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Awash
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Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 29 Dec 2019, 11:15


Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Zmeselo » 29 Dec 2019, 11:40



Qatar
Events of 2017


https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2018/c ... ters/qatar

Qatar faced a diplomatic crisis in 2017, as some of its neighbors cut diplomatic ties with it over its alleged support of terrorism and its closeness with Iran—claims that Qatar rejects.

The move in early June by Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates—and their subsequent issuance with Egypt of a list of 13 demands for ending the crisis, which Qatar rejected—isolated the Gulf state and precipitated serious human rights violations of individuals living in Qatar, infringing on their right to free expression, separating families, and interrupting medical care and education. At time of writing, travel to and from Qatar was restricted, and its border with Saudi Arabia remained closed.

Gulf Crisis

On June 5, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the UAE cut diplomatic relations with Qatar over its alleged support of terrorism and its closeness with Iran and ordered the expulsion of Qatari citizens and the return of their citizens from Qatar within 14 days.

On June 23, the three countries and Egypt issued a list of 13 demands for ending the crisis that included shutting down Al Jazeera and other media they claim are Qatar- funded; downgrading diplomatic ties with Iran; severing ties with “terrorist organizations,” including the Muslim Brotherhood, and expelling people associated with such organizations from Qatar; and paying reparations to other Gulf countries for “loss of life” and “other financial losses” resulting from Qatar’s policies.

Qatar rejected the demands.

Residency Reforms

On August 3, 2017, the Qatari cabinet approved a draft law that will allow permanent residence for children of Qatari women married to non-Qataris, as well as expatriates who “provide outstanding services to Qatar.”

Qatar does not allow dual nationality and discriminates against women by not allowing them to pass nationality to their children on the same basis as men. Qatar allows men to pass citizenship to their children, whereas children of Qatari women and non-citizen men can only apply for citizenship under narrow conditions.

Under the 2005 law on acquisition of Qatari nationality, people who have lived in Qatar for more than 25 years may apply for nationality, with priority for those with Qatari mothers, under specific conditions. However, the government has not consistently approved such applications. If enacted, the draft law would help people whose mothers are Qatari nationals to secure resident status in Qatar even if they do not have valid passports from another country. However, it still falls short of granting women the same rights as Qatari men to pass citizenship to their children.

The Qatari draft law’s provision of permanent residence to migrants who “provide outstanding services to Qatar” also could help Emirati, Egyptian, Bahraini, and Saudi nationals affected by the diplomatic crisis. Many have chosen to remain in Qatar for family or work reasons or because they fear persecution in their home countries.

Under the law, the Interior Ministry is to establish a committee to review requests for permanent residency IDs. But it was not clear at time of writing whether the committee would grant residency to those who fear persecution or harm in their countries of origin. Qatar does not have a law on asylum and has not ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention.

Migrant Domestic Workers

On August 22, 2017, the emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, ratified Law No.15 on service workers in the home. The cabinet adopted the law in February, which will grant labor protections for the first time to Qatar’s 173,742 domestic workers. The new law guarantees domestic workers a maximum 10-hour workday, a weekly rest day, three weeks of annual leave, an end-of-service payment of at least three weeks per year, and healthcare benefits.

However, the new law is still weaker than the Labor Law and does not fully conform to the International Labour Organization (ILO) Domestic Workers Convention, the global treaty on domestic workers’ rights. The new law establishes fines for violations, but lacks provisions for enforcement, such as workplace inspections, including in homes where domestic workers are employed. The law does not state how workers can claim their rights if they have been breached except in cases of compensation for work injuries. Workers in Qatar are not allowed to form a union or entitled to a minimum wage established by law.

Construction Workers

Qatar has a migrant labor force of nearly 2 million people, who comprise approximately 95 percent of its total labor force. Approximately 40 percent, or 800,000, of these workers are employed in construction. Current heat protection regulations for most workers in Qatar only prohibit outdoor work from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. from June 15 to August 31. But climate data shows that weather conditions in Qatar outside those hours and dates frequently reach levels that can result in potentially fatal heat-related illnesses without rest.

In 2013, health authorities reported 520 deaths of workers of whom 385, or 74 percent, died from unexplained causes. Qatari public health officials have not responded to requests for information about the overall number and causes of deaths of migrant workers since 2012.

