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Awash
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Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 04:50


Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Zmeselo » 12 Aug 2019, 06:01

Talk about YOUR mental enslavedness instead, kunta.

Awash
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 09:05

Eritrea high schools are repressed

Aug 11, 2019  

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the center of the government’s efforts to control the population, a human rights organization charged on Friday.

In a new report, “They Are Making us Into Slaves, Not Educating Us: How indefinite conscription restricts young people’s rights, access to education,” Human Rights Watch alleged that the education system subjects both students and teachers to forced labor and physical abuse, causing many to flee the country.

The report says the Eritrean government forcibly channels thousands of young people, some still children, each year into military training even before they finish their schooling.

“Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the heart of its repressive system of control over its population,” said Laetitia Bader, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Now that peace with Ethiopia is restored, reforms on human rights, starting with the rights and freedom of the country’s youth, need to follow.”

The report claims that instead of developing a pool of committed, well-trained secondary school teachers, the government conscripts teachers for indefinite service, giving them no choice about whether, what, or where to teach.

Awash
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 10:34

Zmeselo wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 06:01
Talk about YOUR mental enslavedness instead, kunta.
Look who's talking, deqi medhin berad.

YAY
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by YAY » 12 Aug 2019, 11:29

Dear Awash: Do you know where Eritrea is?
Do you know where Eritrea is? GMU Students learn about development during two-week visit to isolated country

By Angela Woolsey/Fairfax County Times Aug 9, 2019


George Mason University School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution students David Aratuo, Gbenga Dasylva, and Marian Dualle and George Washington University student Rose Essiem talk to Eritrean Director of Investments Dr. Woldai Futur on a visit to Asmara, Eritrea.
PHOTO BY CAROL PINEAU


There are two competing versions of Eritrea, a small country caught between Sudan and Ethiopia in the Horn of Africa.

One version has earned the moniker “Africa’s North Korea”
due to its one-party system of government that organizations from the CIA to the Human Rights Watch organization have labeled as repressive, pointing to the nation’s isolation from the world stage, lack of elections, use of a national service conscription program and reported detentions of journalists and political critics as evidence.

A special rapporteur appointed to monitor Eritrea by the United Nations Human Rights Council reported in June 2018 that the “human rights situation on the ground remains grim, with no meaningful progress to address specific human rights violations found,” leading more than 300,000 individuals to seek refugee or asylum status in neighboring countries and Europe.

Reporters Without Borders ranks Eritrea 178th out of 180 countries in its 2019 World Press Freedom Index, above only North Korea and Turkmenistan. The international nonprofit says 11 journalists have been imprisoned by Eritrea for their work since 2001, though the most recent confirmed instances happened in February 2011.

However, there is also the Eritrea that George Mason University students say they encountered during a two-week study abroad trip to the country organized by Mason’s School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution.

GMU’s “Eritrea: Challenging Narratives of Development in Post Conflict Settings” program was the first study abroad trip to Eritrea undertaken by any university, according to journalist Carol Pineau, who accompanied students along with GMU associate professor of conflict analysis and resolution Dr. Solon Simmons.

Far from an unstable, authoritarian nightmare, the 11 Mason students who visited Eritrea from June 9 to 22 say they found a more complex country than its stereotypical portrayal whose self-reliant approach to post-conflict development could hold valuable lessons for other African nations.

“Post-conflict development, this is history in the making,” Pineau said. “This is a time to see it as it’s happening.”

Established as an autonomous nation in 1991 after a 30-year war for independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea is home to an estimated 3.5 million people, according to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs’ 2019 World Population Prospects data.

Led by President Isaias Afwerki since 1993, when voters approved an independence referendum, Eritrea was largely isolated from the rest of the world during a 20-year conflict with Ethiopia that began in 1998 and officially ended in July 2018 with the signing of a peace agreement.

Eritrean and Ethiopian leaders reopened their shared border for travel and trade in September 2018, and the U.N. Security Council unanimously voted in November to lift sanctions that had been imposed on Eritrea in 2009 in response to allegations that it armed, trained, and equipped Islamic militants in Somalia.

