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Zmeselo
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Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

SAWA!

Post by Zmeselo » 13 Jan 2020, 07:03



Seminar to students of Warsai-Yikealo school

http://shabait.com/news/local-news/2993 ... alo-school



Sawa, 10 January 2020- The Chairman of the National Union of Eritrean Youth and Students, Mr. Saleh Ahmedin conducted a seminar on 4 January to students of the Warsai-Yikealo school in Sawa; focusing on the objective situation and timely role of the youth in the political and developmental activities in the country.

Indicating that for the past 80 years the Eritrean youth had to go through multiple challenges, Mr. Saleh said that the Eritrean youth have paid heavy price for independence and safeguarding the national sovereignty and have emerged victorious.

Mr. Saleh went on to say that love of country, common psychological make up, self confidence, self-reliance, national unity and stance as well as standing in unison against external conspiracies are among the noble values of the Eritrean youth, and called for transferring the values to posterity.

Mr. Saleh also gave briefing on the new era unfolding, vis-à-vis its opportunities and challenges.

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“There is excitement in the challenge; after all, it is a shared challenge!”

Written by Billion Temesghen

http://shabait.com/articles/q-a-a/29943 ... -challenge

Articles - Q & A

Young Eritreans working in various projects of national development, are not just many in number but also wholeheartedly devoted to their people. Selam Teklay, is one of the many. After graduating from the Eritrean College of Agriculture, she’s been serving at the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) as an expert in the Migratory Pest Control Unit (MPCU). She and her team are always on the vanguard, to prevent and control pest infestation. Their efforts and expertise play key roles, in the Nation’s endeavors to ensure food security. Q&A introduces you to Selam Teklay, who gives us a glimpse of the MOA’s efforts to control migratory pests with a view to ultimately ensuring good harvest.



It is nice, to have you here with us today. Let’s start with a small introduction.

Hello and thank you! I am an expert of the Migratory Pest Control Unit, in The Ministry of Agriculture. I did elementary school in a village called Zuwl and for my junior and senior secondary education, I went to Mai Nefhi Secondary School. Then, I went to Sawa and joined college afterwards. I studied: Plant Protection.

So this was your passion, from the get go.

I knew I wanted to study, either medicine or anything that has to do with life. So, when I first went to college, plant protection was my first choice; as it was something that I’ve always wanted to learn.

What is it like, to work as an expert at the MOA’s MPCU?

I have been working there for four years and it has been very interesting. The department first comprised the Plant Protection Unit but from there our unit branched out in a bid to strengthen it. Eritrea’s geography, makes it a pest breeding area. As part of the overall national development and food security plan, the prevention and control of pest infestation is one of the many priorities of the Eritrean Ministry of Agriculture. It is something that our unit, takes very seriously and diligently.

Trans-border pest infestation or local outbreak of some birds, desert locust and armyworms is something the local media disseminate to raise people’s awareness. And, what would be your office’s effort towards it?

It is complex but if I may put it in few words, I’d start by mentioning that Eritrea is one of the countries that breeds desert locust. Our sea shores, are recession areas for some pests. What’s important is that although we have recession areas, we control the outbreak or spread of pests. Our mission is to ensure the harvest is intact, despite the odds. So, when it is the rainy season in these areas, we are on standby from September to late December. We fist conduct surveys and put out a forecast. We analyze the behaviors of the pests and from there, we take measures.

What are yours and your colleagues’ days like, at work?

They are hectic. We are always on standby. There are pests that we are used to and some that are new. Therefore, we focus on learning new behaviors and we quickly set out to control them before any damage is done. For example, armyworm infestation is not common in our parts. When it happened lately, for many of us, including myself, it was a new experience. A very challenging and demanding one. We are not stationed in one place. Season after season, we’re always on the move.



I can dare say, that pest infestation isn’t something people in the highlands are alarmed by. And the reason is because they just think there isn’t any. We rarely see pests.That is thanks to the joint and restless effort of our branches and, most importantly, farming communities of the lowlands. They are first of all very knowledgeable about comportments of the pests and their indigenous knowledge is praiseworthy. We come in, only after them. Our work wouldn’t have been as fruitful, had it not been for them. People in the highlands don’t know much, about pest outbreaks. They have never seen swarms on their plantations. And, this evidently explains why people don’t experience pest infestations. The MOA and its branches, jointly with partners and farmers, work to prevent and eliminate any infestation as it can be very dangerous.

What can you say about people’s awareness of this issue?

So, like I said before, in the highland people forget about pests. But they should very well be aware. In other parts of the country, the awareness of the people is commendable. There have been commendable efforts made to spread awareness but we shouldn’t still relax, as there is more that could be done.