A 2014 report that the Qatari government commissioned from the international law firm DLA Piper noted that the number of worker deaths in Qatar attributed to cardiac arrest, a general term that does not specify cause of death, was “seemingly high.” Authorities have failed to implement two of the report’s key recommendations: reforming its laws to allow autopsies or post-mortem examinations in cases of “unexpected or sudden deaths” and commissioning an independent study into the seemingly high number of deaths vaguely attributed to cardiac arrest.

On October 26, the International Trade Union Confederation announced Qatar’s agreement to extensive reforms of the current kafala (sponsorship) system, to institute a nondiscriminatory minimum wage, to improve payment of wages, to end document confiscation, to enhance labor inspections and occupational safety and health systems including by developing a heat mitigation strategy, to refine the contractual system to improve labor recruitment procedures, and to step up efforts to prevent forced labor.

These measures would be pathbreaking for Gulf countries where migrants make up most of the labor force, but the announcement gives little detail on how laws will be amended, how the changes will be carried out, or the timeframe for their implementation.

Women’s Rights, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity

Qatar’s Law No. 22 of 2006 on Family and Personal Status continues to discriminate against women. Under article 36, a marriage contract is valid when a woman’s male guardian concludes the contract and two male witnesses are present. Article 58 states that it is a wife’s responsibility to look after the household and to obey her husband.

Other than article 57 of the family law forbidding husbands from hurting their wives physically or morally, and general provisions on assault, the penal code does not criminalize domestic violence or marital rape.

Qatar’s penal code punishes “sodomy” with one to three years in prison. Muslims convicted of zina (sex outside of marriage) can be sentenced to flogging (if unmarried) or the death penalty (if married). Non-Muslims can be sentenced to imprisonment.

Key International Actors

Qatar was a member of the Saudi-led coalition that began a military campaign in Yemen in March 2015 but Qatar withdrew its forces from the operation in June 2017. The coalition has conducted thousands of airstrikes in Yemen, including scores that appear to violate the laws of war, some of which may be war crimes. However, coalition members, including Qatar, have provided insufficient or no information about the role that particular countries’ forces are playing in alleged unlawful attacks.

Qatar purchased at least US$18 billion in weapons during 2017, of which at least $12 billion was from the United States. In June, reacting to the isolation of Qatar by neighboring states, Turkey's parliament fast-tracked the approval of an April 2016 agreement with Qatar on the implementation of Turkish troops' deployment to a military base in Qatar, and the two countries began carrying out joint military exercises.

pastlast
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Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by pastlast » 29 Dec 2019, 16:49



Eritrea
Events of 2017


https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2018/c ... rs/eritrea

Eritrea remains a one-man dictatorship under President Isaias Afewerki, now in his 26th year in power. It has no legislature, no independent civil society organizations or media outlets, and no independent judiciary. The government restricts religious freedoms, banning all but four groups.

Every Eritrean must serve an indeterminate period of “national service” after turning 18, with many ending up serving for well over a decade. Some are assigned to civil service positions, while most are placed in military units, where they effectively work as forced laborers on private and public works projects.

Largely because of the oppressive nature of the Isaias rule and the prolonged national service, about 12 percent of Eritrea’s population has fled the country. In 2016 alone, 52,000 escaped, according to the latest United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) report.

In June, the United Nations special rapporteur on Eritrea reported to the Human Rights Council that there can be “no sustainable solution to the refugee outflows until the government complies with its human rights obligations.” The council echoed her call for reform in a resolution calling on Eritrea to end indefinite conscription and forced labor. It also urged the African Union (AU) to investigate government abuses so that perpetrators can be brought to justice.

Indefinite Military Service and Forced Labor
Abuse in national service is rampant and is the principal reason why thousands flee the country annually. Service lasts over a decade although the proclamation establishing national service limits conscription to 18 months. A UN Commission of Inquiry in 2016 characterized the system as “enslavement.”

Conscripts are subjected to 72-hour work weeks, severe arbitrary punishment, rape by commanders if female, and grossly inadequate food rations. Pay increased after 2014, but deductions for food limited the increase, and net pay remained inadequate to support a family.