The sanctions included an arms embargo, asset freeze, and travel ban, though Eritrea denied the allegations as a fabrication by the U.S., which is an ally of Ethiopia, according to the BBC.

Pineau covered Eritrea for CNN in 1999 and 2000 during the height of its war with Ethiopia. She was planning a film and book project on development in Eritrea when she came to the GMU School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution as an affiliate.

When the school suggested taking students to help with her project, Pineau quickly agreed and collaborated with SCAR Center for Narrative and Conflict Resolution founder and professor Dr. Sara Cobb to design a study abroad program.

Pineau says the course gave students a unique opportunity to observe a country that is not only in the process of development, but has opted for an almost entirely local and state-led approach instead of depending on foreign aid or intervention.

“This is a country that owns its own development,” Pineau said. “There’s no one else in Africa that’s like that, and what is amazing is that, with 20 years of isolation, conflict, nine years of sanctions, no U.S. AID, no World Bank, and yet they are meeting the [U.N.] Sustainable Development Goals…That’s something to learn from, and that was really the objective of the trip.”

Developed in 2012 and made effective in 2016, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals set targets for combating global issues, such as climate change, poverty, and inequality, by 2030.

Pineau wanted to give students enrolled in the study abroad program an all-encompassing view of Eritrea.

In addition to talking to government leaders in the country’s capital of Asmara, participants visited health clinics, schools, farms, and economic development project sites. They met with everyone from ministers and former revolutionaries to writers, farmers, youth groups, and women’s groups.

For Gbenga Dasylva, a doctoral student in the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution who is studying peace building and sustainable development, one of the most memorable parts of the trip was the chance to observe Martyr’s Day on June 20, which commemorates the people who died during Eritrea’s 30-year struggle for independence from Ethiopia.

As part of the Martyr’s Day celebrations, students listened to speeches, joined a candlelight procession, and watched as residents decorated a local graveyard. They also visited a “Tank Graveyard” where many of the military vehicles used during the war still stand.

Every family in Eritrea knows someone who died during the conflict, according to Pineau.

Dasylva says Martyr’s Day plays a central role in Eritrea’s national identity, which emphasizes the individual’s responsibility to the collective in honor of the sacrifices made to establish the country.

Eritrea conscripts all adults into national service, a commitment that was originally mandatory for 18 months but has been indefinite since the border war with Ethiopia broke out in 1998, but the government also provides tuition-free education from first grade through college.

Dasylva argues that some of the criticism of Eritrea reflects ideological differences between Africa and the West.

“The reason why I feel Eritrea is portrayed in the negative is because of the naivety of the Western understanding about the African culture,” Dasylva said. “…The country that has spent so much in sending you to school from the first grade through to the university, and you are not asked to pay a dime, and all the country’s asking is give back to your country.”

Dasylva’s perspective on Eritrea is shaped by his experience growing up in Nigeria.

The International Monetary Fund ranked Nigeria’s economy as the largest in Africa in its 2018 World Economic Outlook report, and the country has held regular elections since transitioning from military to civilian rule in 1999.

Yet, Dasylva says people in his homeland still struggle with poverty, limited infrastructure, and other needs even as the country receives billions of dollars in foreign investment from organizations like the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

“I can boldly tell you that the development steps and processes that I have seen in Eritrea, Nigeria is not close,” Dasylva said. “Nigeria, with so much money and multimillionaires and private jets, is not close. If you cannot guarantee the basic human needs to an average citizen in your country, you have nothing to boast about when it comes to development.”

Fellow student Friderike Butler observes in a report for the Eyewitness Eritrea project that the GMU School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution is putting together to document the study abroad trip that Eritrea found “a special place” in her heart even as “uncomfortable facts” remain a challenge to reconcile with the country’s positive development efforts.

“The country and its people defy many stereotypes of developing poor nations,” Butler, who describes herself as a German American entrepreneur, notes. “…Stories brim of promising opportunities, hopeful dreams, utopian concepts, restrictions of individual freedom, and the potential to solve global challenges.”

Mason could potentially repeat the study abroad trip to Eritrea next year, and Pineau praised the university’s willingness to take a chance on a program that would not have been possible even a year ago.

