Ethiopian News, Current Affairs and Opinion Forum
Sadacha Macca
Senior Member
Posts: 10187
Joined: 22 Feb 2014, 16:46

kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by Sadacha Macca » 16 Oct 2019, 21:54

Tigrayan + Kebessa relations with Tewodros:

''In the course of the 1860's, Tewodros was continually defied in Tigray and the Kebessa-despite his description of the na'ib of Massawa as his ''vassal,''-and the northern region was a patchwork of garrison-based military occupation and zones of active hostility. One of Tewodros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s was at Keren, comprimising villainous looking scoundrels, according to Blance, evidence that Tewodros 'was not very particular as to whom he selected for such distant outposts.
In 1866, as Tewodros' reign entered its finaly bloody phase, the north was in turmoil, with the effects of famine across Tigray and the Kebessa exacerbated by the armed incursions of Gobaze (the future Tekle Giorgis) of Lasta, who likewise sought to impose order in the north, and whose troops clashed with those of Tewodros in Akele Guzay.
Detailed evidence is sometimes lacking, but it seems clear that food shortages drove a great deal of the violence of this period, as armies and beleaguered farming communities alike sought to secure new agricultural supplies or protect what they already had. It is clear, moreover, that the culture of violent confrontation which characterized Ethiopian politics in the 19th century had a dramatic impact on the Eritrean region; but the troubled frontier in turn served to destabilize Habesha politics and heighten levels of violent insecurity south of the Mereb river.

With the fall of Tewodros and the rise to pre-eminence of Yohannes, the history of the northern zone entered a new phase, with the northward shift in the balance of power to Tigray having major implications for politics north of the Mereb.
Propagandist rhetoric for Dejjazmach Kassa in 1869 had it that he was ruled from 'Tekezze... to Massawa... all the land is pacified and well provided for'; but the reality was that the convulsions which followed Tewodros's death rendered Yohannes' power base even in Tigray unstable.
Yet his gaze was indeed fixed on the Eritrean frontier. From the early 1870s, his chief tormentor was Egypt, which not only sought 'to prevent me from having any outlet on the red sea,' but actively pushed the frontier southward and challenged his jurisdiction at every opportunity.
Like Tewodros before him, Yohannes interpreted the struggle unfolding before him in religious terms, perceiving a single pan-Islamic threat across a broad arc of territory from Massawa, through Keren and Kassala, to the modern Ethiopian-Egyptian borderland.''



Frontiers of Violence in North-East Africa: Genealogies of Conflict Since C.1800
By Richard J. Reid, pages 72-74]

kerenite
Member
Posts: 2297
Joined: 16 Nov 2013, 13:15

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by kerenite » 17 Oct 2019, 12:54

Sadacha Macca wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 21:54
Tigrayan + Kebessa relations with Tewodros:

''In the course of the 1860's, Tewodros was continually defied in Tigray and the Kebessa-despite his description of the na'ib of Massawa as his ''vassal,''-and the northern region was a patchwork of garrison-based military occupation and zones of active hostility. One of Tewodros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s was at Keren, comprimising villainous looking scoundrels, according to Blance, evidence that Tewodros 'was not very particular as to whom he selected for such distant outposts.
In 1866, as Tewodros' reign entered its finaly bloody phase, the north was in turmoil, with the effects of famine across Tigray and the Kebessa exacerbated by the armed incursions of Gobaze (the future Tekle Giorgis) of Lasta, who likewise sought to impose order in the north, and whose troops clashed with those of Tewodros in Akele Guzay.
Detailed evidence is sometimes lacking, but it seems clear that food shortages drove a great deal of the violence of this period, as armies and beleaguered farming communities alike sought to secure new agricultural supplies or protect what they already had. It is clear, moreover, that the culture of violent confrontation which characterized Ethiopian politics in the 19th century had a dramatic impact on the Eritrean region; but the troubled frontier in turn served to destabilize Habesha politics and heighten levels of violent insecurity south of the Mereb river.