Freedom of Speech, Expression, and Association
President Isaias, freed from all institutional restraints, uses well-documented tactics of repression, showing little signs of easing up in 2017. The populace is closely monitored. Offenses include seeming to question authority attempting to avoid national service or to flee the country, practicing an “unrecognized” religion, or simply offending someone in authority. After witnessing the ordeal family members and others face when trying to exercise their rights, ordinary citizens have come to realize they are not allowed any rights.

Eritreans are subject to arbitrary imprisonment. Arrest and harsh punishment including torture, are at the whim of security force commanders without trial or appeal. Few are told the reason for their arrests. Imprisonment is indefinite and often incommunicado; some arrestees disappear altogether. For example, an individual was arrested and held since 2002 but never charged and not allowed visits or other communications with his family for 15 years. His body was released to his family in August.

The government issued a new criminal procedure code in 2015 but its significant procedural safeguards, requiring warrants for arrest, access to defense counsel, and the right to habeas corpus petitions, remain largely unimplemented.

In September 2001, the government closed all independent newspapers and arrested their editors and leading journalists. None were brought to trial. They remain in solitary detention. There are reliable reports that about half of them had died. In May 2017, Dawit Isaac, not seen since 2005, received United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s World Press Freedom Prize.

Eleven former high-level officials who criticized Isaias’s rule have also been imprisoned and held incommunicado since 2001. Eritrea has ignored calls by the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the Human Rights Council to release them or at least bring them to trial.

After a former minister defected in 2012, Isaias had his then-15-year old daughter, a United States citizen, his 87-year-old grandfather, and 38-year-old son arrested. All three remain jailed without trial.

Freedom of Religion
In 2002, Eritrea required all religious groups to register but refused to register any except Sunni Islam and the Eritrean Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Evangelical (Lutheran) churches.

The government exercises strict control over these religious groups. It deposed the Eritrean Orthodox patriarch in 2006, placed him under house arrest, and imposed a successor on the church. In July 2017, the octogenarian former patriarch was brought to a church service for the first time in 11 years but not allowed to speak. A contemporaneous church announcement blamed the patriarch for association with heresy but claimed the “issue” had been resolved. He has not been seen since.

Reliable sources reported as many as 170 arrests of Evangelical Christians in May to June alone. Some reportedly were sent to an infamous Red Sea Dahlak Island prison. It has become usual in Eritrea for security personnel to raid private homes where devotees of unrecognized religions meet for communal prayer. Repudiation of their religion is typically the price of release.

In October, the government suppressed protests by students at a private Islamic school in Asmara, Al Diaa, against a planned government takeover. The protests were triggered by the arrest of the school’s nonagenarian honorary president after he objected to the takeover. Arrests of other school officials followed. The government had previously announced it planned to convert all religious schools into government-administered institutions.

Jehovah’s Witnesses remain especially persecuted. As of August, 53 were imprisoned for attending religious meetings or for conscientious objection, including three arrested over 23 years ago, in 1994.

Refugees
Fleeing Eritreans faced increased hostility in several countries. Sudan forcibly returned over 100 asylum seekers, including about 30 minors, to Eritrea in 2017. UNHCR criticized the expulsions as “a serious violation of international refugee law.” In 2016, Sudan had repatriated 400 Eritreans who were promptly arrested upon their return, according to a UN Commission of Inquiry report. Whether any have been released since is speculative because of government secrecy and the absence of independent monitors.

Until early 2013, Israel prevented tens of thousands of Eritreans from lodging asylum claims. As of end of 2015, Israel had recognized only five Eritrean asylum seekers as refugees. It has tried to coerce others to leave by imprisoning, or threatening to imprison indefinitely, those who refuse to leave “voluntarily.” In August 2017, the Israeli High Court of Justice held that authorities could detain those who refuse to leave for no longer than 60 days. The justice minister immediately proposed amending Israeli law to circumvent the court decision.

A Swiss court held in 2017 that an Eritrean woman who had not proved she had deserted national service could be presumed not to face punishment on return. The UN special rapporteur on migration criticized a similar earlier Swiss court decision because the court had no real evidence that involuntary returnees would not be prosecuted. Eritreans make up the largest group of asylum seekers in Switzerland.

Eritreans traveling from the Horn of Africa to Europe face grave dangers during their journey, including rape, being held for ransom, torture by smugglers, and drowning in the Mediterranean when boats sink. Nonetheless, thousands remain undeterred.