“I think that just speaks volumes about how innovative they are,” Pineau said. “…The students themselves were just so open and so willing to learn and not come with preconceived notions, but to come and say, we want to hear about it. We want to learn, and that was really wonderful.”
http://www.fairfaxtimes.com/articles/do ... user-share

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 09:05
Eritrea high schools are repressed

Aug 11, 2019  

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the center of the government’s efforts to control the population, a human rights organization charged on Friday.

In a new report, “They Are Making us Into Slaves, Not Educating Us: How indefinite conscription restricts young people’s rights, access to education,” Human Rights Watch alleged that the education system subjects both students and teachers to forced labor and physical abuse, causing many to flee the country.

The report says the Eritrean government forcibly channels thousands of young people, some still children, each year into military training even before they finish their schooling.

“Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the heart of its repressive system of control over its population,” said Laetitia Bader, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Now that peace with Ethiopia is restored, reforms on human rights, starting with the rights and freedom of the country’s youth, need to follow.”

The report claims that instead of developing a pool of committed, well-trained secondary school teachers, the government conscripts teachers for indefinite service, giving them no choice about whether, what, or where to teach.
Last edited by YAY on 12 Aug 2019, 12:01, edited 9 times in total.

Degnet
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Degnet » 12 Aug 2019, 11:35

YAY wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 11:29
Dear Awash: Do you know where Eritrea is?

Do you know where Eritrea is? GMU Students learn about development during two-week visit to isolated country

By Angela Woolsey/Fairfax County Times Aug 9, 2019 0

Eritrea

George Mason University School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution students David Aratuo, Gbenga Dasylva, and Marian Dualle and George Washington University student Rose Essiem talk to Eritrean Director of Investments Dr. Woldai Futur on a visit to Asmara, Eritrea.
PHOTO BY CAROL PINEAU

There are two competing versions of Eritrea, a small country caught between Sudan and Ethiopia in the Horn of Africa.

One version has earned the moniker “Africa’s North Korea” due to its one-party system of government that organizations from the CIA to the Human Rights Watch organization have labeled as repressive, pointing to the nation’s isolation from the world stage, lack of elections, use of a national service conscription program and reported detentions of journalists and political critics as evidence.

A special rapporteur appointed to monitor Eritrea by the United Nations Human Rights Council reported in June 2018 that the “human rights situation on the ground remains grim, with no meaningful progress to address specific human rights violations found,” leading more than 300,000 individuals to seek refugee or asylum status in neighboring countries and Europe.

Reporters Without Borders ranks Eritrea 178th out of 180 countries in its 2019 World Press Freedom Index, above only North Korea and Turkmenistan. The international nonprofit says 11 journalists have been imprisoned by Eritrea for their work since 2001, though the most recent confirmed instances happened in February 2011.

However, there is also the Eritrea that George Mason University students say they encountered during a two-week study abroad trip to the country organized by Mason’s School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution.

GMU’s “Eritrea: Challenging Narratives of Development in Post Conflict Settings” program was the first study abroad trip to Eritrea undertaken by any university, according to journalist Carol Pineau, who accompanied students along with GMU associate professor of conflict analysis and resolution Dr. Solon Simmons.

Far from an unstable, authoritarian nightmare, the 11 Mason students who visited Eritrea from June 9 to 22 say they found a more complex country than its stereotypical portrayal whose self-reliant approach to post-conflict development could hold valuable lessons for other African nations.

“Post-conflict development, this is history in the making,” Pineau said. “This is a time to see it as it’s happening.”

Established as an autonomous nation in 1991 after a 30-year war for independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea is home to an estimated 3.5 million people, according to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs’ 2019 World Population Prospects data.

Led by President Isaias Afwerki since 1993, when voters approved an independence referendum, Eritrea was largely isolated from the rest of the world during a 20-year conflict with Ethiopia that began in 1998 and officially ended in July 2018 with the signing of a peace agreement.

Eritrean and Ethiopian leaders reopened their shared border for travel and trade in September 2018, and the U.N. Security Council unanimously voted in November to lift sanctions that had been imposed on Eritrea in 2009 in response to allegations that it armed, trained, and equipped Islamic militants in Somalia.

