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yaballo
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Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by yaballo » 05 Jun 2019, 18:54

Ethiopia’s Economic Miracle Is an Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed.

By Christelle Gérand. May 1, 2019


photo: a local man walking across dry land where the fast-drying up Lake Abiata used to be ...


photo2: Lake Haramaya (before).


photo3: completely dry Lake Haramaya (today).



Around Ethiopia’s Lake Abijatta the ground crunches beneath you, and it becomes impossible to approach the lake’s pink flamingos without the risk of it cracking completely. More than half of the lake has disappeared in the past 30 years, leaving a vast expanse of salt flats. Satellite images collected by researcher Debelle Jebessa Wako reveal that from 1973 to 2006, its surface area shrank from 76 to 34 square miles. Its depth dropped from 43 to 23 feet between 1970 and 1989, and fish have disappeared because of the remaining water’s increased salinity. The other lakes in the central part of the Great Rift Valley (Ziway, Shalla, and Langano) face the same threat.

The core problem is Ethiopian-style development, the downside of the economic miracle vaunted by prominent economists. The World Bank praised Ethiopia’s double-digit growth from 2005 to 2015, mostly due to expanding agriculture, construction, and services. Ethiopia, a landlocked state, is doing all it can to attract foreign investors, with water and electricity almost free and rents at 10 percent of market rate, especially in the textile sector. The rural population and the environment are the biggest losers.

The town of Ziway, near Lake Abijatta and about 125 miles south of the capital, Addis Ababa, is thriving, thanks to dynamic primary industries. France’s Castel Group, the second-largest producer of beer and soft drinks in Africa, has established vineyards, and the Dutch multinational Afriflora Sher has set up the world’s largest rose farm, employing 1,500 workers, who earn $83 a month. These companies pay nothing for water from the Bulbula river, which flows into Lake Abijatta. Local farmers have installed an estimated 5,000 to 6,000 illegal pumps that consume even more water.

Since 1970, when Abijatta-Shalla National Park was created, the water table has officially been protected. The 342-square-mile park, once all acacia forest, includes both lakes and the 70,000 people who live there and graze their cattle within the protected area. Some boost their income by selling charcoal made from felled trees, which can lead to a five-year prison sentence, though checks are rare; the park wardens have only two vehicles, so patrols are minimal. Thieves remove truckloads of sand from the park to sell to the construction industry. Park director Banki Budamo said, “Two years ago, a warden was killed trying to stop these thieves. Seven others have been seriously injured.” Antelopes and Ethiopian wolves are gone from the park, and so are migratory birds.

‘We’re trying to be diplomatic’

Budamo’s 63 wardens are trying new tactics. Warden Amane Gemachu, in her military fatigues, plays with village children and converses with the elders. “We’re trying to be diplomatic and sensitize people,” she said. When she was hired five years ago, the lake was more than half a mile wider, she said. She blames the Abijatta-Shalla Soda Ash Share Company (ASSASC), which makes bicarbonate of soda and uses water from Lake Abijatta. She insisted the company, 45 percent owned by the Ethiopian state, is also responsible for the disappearance of fish because of chemical discharges. Berhane Amedie, ASSASC’s director, assured me that it does not use any chemicals.

At the company’s headquarters in Addis Ababa, he introduced me to Worku Shirefaw, the engineer responsible for the construction of a factory that will use water from Lake Shalla. “The Abijatta factory is a pilot project. The plan was always to build another, bigger one. Lake Shalla is much deeper and so less prone to evaporation,” Amedie said. The company aims to increase production from the current 3,000 tons a year to 200,000 tons, possibly even 1 million. “We’re expecting to make $150 million a year.” Bicarbonate of soda is used in the manufacture of glass bottles, for cleaning products, and by local tanneries. The size of the new factory will enable it to export, mainly to Asia, which will generate foreign currency.

Ethiopia imports five times as much as it exports—$15.59 billion compared with $3.23 billion in 2017—and it needs foreign currency. Dollar-based loans can take up to a year to be approved, during which time businesses are unable to import materials or equipment. So the government encourages export-oriented investment. That is why Shirefaw is unfazed by a government report that concluded that the new factory was “not recommended on environmental grounds.” He said construction will begin within a year and production within four to five years.