Key International Actors
In July, Qatar suddenly withdrew its 450 troops guarding the Eritrea-Djibouti border. The two countries had fought a two-day battle inside Djibouti in 2008, and the UN Security Council concluded that Eritrea was the aggressor. The two ultimately agreed to have Qatar mediate the dispute and patrol the border. The only result of the mediation was that Eritrea released four prisoners-of-war in 2016, after eight years of captivity; Djibouti claims Eritrea holds a dozen more. At Djibouti’s request, the AU proposed sending a fact-finding mission to the border but Eritrea did not respond. By year’s end the border remained quiet.

Relations with Ethiopia remain tense but no major incidents occurred in 2017. The two nations fought a bloody border war in 1998-2000, and Ethiopia occupies territory identified by an international boundary commission as Eritrean, including the town of Badme. President Isaias uses the “no-war, no-peace” situation with Ethiopia to continue his repressive domestic policies, including protracted national service.

The UN Security Council retained arms embargo against Eritrea until at least April 2018 after receiving a report from its Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea. Eritrea again refused to cooperate with the group in 2017. The group reported it had no evidence Eritrea was sending arms to Al-Shabab in Somalia, but Eritrea continued to arm and train anti-Ethiopia and anti-Djibouti militias in violation of the UN embargo.

Eritrea receives substantial income from foreign companies mining gold, copper, zinc, and nickel in the country. Government has 40 percent ownership in these companies. Two mines, SFECO Group’s Zara Mining Share Company and Sichuan Road & Bridge Mining Investment are Chinese majority-owned; another, at Bisha, is majority-owned by Canada’s Nevsun Mining.

All are required by the government to use government-owned construction firms for infrastructure development, thereby indirectly profiting from national service conscript labor. In November, a Canadian appellate court allowed a suit against Nevsun by former national service conscripts complaining of forced labor at Bisha to proceed

Absent evidence that Eritrea had implemented democratic reforms and ended its human rights abuses, the European Parliament in July once again denounced as unwarranted further disbursements from the European Union’s 2015 €200 (US$238) million aid package, awarded to try to stem migration from Eritrea.
Zmeselo wrote:
29 Dec 2019, 11:40


Qatar
Events of 2017


https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2018/c ... ters/qatar

Qatar faced a diplomatic crisis in 2017, as some of its neighbors cut diplomatic ties with it over its alleged support of terrorism and its closeness with Iran—claims that Qatar rejects.

The move in early June by Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates—and their subsequent issuance with Egypt of a list of 13 demands for ending the crisis, which Qatar rejected—isolated the Gulf state and precipitated serious human rights violations of individuals living in Qatar, infringing on their right to free expression, separating families, and interrupting medical care and education. At time of writing, travel to and from Qatar was restricted, and its border with Saudi Arabia remained closed.

Gulf Crisis

On June 5, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the UAE cut diplomatic relations with Qatar over its alleged support of terrorism and its closeness with Iran and ordered the expulsion of Qatari citizens and the return of their citizens from Qatar within 14 days.

On June 23, the three countries and Egypt issued a list of 13 demands for ending the crisis that included shutting down Al Jazeera and other media they claim are Qatar- funded; downgrading diplomatic ties with Iran; severing ties with “terrorist organizations,” including the Muslim Brotherhood, and expelling people associated with such organizations from Qatar; and paying reparations to other Gulf countries for “loss of life” and “other financial losses” resulting from Qatar’s policies.

Qatar rejected the demands.

Residency Reforms

On August 3, 2017, the Qatari cabinet approved a draft law that will allow permanent residence for children of Qatari women married to non-Qataris, as well as expatriates who “provide outstanding services to Qatar.”

Qatar does not allow dual nationality and discriminates against women by not allowing them to pass nationality to their children on the same basis as men. Qatar allows men to pass citizenship to their children, whereas children of Qatari women and non-citizen men can only apply for citizenship under narrow conditions.

Under the 2005 law on acquisition of Qatari nationality, people who have lived in Qatar for more than 25 years may apply for nationality, with priority for those with Qatari mothers, under specific conditions. However, the government has not consistently approved such applications. If enacted, the draft law would help people whose mothers are Qatari nationals to secure resident status in Qatar even if they do not have valid passports from another country. However, it still falls short of granting women the same rights as Qatari men to pass citizenship to their children.