With the fall of Tewodros and the rise to pre-eminence of Yohannes, the history of the northern zone entered a new phase, with the northward shift in the balance of power to Tigray having major implications for politics north of the Mereb.
Propagandist rhetoric for Dejjazmach Kassa in 1869 had it that he was ruled from 'Tekezze... to Massawa... all the land is pacified and well provided for'; but the reality was that the convulsions which followed Tewodros's death rendered Yohannes' power base even in Tigray unstable.
Yet his gaze was indeed fixed on the Eritrean frontier. From the early 1870s, his chief tormentor was Egypt, which not only sought 'to prevent me from having any outlet on the red sea,' but actively pushed the frontier southward and challenged his jurisdiction at every opportunity.
Like Tewodros before him, Yohannes interpreted the struggle unfolding before him in religious terms, perceiving a single pan-Islamic threat across a broad arc of territory from Massawa, through Keren and Kassala, to the modern Ethiopian-Egyptian borderland.''



Frontiers of Violence in North-East Africa: Genealogies of Conflict Since C.1800
By Richard J. Reid, pages 72-74]
Tena yistilign,

With all due respect to you but thanks for the laugh.

I found below statement, quoting your source hilarious:

"One of tedros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s [1869s lol] was at keren"

In the 1869s tedros was long dead unless he was ruling from his grave. Tedros died in the year 1868.

Rewriting history yibalal. Tedros was just a simple warlord, his militias never set foot... forget lowland eritrea not even in kebessa eritrea. Garrison? Thanks for the laugh. Being a warlord, He was threatening warlords in kebessa whom he assigned to pay tribute.

I won't be surprised if I read that the red sea was under his control as well.

Hey! One never knows, a history re-writer may pop up here to tell us that abyssinia owned the red sea as well.

Prove me here, did abyssinia own a boat (forget navy) during the consecutive rules of tedros or yohannes or menilik? Of course NOT. The only time when abyssinia became familiar with the red sea was during sillassie's period and that's when he forcefully annexed eritrea.

Zack
Senior Member
Posts: 14626
Joined: 17 Feb 2013, 08:24

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by Zack » 17 Oct 2019, 13:23

I believe king yohannes ruled parts of Eritrean territories two before he was killed. Kerenite correct me if I am wrong but during the Ethiopia Egypt war wasn't Ethiopia controlling parts of the sea or were they only in place in some territories inside what is now Eritrea. We do know Ethiopia and Eritrea were never one country only 2600years ago during axum. But were always opposing factors and adveseries to one another indeed.


Dr Zackovich

kerenite
Member
Posts: 2297
Joined: 16 Nov 2013, 13:15

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by kerenite » 17 Oct 2019, 13:58

Zack wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 13:23
I believe king yohannes ruled parts of Eritrean territories two before he was killed. Kerenite correct me if I am wrong but during the Ethiopia Egypt war wasn't Ethiopia controlling parts of the sea or were they only in place in some territories inside what is now Eritrea. We do know Ethiopia and Eritrea were never one country only 2600years ago during axum. But were always opposing factors and adveseries to one another indeed.


Dr Zackovich
Good evening zack,

Yohannes was just another warlord, his militias never set foot further from GindA in Eritrea. He along with his alula is perceived in Eritrea by the genuine eritreans (forget his offspring here who pose as eritreans) as villain, looter and murderer of our kunama and nara ethnic groups.

I don't want to comment on his atrocities on the ethio muslims while I ain't a muslim caliph or a muslim pope lest his offspring here call me jihadist. Lol

Degnet
Senior Member+
Posts: 23430
Joined: 16 Feb 2013, 11:48

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by Degnet » 17 Oct 2019, 14:33

kerenite wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 13:58
Zack wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 13:23
I believe king yohannes ruled parts of Eritrean territories two before he was killed. Kerenite correct me if I am wrong but during the Ethiopia Egypt war wasn't Ethiopia controlling parts of the sea or were they only in place in some territories inside what is now Eritrea. We do know Ethiopia and Eritrea were never one country only 2600years ago during axum. But were always opposing factors and adveseries to one another indeed.