Is your job challenging, since you’re always on the move? Do you have any plans to settle at the MOA Headquarters and maybe start a family or something?

Since I am a woman, my entire job is very challenging. I am always on the move and I miss out on so many things. But, I love my job. There is excitement in the challenge, as it is a shared challenge. I do want to settle. I am 28 years old now and that is definitely a big part of my plans. However, I don’t think I’ll ever quit my job for it.

Well, thank you and best of luck!

Pleasure!

Zmeselo
Senior Member
Posts: 18146
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: SAWA!

Post by Zmeselo » 13 Jan 2020, 07:13

ab’he bada: a volcanic lake

Saturday, 11 January 2020

Written by Sona Berhane

http://shabait.com/categoryblog/29941-a ... anic-lake-


Ab’he Bada is a natural lake found in the town of Bada, Ghel’alo sub-zone.

Bada is around 220 km south of Massawa and is reached through the main stretch of road, that leads to the port town of Assab. At Marsa Fatma, this main road is left behind as one diverges to the right and passes through Ada’ayto.

This pathway, however, is unlike the previous one. It makes for a rough 111 km ride, across the dry land. The town of Bada is finally reached and soon after, 14 km to the North West, is Lake Bada.

Lake Bada is locally known as: Ab’he Bada. In the Afar tongue, Ab’he Bada translates into “smelly lake”. Interestingly, Lake Bada is a clear and pristine body of water. The lake is said to feature in some of the local folklore. Presumably, one of these tales gave rise to the name “smelly lake”.

Lakes are formed due to various geological mechanisms on the surface of the earth, such as tectonic, volcanic and glacial activities. Lake Bada is a volcanic lake; that is, a lake which forms in the volcanic crater after the volcano has been inactive for some time. The collapse of magma chambers leads to the development of very large surface craters called calderas. This process is a significant source of such basins.

Calderas or volcanic lakes typically exhibit great depth and a high encircling rim. Lake Bada has a surface area of 20 km square. Its depth, however, is not so easy to determine. Instead of a gradually sloping bed that grows deeper towards the center, Lake Bada has a linear base that causes it to have very little difference in the overall depth, which means that the water at the edge of the lake is as deep as that in the center. From a distance, this volcanic lake has the daunting appearance of a high, gaping, empty crater.



Most lakes are fed by river channels and streams. Some lakes, though, do not appear to have any water coming into them. These are actually fed by underground springs. Lake Bada is found along the vast desert of the Danakil Depression. Rainfall in this area is very little. When there is rain, the rate of evaporation far exceeds that of percolation because the temperature is extremely high, reaching up to 50 degrees. The water that manages to infiltrate underground appears to come out through a fault, in the form of a geyser in Lake Bada. Unlike other hot springs in the Northern Red Sea, the one in Lake Bada is warm, not boiling. Given its proximity to the Danakil Depression, one of the lowest, hottest and saltiest places on earth, it comes as no surprise that Lake Bada contains salt water. Of course, the Danakil Depression itself also stimulates interest because it is currently right in the middle of an ongoing geological phenomenon, namely the East African Rift which is a crack in the surface of the earth that runs north and south for about 6400 km. But that is a story for another article.

In spite of its being surrounded by hills of sand, or because of it, Lake Bada may seem like a miraculous haven amid the harsh scorch of the region. Nearby is a spring that serves as a source of drinking water for the local inhabitants.

Unlike the lake, the water that bubbles out of this spring is clean and surprisingly cool. Trees populate the patch of land alongside the spring. This land is used by locals during the dry season for shepherding and grazing.



Like all geological changes, the formation of Lake Bada took many years. Unfortunately it is not accurately known how old Lake Bada is. This volcanic lake is one of the numerous striking geographical sites in Eritrea that have hitherto remained undiscovered or unexplored. These places not only have immense historic and economic significance but also possess great aesthetic value. They are sublime and otherworldly in their beauty. The 30-year war for independence, followed by the 20-year long unrest in the region, has considerably delayed scientific and exploratory expeditions. Such expeditions could and would unlock the geological and archaeological potential that Eritrea holds.

pastlast
Member
Posts: 1609
Joined: 19 May 2019, 18:02

Re: SAWA!

Post by pastlast » 13 Jan 2020, 22:49

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!


SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!


SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!


SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!


SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!


SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

SCHITMESELO WHEN WILL YOU FINALLY ENLIST INTO SAWA...ANTA GOHAAF KEDAA TRAITOR!

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