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Sadacha Macca
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Joined: 22 Feb 2014, 16:46

Raya Oromo history

Post by Sadacha Macca » 25 Jul 2019, 18:08

''The most northerly of these Oromos are the Raya who are also called Azebo. These are not different tribes, they call themselves Raya, but are called Azebo by the Tigrayans probably from the name of the country they occupied. They inhabit the great plain in the east of the plateau which is watered by the Ala and Golima rivers.
Ascending these rivers at the end of the 16th century they dispossessed the Dob'a and inherited their occupation of raiding the caravan routes between Tigray and Shoa. They did not attain the same loose cohesion as the Wallo and Yajju and consequently did not play such a great part in the politics of central Abyssinia as the others.
They were the allies of Ras Kasa against Emperor Tewodros, but when Kasa became the Emperor Yohannes they were included in his campaign for ''religious unification,''; he sent expeditions against them and depopulated parts of their country, in which Tigrayans settled and introduced agriculture.
They started their raids again but were subjected by Menelik, and in the 1935-1926 campaign they helped the Italians as irregulars.

In 1814 when visited by Pearce, they were pagans, and were then converted to Islam as recently as the first half of the 19th century.
They are essentially pastoralists but do a good deal of cultivation, Corbetta being a typical example of an Oromo village of agriculturalists.
They still seak Afaan Oromo, but many understand Tigrinya through the settlement of Tigrayans amongst them.
Their political and social order has been greatly changed since they entered the highlands.
The Gada-system of age-groups and most other characteristic Oromo institutions have gone, though they still elect a war leader (abbogas, formerly the abba dula) whose term of office only endures during the particular raiding expedition for which he is chosen.
All travellers hwo have visited them speak of their ferocity, a reputation which endures to this day.
They have always been the inveterate enemies both of the Afar down in the plains and of the Abyssinians in the hills.
They enjoyed complete independence until the time of Emperor Yohannes, who devastated their country, even after that they continued in their ways, were never completely subdued, and aided the Italians during the war of 1935-1936.

The Yajju live south of the Raya and north of the Wallo, having Aussa to the east, Amhara to the west, and Lasta to the north.
Waldia is the chief town in their region, and others are Mokareet and Merta.''


[Islam in Ethiopia
By J. Spencer Trimingham, pages 192-195]

Degnet
Senior Member+
Posts: 23039
Joined: 16 Feb 2013, 11:48

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Degnet » 25 Jul 2019, 18:10

Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
''The most northerly of these Oromos are the Raya who are also called Azebo. These are not different tribes, they call themselves Raya, but are called Azebo by the Tigrayans probably from the name of the country they occupied. They inhabit the great plain in the east of the plateau which is watered by the Ala and Golima rivers.
Ascending these rivers at the end of the 16th century they dispossessed the Dob'a and inherited their occupation of raiding the caravan routes between Tigray and Shoa. They did not attain the same loose cohesion as the Wallo and Yajju and consequently did not play such a great part in the politics of central Abyssinia as the others.
They were the allies of Ras Kasa against Emperor Tewodros, but when Kasa became the Emperor Yohannes they were included in his campaign for ''religious unification,''; he sent expeditions against them and depopulated parts of their country, in which Tigrayans settled and introduced agriculture.
They started their raids again but were subjected by Menelik, and in the 1935-1926 campaign they helped the Italians as irregulars.

In 1814 when visited by Pearce, they were pagans, and were then converted to Islam as recently as the first half of the 19th century.
They are essentially pastoralists but do a good deal of cultivation, Corbetta being a typical example of an Oromo village of agriculturalists.
They still seak Afaan Oromo, but many understand Tigrinya through the settlement of Tigrayans amongst them.
Their political and social order has been greatly changed since they entered the highlands.
The Gada-system of age-groups and most other characteristic Oromo institutions have gone, though they still elect a war leader (abbogas, formerly the abba dula) whose term of office only endures during the particular raiding expedition for which he is chosen.
All travellers hwo have visited them speak of their ferocity, a reputation which endures to this day.
They have always been the inveterate enemies both of the Afar down in the plains and of the Abyssinians in the hills.
They enjoyed complete independence until the time of Emperor Yohannes, who devastated their country, even after that they continued in their ways, were never completely subdued, and aided the Italians during the war of 1935-1936.

The Yajju live south of the Raya and north of the Wallo, having Aussa to the east, Amhara to the west, and Lasta to the north.
Waldia is the chief town in their region, and others are Mokareet and Merta.''