Five-year development and transformation plans encourage horticulture although it, too, is heavily water dependent. Ethiopia’s first rose farm was established in 2000, and the country quickly became Africa’s second-largest rose exporter, after Kenya. Michel van den Bogaard, Afriflora Sher’s finance director, said, “In 2005 the government sought us out in Kenya. We had a good reputation.” The company’s appeal was mainly due to its charitable projects. In Ziway it has funded a hospital and schools and pays the wage bills. “When we arrived, we pumped water from Lake Ziway, but we’ve reduced our consumption by half since then by using computer-controlled drip irrigation, water recycling, and rainwater collection. It rains as much in Ethiopia as it does in Holland, but here it all falls in three months.”

‘Water is being pumped 46 kilometers’

Two million people depend on Lake Ziway, the region’s only freshwater lake, but its level is falling relentlessly. Biologist Kathleen Reaugh Flower is worried that the lake may stop flowing into the Bulbula, which feeds Lake Abijatta. Near Harar, more than 300 miles east of the capital, commercial khat growing (its leaves, chewed as a stimulant, are exported throughout the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula), the Harar Brewery, and overgrazing contributed to the drying out of Lake Alemaya in 2011; cactus now grows where there used to be a lake with a 10-mile circumference. Lake Ziway’s water quality is deteriorating, driving treatment costs up. Amdemichael Mulugeta of the NGO Wetlands International said, “At this rate, the water won’t be drinkable in a decade, and the lake will be gone in 50 to 70 years. The town of Ziway used to use lake water, which needed minimal treatment. Now purification would be too complex to be done locally and, above all, too costly. So water is being pumped to the town from 46 kilometers [29 miles] away.”

In its eagerness for foreign investment, the government is selling off local-farmers’ land. From 2016 to 2018, huge protests against this led to the resignation of Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn. International delight at economic growth has led to indulgent treatment of Ethiopia’s authoritarian regime. Human-rights infringements and poor welfare indicators have been overlooked, especially the poverty rate, which is very high and constantly underestimated. The government’s statistics agency sets the threshold for extreme poverty at 19.7 birr a day ($0.70), significantly below the World Bank’s $1.90.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, in office since April 2018, symbolically called a halt to the previous government’s system of favoritism. He canceled a number of public contracts awarded to the Metals and Engineering Corporation, a military-run conglomerate of 98 companies, 26 of whose leaders are being prosecuted for corruption.

For the lakes in the Ziway area, a slow change has started. Mulugeta said, “We used to be permitted to visit enterprises only rarely, especially horticultural ones. Their directors would always tell us they knew so-and-so. Now they have to get round the negotiating table.” International Wetlands is supervising a study to determine how much water can be taken from the Bulbula without adversely affecting the level of Lake Abijatta. Once that is known, the NGO plans to allocate amounts to users in the area and charge them for what they use. It is also helping small farmers of very limited means improve agricultural techniques in order to avoid penalizing them. The Dutch foreign ministry is funding this nearly 500-acre pilot project as compensation for the damage done by big agricultural enterprises. Afriflora Sher is reducing its reliance on pesticide by using insects imported from Europe to prey on red-spider mites that attack rose bushes.


SOURCE: Christelle GérandChristelle Gérand is a journalist based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

https://www.thenation.com/article/ethio ... -abijatta/


photo4: Machines stand on the construction site of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam in Guba, northwestern Ethiopia. (AP / Gioia Forster).

Ethoash
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 05 Jun 2019, 20:07

Dr. Ebola

if u see the two picture of Lake Haramaya in the background the mountain before it have frost after deforestation the lake is gone .. i can see human settlement too.. the major problem is cutting the tree... people cut the tree for many reason to cook their food, or to build their house both case we have alternative biogas and mud brick you dont need wood to build ur house ...mud brick will do..

second we need storage for rain water ... i am not taking about jerry can or barrel.. i am talking about earth to collect all the rain water .. to recharge under ground water what u need is grass, tree to slow the rain water then rain water will have time to seeping down from the land surface in to the ground and recharge underground water if this happened we will avoid Soil salinity...

