreign fishers moved in and took away millions of tonnes of fish, Currently sold by most major supermarkets in Europe, North America, The Middle East, Australia and Asia.

Sources.
UN Data
United Nations Statistics Division
The United Nations Environment Programme.

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Re: Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 18 Sep 2020, 12:07

Developing a Cold Chain Infrastructure for the Somali Fishing Industry.

Sep 15, 2020 in Regional and International Coordination.



At the UN75 Global Governance Forum on September 17th, Secure Fisheries will announce the partnership “Developing a Cold Chain Infrastructure for the Somali Fishing Industry,” which brings together the private sector, government, and civil society to address the challenge of low profit margins, poor seafood quality, and limited market size in Somali fisheries.




The Somali marine environment has the potential to produce hundreds of millions of dollars of seafood each year while providing high quality protein to a country facing famine and drought. One Earth Future, the Somalia Seafood Exporters Association, the Global Cold Chain Alliance, and the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation have teamed up with the Ministries of Fisheries in Somalia and the state of Puntland to develop a pilot project combining technical training, best practices, infrastructure such as solar-powered cold storage, and data collection in Somali fishing communities.

Our aim is to provide efficient, low-cost technology and skills to fishing communities and seafood companies to develop the domestic market for seafood while improving processing quality to open up export markets. By reducing spoilage and increasing profits, this project promotes coastal livelihoods and sustainable use of the marine environment, pillars of SDG 14. The Cold Catch project advances the global call contained in the UN75 Declaration by strengthening the resilience of Somali coastal communities as they prepare for the unexpected effects of climate change.

BACKGROUND

Cold chain development is essential for improving food security in least developed countries (LDCs). Reduced food losses and improved food quality in the fishing industry, especially, create opportunities to expand markets for sea-based protein and improvethe stability and value of the fishing industry.

At over 3,333 km in length, the Somali region has the longest coastline in mainland Africa. The productive fishing grounds on the region’s continental shelf provide opportunities for job creation, economic growth, and food security, but the industry’s growth is limited by the lack of reliable infrastructure, especially cold chain. Somali coastal communities’ economies and livelihood security depend on fishing, but inefficient fishing and processing methodscombined with low access to ice and cold storage mean fish often spoil before they reach the market. This translates to lost profits for fishers. Moreover, low quality handling standards mean many products are not suitable for export, further limiting potential profits. Improving the cold chain in Somali communities would immediately benefit fishers, processors, and others involved in the sector by creating opportunities to expand the market for Somali fish and increase profits without increasing fishing pressure.

We propose a pilot project to develop cold chain infrastructure to improve connections for the Bander Beyla lobster fishery to domestic and export markets. Bander Beyla is a remote coastal village in the state of Puntland, northeast Somalia. Their lucrative lobster fishery can supply domestic markets (e.g., hotels in the inland capital Garowe) and export markets (e.g., export to Dubai), but the fishing community repeatedly expresses a need for cold chain infrastructure to move their harvest beyond the local market. Without access to ice, fishers are unable to chill their catch while at sea, so time spent fishing is limited, and some of what reaches the landing site has already spoiled. There are no cold storage facilities to store the fresh catch and a lack of refrigerated trucks put fish at a high risk of spoilage en route to larger markets. A cold chain infrastructure would allow Bander Beyla’s fishers to extend their fishing hours, decrease wasted harvest, extend their product shelf life from catch to consumer, improve product quality, and transport to a wider market.

Existing relationships in Bander Beyla facilitated this choice. Secure Fisheries, a program of One Earth Future, has worked there for over a year on community development and fisheries governance projects. Shuraako, a program of One Earth Future that connects Somali entrepreneurs with impact capital investors (such as Norfund and DANIDA) and provides portfolio management, has had a major client, Corno African Fishing Company (CAFCO), in the community since 2014. There are smaller fishing companies in the community that do not currently get investment support. This project would incorporate these small-scale fishers into a more accessible cold chain solution.

Sources, securefisheries.
https://securefisheries.org/sites/defau ... t_note.pdf

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Re: Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 20 Sep 2020, 18:03



Sources, the European union official website.

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Re: Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 20 Sep 2020, 18:14

Lots of people know about the piracy in Somali waters in recent years, with mass coverage from the so called western media, However, many people don’t know European are the ones who loot the Somali seas and destroy the oceans, European and Asian thieves are breaching international maritime law and plundering Somalia’s wealth of millions of dollars a year.

Hundreds of industrial Europeans, Asians and Middle Easterners ships are fishing illegally in the territorial waters of Somalia, home to one of the world’s greatest marine ecosystems.


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Re: Somalia loses $500 million annually to foreign illegal fishing

Post by AbyssiniaLady » 24 Sep 2020, 12:10

The occasion of the World Maritime Day.

Sep-24-2020 by Chris Reynolds. EU Head of Mission


(Central Somalia)

Today we are celebrating the world’s seas and oceans and their importance for our environment, economy and culture. Somali waters give access to the Red Sea via the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean. The theme of this year’s World Maritime Day is ‘Sustainable Shipping for a Sustainable Planet’ and Somalia has a role to play. If we want future generations to inherit healthy and productive oceans, we need to take good care of our maritime resources today. Sustainability is not merely a concept, it has to become a reality for the benefit of all, including the Somali People.

Role of Security towards Achieving Stability and Sustainability.

There cannot be sustainability without stability, and there is no stability without Security. Somalia has adopted a Somali Maritime Resource and Security Strategy. Similarly, the European Council adopted in 2018 the European Union Maritime Security Strategy. Within this framework, the European Union is supporting regional ownership of maritime capacity; and Somali ownership of its Maritime Domain.

EUCAP, the European Union Capacity Building Mission, is established to support the development of Somali Maritime Security Capacities, within the Somali law enforcement system, in line with the internationally recognised ‘Coast Guard Functions’.

Sustainability Requires Legal Framework.

Recent years have seen spectacular progress in Somalia towards joining international standards. This is evidenced by the adhesion to International conventions like MARPOL and SOLAS, the adoption of the Somali Shipping Code, the drafting of Somali Fisheries law being the most significant steps.

Shipping Industry standards are evolving, towards environmental preservation. Somali regulations are developed taking into account IMO goals on energy use in ships.

Self-Sustainability is Critical for Building Maritime Capabilities.

The European Union is supporting the equipping and training of Maritime Police Units and Coast Guards in Somalia through development programs and with the EUCAP Somalia Mission.

EUCAP Somalia is engaged to support Somali agencies in the maritime sector, to establish a Maritime Rescue Coordination Center (MRCC) and a Maritime Operation Center with the Somali Maritime Agency. EUCAP Somalia will continue to assist Somali inter-sectorial mechanisms and inter-agency cooperation.

Preservation of the Blue Economy through Sustainability Approach.

Somalia has vast potential to develop its activities in the Maritime Sector.‘Blue Economy’ offers huge potential to provide employment, support coastal communities and various marine businesses and industries; contributing to the resilience of our society.

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become even more important to come together and explore the opportunities presented by our coasts and oceans.

Women have an important role in the Maritime Sector.

Women have been the breadwinners in times of war. They prove daily that they are able just like their male counterparts to take part in economic activities in the maritime sector. EUCAP Somalia will continue to support empowering Somali women in the maritime sector contributing to environmental and socio-economic sustainability.

EUCAP is Committed to Somalia.

EUCAP Somalia, as part of the EU Integrated Approach, together with EU Naval Force Atalanta and EU development programmes, remains committed to continue its ongoing support to the Somali Maritime Sector, and Somalia’s integration in the Regional Maritime Domain.

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