Dr Zackovich
Good evening zack,

Yohannes was just another warlord, his militias never set foot further from GindA in Eritrea. He along with his alula is perceived in Eritrea by the genuine eritreans (forget his offspring here who pose as eritreans) as villain, looter and murderer of our kunama and nara ethnic groups.

I don't want to comment on his atrocities on the ethio muslims while I ain't a muslim caliph or a muslim pope lest his offspring here call me jihadist. Lol
Zion will rise again,Zion is for ever.White/Black.

Sadacha Macca
Senior Member
Posts: 10187
Joined: 22 Feb 2014, 16:46

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by Sadacha Macca » 17 Oct 2019, 14:36

kerenite wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 12:54
Sadacha Macca wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 21:54
Tigrayan + Kebessa relations with Tewodros:

''In the course of the 1860's, Tewodros was continually defied in Tigray and the Kebessa-despite his description of the na'ib of Massawa as his ''vassal,''-and the northern region was a patchwork of garrison-based military occupation and zones of active hostility. One of Tewodros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s was at Keren, comprimising villainous looking scoundrels, according to Blance, evidence that Tewodros 'was not very particular as to whom he selected for such distant outposts.
In 1866, as Tewodros' reign entered its finaly bloody phase, the north was in turmoil, with the effects of famine across Tigray and the Kebessa exacerbated by the armed incursions of Gobaze (the future Tekle Giorgis) of Lasta, who likewise sought to impose order in the north, and whose troops clashed with those of Tewodros in Akele Guzay.
Detailed evidence is sometimes lacking, but it seems clear that food shortages drove a great deal of the violence of this period, as armies and beleaguered farming communities alike sought to secure new agricultural supplies or protect what they already had. It is clear, moreover, that the culture of violent confrontation which characterized Ethiopian politics in the 19th century had a dramatic impact on the Eritrean region; but the troubled frontier in turn served to destabilize Habesha politics and heighten levels of violent insecurity south of the Mereb river.

With the fall of Tewodros and the rise to pre-eminence of Yohannes, the history of the northern zone entered a new phase, with the northward shift in the balance of power to Tigray having major implications for politics north of the Mereb.
Propagandist rhetoric for Dejjazmach Kassa in 1869 had it that he was ruled from 'Tekezze... to Massawa... all the land is pacified and well provided for'; but the reality was that the convulsions which followed Tewodros's death rendered Yohannes' power base even in Tigray unstable.
Yet his gaze was indeed fixed on the Eritrean frontier. From the early 1870s, his chief tormentor was Egypt, which not only sought 'to prevent me from having any outlet on the red sea,' but actively pushed the frontier southward and challenged his jurisdiction at every opportunity.
Like Tewodros before him, Yohannes interpreted the struggle unfolding before him in religious terms, perceiving a single pan-Islamic threat across a broad arc of territory from Massawa, through Keren and Kassala, to the modern Ethiopian-Egyptian borderland.''



Frontiers of Violence in North-East Africa: Genealogies of Conflict Since C.1800
By Richard J. Reid, pages 72-74]
Tena yistilign,

With all due respect to you but thanks for the laugh.

I found below statement, quoting your source hilarious:

"One of tedros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s [1869s lol] was at keren"

In the 1869s tedros was long dead unless he was ruling from his grave. Tedros died in the year 1868.

Rewriting history yibalal. Tedros was just a simple warlord, his militias never set foot... forget lowland eritrea not even in kebessa eritrea. Garrison? Thanks for the laugh. Being a warlord, He was threatening warlords in kebessa whom he assigned to pay tribute.

I won't be surprised if I read that the red sea was under his control as well.

Hey! One never knows, a history re-writer may pop up here to tell us that abyssinia owned the red sea as well.

Prove me here, did abyssinia own a boat (forget navy) during the consecutive rules of tedros or yohannes or menilik? Of course NOT. The only time when abyssinia became familiar with the red sea was during sillassie's period and that's when he forcefully annexed eritrea.