[Islam in Ethiopia
By J. Spencer Trimingham, pages 192-195]
Gala Azebo,they were just very few

sun
Member
Posts: 4299
Joined: 15 Sep 2013, 16:00

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by sun » 25 Jul 2019, 18:26

Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
''The most northerly of these Oromos are the Raya who are also called Azebo. These are not different tribes, they call themselves Raya, but are called Azebo by the Tigrayans probably from the name of the country they occupied. They inhabit the great plain in the east of the plateau which is watered by the Ala and Golima rivers.
Ascending these rivers at the end of the 16th century they dispossessed the Dob'a and inherited their occupation of raiding the caravan routes between Tigray and Shoa. They did not attain the same loose cohesion as the Wallo and Yajju and consequently did not play such a great part in the politics of central Abyssinia as the others.
They were the allies of Ras Kasa against Emperor Tewodros, but when Kasa became the Emperor Yohannes they were included in his campaign for ''religious unification,''; he sent expeditions against them and depopulated parts of their country, in which Tigrayans settled and introduced agriculture.
They started their raids again but were subjected by Menelik, and in the 1935-1926 campaign they helped the Italians as irregulars.

In 1814 when visited by Pearce, they were pagans
, and were then converted to Islam as recently as the first half of the 19th century.
They are essentially pastoralists but do a good deal of cultivation, Corbetta being a typical example of an Oromo village of agriculturalists.
They still seak Afaan Oromo, but many understand Tigrinya through the settlement of Tigrayans amongst them.
Their political and social order has been greatly changed since they entered the highlands.
The Gada-system of age-groups and most other characteristic Oromo institutions have gone, though they still elect a war leader (abbogas, formerly the abba dula) whose term of office only endures during the particular raiding expedition for which he is chosen.
All travellers hwo have visited them speak of their ferocity, a reputation which endures to this day.
They have always been the inveterate enemies both of the Afar down in the plains and of the Abyssinians in the hills.
They enjoyed complete independence until the time of Emperor Yohannes, who devastated their country, even after that they continued in their ways, were never completely subdued, and aided the Italians during the war of 1935-1936.

The Yajju live south of the Raya and north of the Wallo, having Aussa to the east, Amhara to the west, and Lasta to the north.
Waldia is the chief town in their region, and others are Mokareet and Merta.''


[Islam in Ethiopia
By J. Spencer Trimingham, pages 192-195]
Hmm.... 8)

Instead of saying that they were "pagans" by then can you please explain in detail with out using the word "pagan" as to what were their behaviors, practices and activities on the ground that constituted "paganism" because ignorant and or biased and outsider ferenjis often times call anything and everything as pagan if the practices happens to be different from what they are used to and with which they happen to be familiar before.

Ethoash
Senior Member+
Posts: 21660
Joined: 20 Apr 2013, 20:24

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Ethoash » 25 Jul 2019, 18:47

sun wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:26
Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
Hmm.... 8)

Instead of saying that they were "pagans" by then can you please explain in detail with out using the word "pagan" as to what were their behaviors, practices and activities on the ground that constituted "paganism" because ignorant and or biased and outsider ferenjis often times call anything and everything as pagan if the practices happens to be different from what they are used to and with which they happen to be familiar before.
i did not read what SodMacca, wrote but ur reply is very interesting which Ferenjis call pagan is native region all the rest are imported religion... we should value our own native religion just because white man call it pagan dont throw it away... our forefathers survived our religion so the next generation should kept it and past it to the next one...we should appreciate what we have

i will give u one story..

one whiteman and native meet in burial ground of their relative to pay respect ..

the white man saw the Indian give offering food for the dead .. and joking ask the Indian when the dead man come out to eat...
the native understood the hidden jab and reply when is your dead relative come out to smell the flower ..

now when we go back to our country.. there is a joke

one day one Amhara religious priest make a joke about the oromo how they worship a tree..
then the oromo wonder why this Amhara making fun of my worshiping a living tree and the priest cut down tree and worshiping a dead tree .. he mean the Amhara priest use the dead tree to make a ታቦት

have a nice life...

sun
Member
Posts: 4299
Joined: 15 Sep 2013, 16:00

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by sun » 25 Jul 2019, 19:13

Ethoash wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:47
sun wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:26
Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
Hmm.... 8)