The sanctions included an arms embargo, asset freeze, and travel ban, though Eritrea denied the allegations as a fabrication by the U.S., which is an ally of Ethiopia, according to the BBC.

Pineau covered Eritrea for CNN in 1999 and 2000 during the height of its war with Ethiopia. She was planning a film and book project on development in Eritrea when she came to the GMU School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution as an affiliate.

When the school suggested taking students to help with her project, Pineau quickly agreed and collaborated with SCAR Center for Narrative and Conflict Resolution founder and professor Dr. Sara Cobb to design a study abroad program.

Pineau says the course gave students a unique opportunity to observe a country that is not only in the process of development, but has opted for an almost entirely local and state-led approach instead of depending on foreign aid or intervention.

“This is a country that owns its own development,” Pineau said. “There’s no one else in Africa that’s like that, and what is amazing is that, with 20 years of isolation, conflict, nine years of sanctions, no U.S. AID, no World Bank, and yet they are meeting the [U.N.] Sustainable Development Goals…That’s something to learn from, and that was really the objective of the trip.”

Developed in 2012 and made effective in 2016, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals set targets for combating global issues, such as climate change, poverty, and inequality, by 2030.

Pineau wanted to give students enrolled in the study abroad program an all-encompassing view of Eritrea.

In addition to talking to government leaders in the country’s capital of Asmara, participants visited health clinics, schools, farms, and economic development project sites. They met with everyone from ministers and former revolutionaries to writers, farmers, youth groups, and women’s groups.

For Gbenga Dasylva, a doctoral student in the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution who is studying peace building and sustainable development, one of the most memorable parts of the trip was the chance to observe Martyr’s Day on June 20, which commemorates the people who died during Eritrea’s 30-year struggle for independence from Ethiopia.

As part of the Martyr’s Day celebrations, students listened to speeches, joined a candlelight procession, and watched as residents decorated a local graveyard. They also visited a “Tank Graveyard” where many of the military vehicles used during the war still stand.

Every family in Eritrea knows someone who died during the conflict, according to Pineau.

Dasylva says Martyr’s Day plays a central role in Eritrea’s national identity, which emphasizes the individual’s responsibility to the collective in honor of the sacrifices made to establish the country.

Eritrea conscripts all adults into national service, a commitment that was originally mandatory for 18 months but has been indefinite since the border war with Ethiopia broke out in 1998, but the government also provides tuition-free education from first grade through college.

Dasylva argues that some of the criticism of Eritrea reflects ideological differences between Africa and the West.

“The reason why I feel Eritrea is portrayed in the negative is because of the naivety of the Western understanding about the African culture,” Dasylva said. “…The country that has spent so much in sending you to school from the first grade through to the university, and you are not asked to pay a dime, and all the country’s asking is give back to your country.”

Dasylva’s perspective on Eritrea is shaped by his experience growing up in Nigeria.

The International Monetary Fund ranked Nigeria’s economy as the largest in Africa in its 2018 World Economic Outlook report, and the country has held regular elections since transitioning from military to civilian rule in 1999.

Yet, Dasylva says people in his homeland still struggle with poverty, limited infrastructure, and other needs even as the country receives billions of dollars in foreign investment from organizations like the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

“I can boldly tell you that the development steps and processes that I have seen in Eritrea, Nigeria is not close,” Dasylva said. “Nigeria, with so much money and multimillionaires and private jets, is not close. If you cannot guarantee the basic human needs to an average citizen in your country, you have nothing to boast about when it comes to development.”

Fellow student Friderike Butler observes in a report for the Eyewitness Eritrea project that the GMU School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution is putting together to document the study abroad trip that Eritrea found “a special place” in her heart even as “uncomfortable facts” remain a challenge to reconcile with the country’s positive development efforts.

“The country and its people defy many stereotypes of developing poor nations,” Butler, who describes herself as a German American entrepreneur, notes. “…Stories brim of promising opportunities, hopeful dreams, utopian concepts, restrictions of individual freedom, and the potential to solve global challenges.”

Mason could potentially repeat the study abroad trip to Eritrea next year, and Pineau praised the university’s willingness to take a chance on a program that would not have been possible even a year ago.