those farmer who use water pump should use solar water pump to pump their water .. it save on gas and help the environment... not only that they have to swatch to drip irrigation... this alone it will save 70% of the water they might use...

now the factory and the farmer also must also plant native tree and grass to help with recharge underground water

the factory also must recycle water and use also drip irrigation... even tax holiday should be given to build recycling system

another important thing to do is called check dam .. small dam constricted on river will help to slow the river water and will have time to seep in in to underground ...

the second important thing to understand soil erosion, top soil from mountain side if doesn't have protection of tree or grass they will be eroded by rain water and the silt will fill up the Lake Haramaya and it dry it up that is what happened to stop top soil erosion from mountain area we plant tree and grass ...

we do this there is hope the Lake Haramaya will recover .. by the way we get flood because we dont have the rain water to be stored Lake Haramaya dry up so the water become flood this mean it have more power to take away more top soil from mountain area more damage hence the farmer and local people can be proactive and plant tree to start with grass

the sad thing is because of environmental reason government might stop giving permission for new industry which is sad because lose of employment hence this is very important to get it right ...

A. check dam
B.plant native grass and tree
c. recycle water
D. use solar water pump
E. bio gas stop using wood for cooking
F. drip irrigation
G. use brick instead of wood to build ur house
H. introduce cattle ranching..... if we want grass we need cow manure as natural fertilizer

Ethoash
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 06 Jun 2019, 12:05

where is this idiot ebola guys



Stone Lines................. first understand how it work











Ethoash
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 06 Jun 2019, 12:23

this is for dry area like afar

it is called sand dam



Sand dams are a simple, low-cost and low-maintenance, replicable rainwater harvesting technology. They provide a clean, local water supply for domestic and farming use and are suited to semi-arid areas of the world.



A sand dam is a reinforced concrete wall (or a similarly robust and impermeable weir) built 1–5 metres high across a seasonal sand river.

When it rains the dam captures soil laden water behind it – the sand in the water sinks to the bottom, whilst the silt remains suspended in the water.

Research on Kenyan dams shows that only 1 to 3% of rainwater is retained behind any individual dam, the remainder continues its natural flow towards the ocean.[1] Eventually the dams fill with sand - sometimes after only one rainfall or over 1 – 3 seasons. 25 to 40% of the volume of the sand held is actually water.

A mature sand dam can store millions of litres of water – refilling after each rainfall providing a year round supply of clean water to over 1,000 peopl


https://thewaterproject.org/sand-dams



kibramlak
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by kibramlak » 06 Jun 2019, 22:43

The lake haramaya / alemaya case is a strong case how nature is changing in less than two decades. The one it was crossed by boat is now looks like a football field.

Ethoash
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 07 Jun 2019, 07:31

kibramlak wrote:
06 Jun 2019, 22:43
The lake haramaya / alemaya case is a strong case how nature is changing in less than two decades. The one it was crossed by boat is now looks like a football field.


kibramlak

in the above photo the fisherman are in the Middle of the lake and look the depth .... not even cover their ankle.... the question is what happened ..

i will give u one experiment take one bowl and fill it half with water ... send u can use any thing but let say use sand and start pouring sand on this bowl .. the bowl water rise .... for those who dont know that u put sand they think the water is full ... now if u keep on pouring the sand the bowl cant hold the water no more so it would be displaced by sand and there will be no water ..

the same thing happened to lake haramayaa...top soil erosion fill up the lake for so many years the water is displaced and we see football field instead of lake ... in harar we have win storm this also the root cause is top soil erosion.... now the question is how u fight back

simple plant grass and plant

yaballo
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by yaballo » 07 Jun 2019, 08:44

Ethoash & Kibramlak;

All the problems that led to the severe crisis affecting almost all lakes in Ethiopia are nearly all man-made, not environmental/natural.

Wanton & massive environmental vandalism before & during woyane's 27-years rule has accelerated the collapse of the natural balance that sustained the lakes, rivers, marshes, water wells, etc, all over Ethiopia. The disappearance of Lake Haramaya; the fast shrinking of a series of lakes in the Rift Valley; the 'embotch weed' infestation of Lake Tana, Lake Abaya+Chamo, Lake Koka, etc; are all the net effects of careless use of natural resources in the name of unsustainable 'industrialisation'.