Instead of saying that they were "pagans" by then can you please explain in detail with out using the word "pagan" as to what were their behaviors, practices and activities on the ground that constituted "paganism" because ignorant and or biased and outsider ferenjis often times call anything and everything as pagan if the practices happens to be different from what they are used to and with which they happen to be familiar before.
i did not read what SodMacca, wrote but ur reply is very interesting which Ferenjis call pagan is native region all the rest are imported religion... we should value our own native religion just because white man call it pagan dont throw it away... our forefathers survived our religion so the next generation should kept it and past it to the next one...we should appreciate what we have

i will give u one story..

one whiteman and native meet in burial ground of their relative to pay respect ..

the white man saw the Indian give offering food for the dead .. and joking ask the Indian when the dead man come out to eat...
the native understood the hidden jab and reply when is your dead relative come out to smell the flower ..

now when we go back to our country.. there is a joke

one day one Amhara religious priest make a joke about the oromo how they worship a tree..
then the oromo wonder why this Amhara making fun of my worshiping a living tree and the priest cut down tree and worshiping a dead tree .. he mean the Amhara priest use the dead tree to make a ታቦት

have a nice life...
Thanks for your interesting input. That is also what I had in mind.

"Indigenous people have discovered that Christianity is not inherently Western but universal - 'translatable' into any cultural idiom. ~Nancy P.

Somaliman
Member
Posts: 1353
Joined: 09 Nov 2007, 20:12
Location: Heaven

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Somaliman » 25 Jul 2019, 20:27

Paganism is often ridiculed and even stigmatised on this forum, and I believe this is mainly due to a misconception in relation to the word "paganism", or "pagan"!

Pagan doesn't mean uncultivated wild indigenous people devoid of religion! It simply means "people holding religious beliefs other than those of the main world religions". And whether we admit it or not, every people/ethnic on earth has happened to be pagan at some point in time. But what is rather interesting is to observe the distinctive characteristics, traits, and features of any given pagan society. Just a thought!

Degnet
Senior Member+
Posts: 23039
Joined: 16 Feb 2013, 11:48

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Degnet » 25 Jul 2019, 20:29

Somaliman wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 20:27
Paganism is often ridiculed and even stigmatised on this forum, and I believe this is mainly due to a misconception in relation to the word "paganism", or "pagan"!

Pagan doesn't mean uncultivated wild indigenous people devoid of religion! It simply means "people holding religious beliefs other than those of the main world religions". And whether we admit it or not, every people/ethnic on earth has happened to be pagan at some point in time. But what is rather interesting is to observe the distinctive characteristics, traits, and features of any given pagan society. Just a thought!
We called the Ronmans pagans before Christianity or the Nord/Vikings who invaded England.But I support you partly,I have seen myself some one from that place who was married to a Christian.He was gentle and hundsome unlike people like Sadacha.The Tigray culture.Raya borders Enderta,another lion.

Sadacha Macca
Member+
Posts: 9979
Joined: 22 Feb 2014, 16:46

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Sadacha Macca » 25 Jul 2019, 21:06

sun wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:26
Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
''The most northerly of these Oromos are the Raya who are also called Azebo. These are not different tribes, they call themselves Raya, but are called Azebo by the Tigrayans probably from the name of the country they occupied. They inhabit the great plain in the east of the plateau which is watered by the Ala and Golima rivers.
Ascending these rivers at the end of the 16th century they dispossessed the Dob'a and inherited their occupation of raiding the caravan routes between Tigray and Shoa. They did not attain the same loose cohesion as the Wallo and Yajju and consequently did not play such a great part in the politics of central Abyssinia as the others.
They were the allies of Ras Kasa against Emperor Tewodros, but when Kasa became the Emperor Yohannes they were included in his campaign for ''religious unification,''; he sent expeditions against them and depopulated parts of their country, in which Tigrayans settled and introduced agriculture.
They started their raids again but were subjected by Menelik, and in the 1935-1926 campaign they helped the Italians as irregulars.

In 1814 when visited by Pearce, they were pagans
, and were then converted to Islam as recently as the first half of the 19th century.
They are essentially pastoralists but do a good deal of cultivation, Corbetta being a typical example of an Oromo village of agriculturalists.
They still seak Afaan Oromo, but many understand Tigrinya through the settlement of Tigrayans amongst them.
Their political and social order has been greatly changed since they entered the highlands.
The Gada-system of age-groups and most other characteristic Oromo institutions have gone, though they still elect a war leader (abbogas, formerly the abba dula) whose term of office only endures during the particular raiding expedition for which he is chosen.
All travellers hwo have visited them speak of their ferocity, a reputation which endures to this day.
They have always been the inveterate enemies both of the Afar down in the plains and of the Abyssinians in the hills.
They enjoyed complete independence until the time of Emperor Yohannes, who devastated their country, even after that they continued in their ways, were never completely subdued, and aided the Italians during the war of 1935-1936.