“I think that just speaks volumes about how innovative they are,” Pineau said. “…The students themselves were just so open and so willing to learn and not come with preconceived notions, but to come and say, we want to hear about it. We want to learn, and that was really wonderful.”

http://www.fairfaxtimes.com/articles/do ... user-share

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 09:05
Eritrea high schools are repressed

Aug 11, 2019  

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the center of the government’s efforts to control the population, a human rights organization charged on Friday.

In a new report, “They Are Making us Into Slaves, Not Educating Us: How indefinite conscription restricts young people’s rights, access to education,” Human Rights Watch alleged that the education system subjects both students and teachers to forced labor and physical abuse, causing many to flee the country.

The report says the Eritrean government forcibly channels thousands of young people, some still children, each year into military training even before they finish their schooling.

“Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the heart of its repressive system of control over its population,” said Laetitia Bader, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Now that peace with Ethiopia is restored, reforms on human rights, starting with the rights and freedom of the country’s youth, need to follow.”

The report claims that instead of developing a pool of committed, well-trained secondary school teachers, the government conscripts teachers for indefinite service, giving them no choice about whether, what, or where to teach.
There might have been some good things happening but we have not seen you writing about other people's rights,abo keshi? To me personally,it is the most hated.How these dirty people hurt others.Awash need to fight the satanic system not personalities.

Awash
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Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 13:54

YOYO,
You must be kidding. You expect me to believe some "students'" report over the myriads of experts who've studied the tyrannical, authoritarian, brutal and secretive(non-transparent) junta? Get real.
YAY wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 11:29
Dear Awash: Do you know where Eritrea is?
Last edited by Awash on 12 Aug 2019, 16:45, edited 1 time in total.

Awash
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Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 15:08

Eritrea military service

Written by Reuters - 12th Aug 2019

Eritrea is forcing thousands of students and teachers into indefinite national service, driving many into exile and frustrating hopes a peace deal with Ethiopia might end conscription, Human Rights Watch said.

Teenage students are systematically subjected to hard labour at an isolated military camp near the Sudanese border, with many enduring physical abuse, the rights group said in a report.

“Eritrea’s secondary schools are at the heart of its repressive system of control,” Laetitia Bader, report author, said. “Now that peace with Ethiopia is restored, reforms on human rights, starting with the rights and freedom of the country’s youth, needs to follow.”

A government spokesman did not respond to requests for comment from Reuters.

The Horn of Africa country has run a system of universal conscription for more than two decades, with government justifying mandatory national service by invoking a “no peace, no war” stalemate with neighbouring Ethiopia after a border conflict from 1998 to 2000.

The two countries signed a peace deal in July 2018.

Since then, despite expectations among new recruits that conscription would be scaled back, Eritrea has “not made any meaningful changes to national service or to its system of repression,” the HRW said.

Conscription drives thousands, including many unaccompanied children, to leave the country each year. Its population is around five million and the United Nations estimated in late 2018 a further 500,000 Eritreans were refugees.

The HRW report said students, some under 18, are sent to Sawa military camp for their final year of secondary school. Officers sexually abuse female students, food is limited and the year ends with four months of military training, it said.

Graduates are either posted permanently to the military or given vocational training and assigned civilian professions, including teaching, for their working lives on low wages.

An Eritrean refugee said he attended the military camp at 17 and was jailed after trying to leave the country and his assigned job. “There is no escape … unless you flee,” he told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
https://www.defenceweb.co.za/security/h ... y-service/

Tog Wajale
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Tog Wajale » 12 Aug 2019, 17:46

Brother Adwash Son Of Prostitutes Dedebit Woorgach Agga*me Tigriayan Who*re Mother:---- Come Up With Tangible Evidence / Proofs. Hear/ Say Did Not Help The Beggars Theives Rapist Murderers Tigriayan Woyane T.P.L.F Leaders Cadres.

Awash
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Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 18:10

Mujale,
You want video presentation from a totalitarian North Korea of Africa? Eyewitness testimony of your Agame tyrants savagery coupled with physical evidence of torture is enough to convict your tyrants in a court of law. Moron Bojele.
Tog Wajale wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 17:46
Brother Adwash Son Of Prostitutes Dedebit Woorgach Agga*me Tigriayan Who*re Mother:---- Come Up With Tangible Evidence / Proofs. Hear/ Say Did Not Help The Beggars Theives Rapist Murderers Tigriayan Woyane T.P.L.F Leaders Cadres.