The date was supposed to say\be the 1860s* not 1869s.
Besides that, what was wrong with it, where are your references kind sir?

Degnet
Senior Member+
Posts: 23430
Joined: 16 Feb 2013, 11:48

Re: kebessa and tigray in time of tewodros

Post by Degnet » 17 Oct 2019, 14:42

Sadacha Macca wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 14:36
kerenite wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 12:54
Sadacha Macca wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 21:54
Tigrayan + Kebessa relations with Tewodros:

''In the course of the 1860's, Tewodros was continually defied in Tigray and the Kebessa-despite his description of the na'ib of Massawa as his ''vassal,''-and the northern region was a patchwork of garrison-based military occupation and zones of active hostility. One of Tewodros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s was at Keren, comprimising villainous looking scoundrels, according to Blance, evidence that Tewodros 'was not very particular as to whom he selected for such distant outposts.
In 1866, as Tewodros' reign entered its finaly bloody phase, the north was in turmoil, with the effects of famine across Tigray and the Kebessa exacerbated by the armed incursions of Gobaze (the future Tekle Giorgis) of Lasta, who likewise sought to impose order in the north, and whose troops clashed with those of Tewodros in Akele Guzay.
Detailed evidence is sometimes lacking, but it seems clear that food shortages drove a great deal of the violence of this period, as armies and beleaguered farming communities alike sought to secure new agricultural supplies or protect what they already had. It is clear, moreover, that the culture of violent confrontation which characterized Ethiopian politics in the 19th century had a dramatic impact on the Eritrean region; but the troubled frontier in turn served to destabilize Habesha politics and heighten levels of violent insecurity south of the Mereb river.

With the fall of Tewodros and the rise to pre-eminence of Yohannes, the history of the northern zone entered a new phase, with the northward shift in the balance of power to Tigray having major implications for politics north of the Mereb.
Propagandist rhetoric for Dejjazmach Kassa in 1869 had it that he was ruled from 'Tekezze... to Massawa... all the land is pacified and well provided for'; but the reality was that the convulsions which followed Tewodros's death rendered Yohannes' power base even in Tigray unstable.
Yet his gaze was indeed fixed on the Eritrean frontier. From the early 1870s, his chief tormentor was Egypt, which not only sought 'to prevent me from having any outlet on the red sea,' but actively pushed the frontier southward and challenged his jurisdiction at every opportunity.
Like Tewodros before him, Yohannes interpreted the struggle unfolding before him in religious terms, perceiving a single pan-Islamic threat across a broad arc of territory from Massawa, through Keren and Kassala, to the modern Ethiopian-Egyptian borderland.''



Frontiers of Violence in North-East Africa: Genealogies of Conflict Since C.1800
By Richard J. Reid, pages 72-74]
Tena yistilign,

With all due respect to you but thanks for the laugh.

I found below statement, quoting your source hilarious:

"One of tedros' key garrisons in the north in the mid 1869s [1869s lol] was at keren"

In the 1869s tedros was long dead unless he was ruling from his grave. Tedros died in the year 1868.

Rewriting history yibalal. Tedros was just a simple warlord, his militias never set foot... forget lowland eritrea not even in kebessa eritrea. Garrison? Thanks for the laugh. Being a warlord, He was threatening warlords in kebessa whom he assigned to pay tribute.

I won't be surprised if I read that the red sea was under his control as well.

Hey! One never knows, a history re-writer may pop up here to tell us that abyssinia owned the red sea as well.

Prove me here, did abyssinia own a boat (forget navy) during the consecutive rules of tedros or yohannes or menilik? Of course NOT. The only time when abyssinia became familiar with the red sea was during sillassie's period and that's when he forcefully annexed eritrea.



The date was supposed to say\be the 1860s* not 1869s.
Besides that, what was wrong with it, where are your references kind sir?
It is true,he died in 1868,the famous American writer was travelling at that time and on his way to Jerusalem,he met the invading English in Cairo on their way to Ethiopia,give me his name,the most famous American/Misisipi boat capitain.I got his name,Mark Twain.

Post Reply