In the case of Lake Haramaya, the silly idea of building 'Harar Brewery', for which waster had to be pumped from Lake Haramaya, plus the installation of pumps to irrigate some commercial farms killed the beautiful Lake Haramaya. In the case of Lake Tana, the silly idea of using the lake as a hydro dam & building a large canal called 'Tana-Belles' that takes huge quantities of the lake's water to run electric turbines located south of the lake, is also killing Lake Tana slowly but surely. As huge volume of water is taken out of Lake Tana to operate the electric turbines & to irrigate vast sugar cane fields, the volume of water in the lake decreases & the edges of the lake get shallower - which create an deal condition for the thriving of the 'imboch' weed.

Regardless of the failed Tana-Beles sugar-cane plantation south of Lake Tana, the huge quantity of water taken out of the lake continues to flow into the Beles River & joins the Aby River somewhere in Benishangule. The point is that too much water has been pumped out of Lake Tana than the natural amount of water that used to flow out of Lake Tana via the Abay river that also created the once magnificent Tis-Isat falls.

As a result, the Tana-Beles canal project virtually killed-off the once magnificent Tis-Isat falls & turning them into a sad-looking trickle that they are today. If the same environmental vandalism continues, Lake Tana would shrink enormously as well as becoming even a lot shallower. Terrible Africans! :oops:


video: "Haramaya: Voices from a Vanished Lake"



photo: Tis-Isat falls (before)



Tis-Isat falls (today).


Ethoash
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 07 Jun 2019, 10:41

Dr. Ebola

i thought u worried about my mistake u r politician not environmentalist ... number one Tis-Isat falls the value reduce in summer time ... second what u want us to do? dont invest just see watch the river flow and do nothing ? pls suggest your idea ?

here is my suggestion ... put back what u take in... for example if 'Harar Brewery took water from the lake then they have to pay water bill ..if Tana-Beles sugar-cane plantation took water they have to pay water bill this money going to be used to plant tree and grass.

by the way u can manufacture water .... what u do is help the water life cycle



look the ground water and transpiration, transpiration happened from water evaporated from plant ... ground water recharged if we slow down the rain water .. seep in under ground if we cover the land with grass.. how simple is the technology that is why most people doesn't believe in this solution . i suggest watch the video up above i posted

most industry can recycle water or use water water conservation... in sugar cane industry water wasted because they use flood irrigation this must be banned and they should use drip irrigation or other water conservation method this alone will save 70% water usage

as i told u if u put any industry in natural life cycle u can regenerate product out of their by product and they will be self sustenance...

let take sugar cane factory .. their by product could be cattle feed, briquettes to replace charcoal.... burn to produce power

and the Harar Brewery by product also can be feed for cow. and the rest can be turn in to biogas .... all this will help people not to cut tree .. no cutting tree means more water more water means more Harar Brewery and sugar cane ...

i hope u can read this and suggest more alternative instead of telling us end of earth scenario

thanks i am out.................waiting to your reply

yaballo
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by yaballo » 07 Jun 2019, 20:42

Ethoash: yaballo: i thought u worried about my mistake u r politician not environmentalist ... number one Tis-Isat falls the value reduce in summer time ... second what u want us to do? dont invest just see watch the river flow and do nothing ? pls suggest your idea ?
.

Etoash,

Actually, Ethiopia's & Africa's natural environment would serve most Africans better if their awful & thieving ruling elites did not touch the rivers, lakes, forests, mines, etc of Africa! :idea:

Now, I did not argue against the commercial exploitation of the rivers for irrigation or hydro power generation. Rather, I was highlighting what would happen to rivers & lakes when the ecological balance that sustains them &, all the creatures that depend on them, is ignored.

A simple rule of thumb in maintaining the ecological balance of rivers & lakes is not to take/pump out more water than that goes into them via feeder streams that depend on seasonal & erratic tropical rains.

In the case of Ethiopia, it is necessary to note the difference between rivers that flow into the lakes AND rivers that flow out of Ethiopia & enter the seas. It is better NOT TO TOUCH rivers that flow into the lakes & try to use the waters of the rivers that flow towards the seas.