Awash
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Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 20:40

Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

tekeba
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Posts: 456
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by tekeba » 12 Aug 2019, 21:58

Asswash, are you aware of that you have mental illness. The bad news is you don't have a family that recognizes and take you to psychiatry facility. you have so much negative thought, OCD, You need Zyprexa, Risperdal, Seroquel if worse Clozapine will be your last resort before you go naked.

Awash
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Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 12 Aug 2019, 23:16


YAY
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Posts: 679
Joined: 21 Aug 2013, 11:51

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by YAY » 13 Aug 2019, 04:24

Dear Deginet: Are you Awash or something close to him?

You frequently pretend to be religious and faithful to God, but you frequently are not kind to other persons, and people-groups. You call them bad names. You are either Awash himself or a good substitute/loyal supporter of Awash. You, Deginet, Awash, and many propagandists who mis-characterize Eritrea as the "North Korea of Africa" have the same perspective, which is different than the rest, for example, the George Mason Students and Carol Pineau, former CNN reporter, etc.

Your team hates the Government of Eritrea because it allegedly hurts people or is a satanic system, because you have heard and read so many accusations on Eritrea's Government. My question is: were each accusation proven true? No. That is the first point.

The second point is that your team divorces the detailed accusations from the Eritrean context of wartime. Two American professors, in their book, GOVERNMENT BY THE PEOPLE, say the following about what a government does in wartime and after:
During time of war the national government has to organize, coordinate, and channel all human and natural resources to the end of destroying the war-making power of the enemy. It then becomes not only proper, but absolutely necessary, to conscript men, requisition property, control prices, encourage scientific studies, allocate resources, maintain the supporting economy, and bolster public morale. And when the fighting ceases, the government must cope with the problems of demobilization and reconversion. After disrupting the national life by converting manpower, materials, and machines to war, it is responsible for achieving the return to peacetime living as smoothly as possible. It must give aid to veterans and correct the many war-caused or war-aggravated maladjustments in the economy, such as housing shortages.
If you fail to grasp this, you may scream but nobody is going to listen to you from the other side. Awash is an ineffective fighter. That is so because his fight is based on "foreign experts" who often manufacture "facts" almost out of thin air, with/without visiting Eritrea---i.e. a propaganda of biased stories, lies, and exaggerations. He repeats them frequently. Take note that he often displays, among other things:

(1) a series of sketches of tied persons produced outside Eritrea, I believe, by a Human Rights Watch agent; you may blame the Government based on only the reasons for punishment and proven facts.
(2) coffins of Lampedusa victims (the boat was not owned, operated, rented, or sunk by Eritrean Government). The Government didn't directly cause the accident.
(3) migrants with marks on their bodies that were not burned by the Eritrean Government;
(4) victims lying down, ready to be decapitated by ISIS, not by Eritrean soldiers; and
(5) migrants, supposedly Eritreans, languishing in various places out of reach of the Eritrean Government. They left Eritrea during "time of war" and the Government was doing what a responsible national government would do, and the migrants ---for one reason or another---chose to escape the war or national service or poverty, or all. Why would anyone blame the Government for the Lampedusa accident and its consequences.

I felt/feel sorry for each one of them, whether they were Eritreans or other nationals. Awash blames the Government for unproven allegations, travels the migrants risked to take, and their sufferings in the hands of forces other than the Government of Eritrea. Blame Eritrea only for proven atrocities it might have committed, then we shall be on one side. From experience, I do not accept the unsubstantiated reports the "experts," whom Awash believes, write.

Please be informed that I am not a Qashi/Qadi of any kind, and I do not pretend to be like a Qashi/Qadi. I like to seek facts and learn wisdom, be fair, be independent, and not judge before hearing two sides of a controversy/dispute. If you have not noticed my fights for others, that means you have not paid enough attention so far.