The Qatari draft law’s provision of permanent residence to migrants who “provide outstanding services to Qatar” also could help Emirati, Egyptian, Bahraini, and Saudi nationals affected by the diplomatic crisis. Many have chosen to remain in Qatar for family or work reasons or because they fear persecution in their home countries.

Under the law, the Interior Ministry is to establish a committee to review requests for permanent residency IDs. But it was not clear at time of writing whether the committee would grant residency to those who fear persecution or harm in their countries of origin. Qatar does not have a law on asylum and has not ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention.

Migrant Domestic Workers

On August 22, 2017, the emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, ratified Law No.15 on service workers in the home. The cabinet adopted the law in February, which will grant labor protections for the first time to Qatar’s 173,742 domestic workers. The new law guarantees domestic workers a maximum 10-hour workday, a weekly rest day, three weeks of annual leave, an end-of-service payment of at least three weeks per year, and healthcare benefits.

However, the new law is still weaker than the Labor Law and does not fully conform to the International Labour Organization (ILO) Domestic Workers Convention, the global treaty on domestic workers’ rights. The new law establishes fines for violations, but lacks provisions for enforcement, such as workplace inspections, including in homes where domestic workers are employed. The law does not state how workers can claim their rights if they have been breached except in cases of compensation for work injuries. Workers in Qatar are not allowed to form a union or entitled to a minimum wage established by law.

Construction Workers

Qatar has a migrant labor force of nearly 2 million people, who comprise approximately 95 percent of its total labor force. Approximately 40 percent, or 800,000, of these workers are employed in construction. Current heat protection regulations for most workers in Qatar only prohibit outdoor work from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. from June 15 to August 31. But climate data shows that weather conditions in Qatar outside those hours and dates frequently reach levels that can result in potentially fatal heat-related illnesses without rest.

In 2013, health authorities reported 520 deaths of workers of whom 385, or 74 percent, died from unexplained causes. Qatari public health officials have not responded to requests for information about the overall number and causes of deaths of migrant workers since 2012.

A 2014 report that the Qatari government commissioned from the international law firm DLA Piper noted that the number of worker deaths in Qatar attributed to cardiac arrest, a general term that does not specify cause of death, was “seemingly high.” Authorities have failed to implement two of the report’s key recommendations: reforming its laws to allow autopsies or post-mortem examinations in cases of “unexpected or sudden deaths” and commissioning an independent study into the seemingly high number of deaths vaguely attributed to cardiac arrest.

On October 26, the International Trade Union Confederation announced Qatar’s agreement to extensive reforms of the current kafala (sponsorship) system, to institute a nondiscriminatory minimum wage, to improve payment of wages, to end document confiscation, to enhance labor inspections and occupational safety and health systems including by developing a heat mitigation strategy, to refine the contractual system to improve labor recruitment procedures, and to step up efforts to prevent forced labor.

These measures would be pathbreaking for Gulf countries where migrants make up most of the labor force, but the announcement gives little detail on how laws will be amended, how the changes will be carried out, or the timeframe for their implementation.

Women’s Rights, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity

Qatar’s Law No. 22 of 2006 on Family and Personal Status continues to discriminate against women. Under article 36, a marriage contract is valid when a woman’s male guardian concludes the contract and two male witnesses are present. Article 58 states that it is a wife’s responsibility to look after the household and to obey her husband.

Other than article 57 of the family law forbidding husbands from hurting their wives physically or morally, and general provisions on assault, the penal code does not criminalize domestic violence or marital rape.

Qatar’s penal code punishes “sodomy” with one to three years in prison. Muslims convicted of zina (sex outside of marriage) can be sentenced to flogging (if unmarried) or the death penalty (if married). Non-Muslims can be sentenced to imprisonment.

Key International Actors

Qatar was a member of the Saudi-led coalition that began a military campaign in Yemen in March 2015 but Qatar withdrew its forces from the operation in June 2017. The coalition has conducted thousands of airstrikes in Yemen, including scores that appear to violate the laws of war, some of which may be war crimes. However, coalition members, including Qatar, have provided insufficient or no information about the role that particular countries’ forces are playing in alleged unlawful attacks.