The Yajju live south of the Raya and north of the Wallo, having Aussa to the east, Amhara to the west, and Lasta to the north.
Waldia is the chief town in their region, and others are Mokareet and Merta.''


[Islam in Ethiopia
By J. Spencer Trimingham, pages 192-195]
Hmm.... 8)

Instead of saying that they were "pagans" by then can you please explain in detail with out using the word "pagan" as to what were their behaviors, practices and activities on the ground that constituted "paganism" because ignorant and or biased and outsider ferenjis often times call anything and everything as pagan if the practices happens to be different from what they are used to and with which they happen to be familiar before.
Dear Obbo Sun the enlightened one;

I simply pasted what this author wrote sir, it does not mean I agree with him using that word.
Faranji's perspective is not to be taken as the word of god, of course, neither is the word of the hateful abyssinian monks such as bahrey.



hayyee,
nagattii.

Marc
Member
Posts: 215
Joined: 27 Jun 2017, 01:52

Re: Raya Oromo history

Post by Marc » 26 Jul 2019, 09:33

Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 21:06
sun wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:26
Sadacha Macca wrote:
25 Jul 2019, 18:08
''The most northerly of these Oromos are the Raya who are also called Azebo. These are not different tribes, they call themselves Raya, but are called Azebo by the Tigrayans probably from the name of the country they occupied. They inhabit the great plain in the east of the plateau which is watered by the Ala and Golima rivers.
Ascending these rivers at the end of the 16th century they dispossessed the Dob'a and inherited their occupation of raiding the caravan routes between Tigray and Shoa. They did not attain the same loose cohesion as the Wallo and Yajju and consequently did not play such a great part in the politics of central Abyssinia as the others.
They were the allies of Ras Kasa against Emperor Tewodros, but when Kasa became the Emperor Yohannes they were included in his campaign for ''religious unification,''; he sent expeditions against them and depopulated parts of their country, in which Tigrayans settled and introduced agriculture.
They started their raids again but were subjected by Menelik, and in the 1935-1926 campaign they helped the Italians as irregulars.

In 1814 when visited by Pearce, they were pagans
, and were then converted to Islam as recently as the first half of the 19th century.
They are essentially pastoralists but do a good deal of cultivation, Corbetta being a typical example of an Oromo village of agriculturalists.
They still seak Afaan Oromo, but many understand Tigrinya through the settlement of Tigrayans amongst them.
Their political and social order has been greatly changed since they entered the highlands.
The Gada-system of age-groups and most other characteristic Oromo institutions have gone, though they still elect a war leader (abbogas, formerly the abba dula) whose term of office only endures during the particular raiding expedition for which he is chosen.
All travellers hwo have visited them speak of their ferocity, a reputation which endures to this day.
They have always been the inveterate enemies both of the Afar down in the plains and of the Abyssinians in the hills.
They enjoyed complete independence until the time of Emperor Yohannes, who devastated their country, even after that they continued in their ways, were never completely subdued, and aided the Italians during the war of 1935-1936.

The Yajju live south of the Raya and north of the Wallo, having Aussa to the east, Amhara to the west, and Lasta to the north.
Waldia is the chief town in their region, and others are Mokareet and Merta.''


[Islam in Ethiopia
By J. Spencer Trimingham, pages 192-195]
Hmm.... 8)

Instead of saying that they were "pagans" by then can you please explain in detail with out using the word "pagan" as to what were their behaviors, practices and activities on the ground that constituted "paganism" because ignorant and or biased and outsider ferenjis often times call anything and everything as pagan if the practices happens to be different from what they are used to and with which they happen to be familiar before.
Dear Obbo Sun the enlightened one;

I simply pasted what this author wrote sir, it does not mean I agree with him using that word.
Faranji's perspective is not to be taken as the word of god, of course, neither is the word of the hateful abyssinian monks such as bahrey.



hayyee,
nagattii.
They are no different than other Amharas, for they speak Amharic at birth. Slight cultural difference exists but that difference is much more significant if you compare them with Oromos from Wollega than Amharas from Wollo. Oromo's Mogassa tradition is criminal expansionist that subdue and force others to convert and forget their identity. Such tradition was a taboo, never allowed in Amhara and Tigre supremacy

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