Do you know Muḥammad ibn ʿAbdullāh ibn ʿAbdul-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim. That is the long name of Prophet Muhammad. I want to share the Prophet's wisdom with you. And he is believed to have said,

1. Kindness is a mark of faith, and whoever has not kindness has not faith.
2. Four things sustain the world:
  • the learning of the wise,
  • the justice of the great,
  • the prayers of the good, and
  • the valor of the brave
I urge you to be kind to others, learn from the wise, use truth to be just, and be brave to submit to good reason.
by Degnet » Yesterday, 11:35 There might have been some good things happening but we have not seen you writing about other people's rights, abo keshi? To me personally, it is the most hated. How these dirty people hurt others. Awash need to fight the satanic system not personalities.
Last edited by YAY on 13 Aug 2019, 04:57, edited 4 times in total.

Awash
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Posts: 25922
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Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 13 Aug 2019, 04:31

Unfiltered Notes: The Insanity Of Jailing The Only Psychiatrist In The Country

By T Stephanos, September 22, 2007

Dr. Fitsum Ghebrenegus was the only psychiatrist in Eritrea until his disappearance in November, 2004. I don't believe the country had one since either. The regime, of course, does not burden itself with legal matters and never bothers to justify any of its actions through a court of law. Since it routinely victimizes all segments of Eritrean society without cause, the best guess is that Dr. Fitsum was jailed for his positive engagement with the youth through his church. The destructive jealousy and violent reaction of the ruling elite to anything it perceives as competition for people's mind share - and that of the youth in particular - is causing irreparable damage to the nation. Its culture of militarism heavily depends on the continued enslavement of youth trapped into forced military service that has no limits.

Dr. Fitsum's efforts and many like his, no matter how noble and how beneficial to the long term health of the nation, must therefore be stopped according to the perverted logic the regime uses to deepen its reign of terror. The unjust and yet unexplained imprisonment of Dr. Fitsum has thus denied the country the services of its only psychiatrist. Given the wanton destruction of Eritrea's social fabric unleashed by this regime, the services of Dr. Fitsum and his profession is actually something the nation, and particularly the ruling elite, could have benefited from.

The disappearance of Dr. Fitsum and the thousands more like him is not just criminal. It is insane as well. But the lunacy extends well beyond the confines of the ruling elite. People who should know better nonchalantly shrug off these massive disappearances. "gele reKiblom kKewn alowo (he must have found something on them)", many say, with disturbing approval of acts of terror that a sane mind and a humane heart would never tolerate.

It appears Eritrea, as a nation, has gone mad. Nothing seems to outrage Eritreans anymore. As one of the poorest countries on the planet, precious resources are squandered to build prisons to lock up innocent and highly productive people. Assuming 5000 prisoners have been locked up for 5 years, Eritrea has been robbed of 25,000 man-years of productivity so far. Include the estimated 10,000 former recruits who fled to Ethiopia and other parts of the world into account and the loss is 10,000 man-years of productivity every year. As big and damaging these numbers are for this small nation, they are perceived to be on the low side.

The loss is exacerbated even more when the remaining productive labor and other resources are diverted to support and finance armed groups of neighboring countries while Eritrea spirals down into the abyss of material, mental and spiritual poverty. What is it going to take for Eritreans to be outraged enough to say NO MORE!? For positive and peaceful change to take place, the the insanity of "gele reKiblom kKewn alowo" has to stop.
https://eritreanprisoners.blogspot.com/ ... Kx9l6ZUYpM

YAY
Member
Posts: 679
Joined: 21 Aug 2013, 11:51

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by YAY » 13 Aug 2019, 04:45

Dear Awash: Do you know why Dr. Fitsum was jailed?

If you know, please tell us. If you don't why is jailing him insanity?
What kind of court of law do you think would normally operate during "time of war"?

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 20:40
Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

Awash
Senior Member+
Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 13 Aug 2019, 09:15

YOYO,
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level. The doctor is jailed for his faith, an orthodox bible study movement known as "tehadiso". Not a crime by any stretch of imagination. Only a savage regime would find that a crime punishable by imprisonment since 2004. Don't give me that "in time of war" crap.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 04:45
Dear Awash: Do you know why Dr. Fitsum was jailed?

If you know, please tell us. If you don't why is jailing him insanity?
What kind of court of law do you think would normally operate during "time of war"?