Qatar purchased at least US$18 billion in weapons during 2017, of which at least $12 billion was from the United States. In June, reacting to the isolation of Qatar by neighboring states, Turkey's parliament fast-tracked the approval of an April 2016 agreement with Qatar on the implementation of Turkish troops' deployment to a military base in Qatar, and the two countries began carrying out joint military exercises.

Tog Wajale
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Posts: 3564
Joined: 23 Dec 2017, 07:23

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Tog Wajale » 29 Dec 2019, 16:52

Qomal Agga*me This Is Old Recycled Cooked Woyane T.P.L.F. Stories.

pastlast
Member
Posts: 1782
Joined: 19 May 2019, 18:02

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by pastlast » 29 Dec 2019, 19:57

Tog Wajale wrote:
29 Dec 2019, 16:52
Qomal Agga*me This Is Old Recycled Cooked Woyane T.P.L.F. Stories.
Isayas Afwrki is a WOYANE Agent in PFDJ!










Abe Abraham
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Posts: 6847
Joined: 05 Jun 2013, 13:00

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Abe Abraham » 29 Dec 2019, 20:03



ASSWASH JOHAR!! We know you very well. Don't hide your true identity. You are making it more difficult for your people through your behaviour. Axum mosque !! :lol: :lol: :lol:


Awash
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Posts: 27548
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 29 Dec 2019, 21:13

Abe Abraham wrote:
29 Dec 2019, 20:03
ASSWASH JOHAR!! We know you very well. Don't hide your true identity. You are making it more difficult for your people through your behaviour. Axum mosque !! :lol: :lol: :lol:
Aba Abraham TiTu,
"የቸገረው እርጉዝ ያገባል" says a Amhara proverb.
Stop trying to project your own Agame complex onto others. Your tyrant is devouring Eritreans becouse of that complex.

Zmeselo
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Posts: 18617
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Zmeselo » 29 Dec 2019, 22:31













Last edited by Zmeselo on 29 Dec 2019, 23:11, edited 1 time in total.

Temt
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Posts: 2255
Joined: 04 Jun 2013, 22:23

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Temt » 29 Dec 2019, 22:54

Thanks Zmeselo. As usual very informative posts unlike the Hasadat Weyane cadres garbage in garbage out.

Zmeselo
Senior Member
Posts: 18617
Joined: 30 Jul 2010, 20:43

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Zmeselo » 29 Dec 2019, 23:15

Temt wrote:
29 Dec 2019, 22:54
Thanks Zmeselo. As usual very informative posts unlike the Hasadat Weyane cadres garbage in garbage out.
You're welcome, brother.

It's amazing & bizarre, that countries who're ruled by Royal houses dare criticize other countries for lack of freedom & democracy, through their outlets (BBC, Al Jazeera etc.)

Awash
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Posts: 27548
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 29 Dec 2019, 23:31


Awash
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Posts: 27548
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 29 Dec 2019, 23:39

The Most Repressive State You May Have Never Heard Of

by Bryan Bowman. August 2, 2019

Eritrea has faced increasing international criticism after last year's release of a UN report accusing the government of President Isaias Afwerki of crimes against humanity. Photo: AFP

With more than 25 million people forcibly displaced from their countries by the end of 2018, the world currently faces an unprecedented refugee crisis. Among the countries with the highest rates of displacement are Syria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Afghanistan – all of which are riven by war and instability. 

Also on this list, however, is Eritrea. In contrast, the small East African nation has been mostly at peace since it won its independence struggle against neighboring Ethiopia in the early 1990s...

...The fate of its citizens are dictated by the whims of the regime – headed by independence leader turned dictator Isais Afwerki. All Eritreans are subject to conscription into the military and can be compelled into forced labor that the U.N. says “effectively abuses, exploits and enslaves them for years.”

Those who step out of line can be detained indefinitely under shocking conditions. Others are killed. There are no courts to hear their appeals...


https://theglobepost.com/2019/08/02/mar ... gsHgKmgs40

Awash
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Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 30 Dec 2019, 00:14


Awash
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Re: Eritrea Accuses Al Jazeera For Bias Reporting lol

Post by Awash » 30 Dec 2019, 02:36

Release the prisoners

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