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 20:40
Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

YAY
Member
Posts: 679
Joined: 21 Aug 2013, 11:51

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by YAY » 13 Aug 2019, 10:04

Dear Awash: Show your evidence that what you claimed is true

There is no trap or "crap" here. I am asking you to show the evidence you can produce that Dr. Fitsum was put to jail because of "TeHadisso". STOP saying
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level.
Show it, now. That is all.

Awash wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 09:15
YOYO,
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level. The doctor is jailed for his faith, an orthodox bible study movement known as "tehadiso". Not a crime by any stretch of imagination. Only a savage regime would find that a crime punishable by imprisonment since 2004. Don't give me that "in time of war" crap.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 04:45
Dear Awash: Do you know why Dr. Fitsum was jailed?

If you know, please tell us. If you don't why is jailing him insanity?
What kind of court of law do you think would normally operate during "time of war"?

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 20:40
Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

Awash
Senior Member+
Posts: 25922
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 00:35

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by Awash » 13 Aug 2019, 11:05

Listen to this joker. The burden of proof is on your tyrants to prove someone's guilt beyond the reasonable doubt in a court of law. It's already been 15 years in one of your tyrants' gulags. Ooops, I forgot; your tyrant's don't even have a constitition. My bad. :lol: :lol: :evil: :evil:
Maybe you should provide the records from your kangaroo court if you even have that.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 10:04
Dear Awash: Show your evidence that what you claimed is true

There is no trap or "crap" here. I am asking you to show the evidence you can produce that Dr. Fitsum was put to jail because of "TeHadisso". STOP saying
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level.
Show it, now. That is all.

Awash wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 09:15
YOYO,
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level. The doctor is jailed for his faith, an orthodox bible study movement known as "tehadiso". Not a crime by any stretch of imagination. Only a savage regime would find that a crime punishable by imprisonment since 2004. Don't give me that "in time of war" crap.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 04:45
Dear Awash: Do you know why Dr. Fitsum was jailed?

If you know, please tell us. If you don't why is jailing him insanity?
What kind of court of law do you think would normally operate during "time of war"?

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 20:40
Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

YAY
Member
Posts: 679
Joined: 21 Aug 2013, 11:51

Re: Eritrea high schools are repressed

Post by YAY » 13 Aug 2019, 12:55

Dear Awash: Whoever claims something is true, (s)he has the burden to prove that it is true

If the Government claims Dr. Fitsum is guilty of a crime, it has the burden of proof for its claims. On the other hand, if Awash claims that Dr. Fitsum was jailed for his activities in the "TeHadisso" or renewal within the Eritrean Orthodox Christian Church under Abune Antonios(?), then, the burden of proof lies on nobody else but Awash. Constitution or no constitution, show your proof please.


ምዕጥዕጥ፡ ፍሕትሕት የልቦን።

Awash wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 11:05
Listen to this joker. The burden of proof is on your tyrants to prove someone's guilt beyond the reasonable doubt in a court of law. It's already been 15 years in one of your tyrants' gulags. Ooops, I forgot; your tyrant's don't even have a constitition. My bad. :lol: :lol: :evil: :evil:
Maybe you should provide the records from your kangaroo court if you even have that.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 10:04
Dear Awash: Show your evidence that what you claimed is true

There is no trap or "crap" here. I am asking you to show the evidence you can produce that Dr. Fitsum was put to jail because of "TeHadisso". STOP saying
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level.
Show it, now. That is all.

Awash wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 09:15
YOYO,
I thought you knew everything about your tyrants doings, enough to defend their savagery at every level. The doctor is jailed for his faith, an orthodox bible study movement known as "tehadiso". Not a crime by any stretch of imagination. Only a savage regime would find that a crime punishable by imprisonment since 2004. Don't give me that "in time of war" crap.
YAY wrote:
13 Aug 2019, 04:45
Dear Awash: Do you know why Dr. Fitsum was jailed?

If you know, please tell us. If you don't why is jailing him insanity?
What kind of court of law do you think would normally operate during "time of war"?

Awash wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 20:40
Dr. Fitsum GebreNgus, the one and only psychiatrist Eritrea has, languishes in higdef gulag since 2004.

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