For example, the rift valley lakes are fed by small rivers such as Bulbula river (see map below). Note how Addis-based habesha bureaucrats, who DO NOT CARE OR UNDERSTAND MUCH about the ecological health of land & rivers in Oromia & southern Ethiopia, have been selling large parcels of Oromo land in the rift valley to the so called 'investors' to be used for irrigated flower farms.

Of course, these flower farms are irrigated via huge volumes of water pumped out of a small stream named 'Bulbula river' that feeds a series of rift valley lakes. Worse, these farms are pumping out huge quantities of water from the actual lakes! :evil: This is what is killing the rift valley lakes & there is virtually ZERO benefit to the local Oromo communities! .. That is why many Oromo communities around the rift valley lakes want anything habesha &/or Ethiopia OUT OF THEIR REGION. ... PIS*S OFF! GET LOST! .. CAPITO?

Anyway, it is better to encourage flower & irrigation farms in river basins that flow towards the seas (Abai, Wabe-Shebelle, Ganaalle, Awash, etc) - not in small river basins that feed ecologically fragile lakes [eg. River Bulbula]. OK?

photo: The Bulbula River basin & how it feeds three lakes in the Rift Valley [Shala, Abiata & Ziway].



photo: Bulbula river near Arsi-Nageelle ...



photo: Ethiopians & Somalis are destroying the last remaining natural forests of the Horn of Africa for charcoal production. Somalia & Ethiopia are major exporters of charcoal to oil-rich Arab countries who use charcoal in their traditional coffee & tea drinking rituals. Of course, Arabs have destroyed their own acacia forests & turned their land into stark sandy deserts. :oops: :evil:










dolphin
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by dolphin » 07 Jun 2019, 21:34

ethiopia need to speed the Reforestation and Land restoration Programs

also there is only need for around 25% of the Renewable Water Resources in the rift valley to Irrigate the land suitable for irrigation in that region (awash-rift valley lakes and omo river basin)

yaballo
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Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by yaballo » 07 Jun 2019, 21:53

dolphin;

Meanwhile in Amhara Kilil ...




<<በአስቸኳይ መፍረስ ያለበት ተቋም!
~~~~
የአማራ ደን ኢንተርፕራይዝ ሲቋቋም የክልሉን የደን ሀብት እሴት በመጨመርና ፋብሪካዎችን በመክፈት የስራ እድልም በመፍጠር የበኩሉን ሚና ይጫወታል በሚል ሽፋን ነበር። በተግባር ግን ከዚህ በተቃራኒው በሆነ ሁኔታ የአካባበውንም ሆነ የክልሉን ህዝብም ሳይጠቅም የትግራይ ፋብሪካዎችን ቋት ሲሞላ፣ ሀብቱም በጥቂቶች እጅ እንዲገባና እንዲዘረፍ እየተደረገ ነበር/ ነው፡፡ይህ ደን የአማራ ደን ኢንተርፕራይዝ ደኖችን ይከልላል፣ እየቆረጠ ይሸጣል። የሚሸጠው ለችቡድ [chipwood] ነው። ችቡድ ፋብሪካው ትግራይ ነው ያለው። ደግሞ አስበዉ ፋብሪካው መጋዝኑ እስኪገባ ለአንድ እንጨት 59 ብር ብቻ ወጭ አድርጎ ያደርጋል። ሁለቱ እንጨት አንድ ችቡድ ይሆናል። አንድ ችቡድ ደግሞ ከማይጨው ተጭኖ ወደ ባህርዳር ይመጣልሃል። ስንት እንደሚሸጡልን ታውቃለህ? 460 ብር! እኛው ቆርጠን፣ እኛው አድርሰን… …340 ብር ያተርፉብናል። ይህ እንግዲህ ከ2 እንጨት ነው። የአማራ ደን ኢንተርፕራይዝ የሚባለው ባይኖር የትግራይ ችቡድ ፋብሪካ ይዘጋ ነበር ።
እንግዲህ ብአዴን የአማራን ደን በመሸጥ የሚተዳደር ድርጅት ነው። እንጨት ለቅሞ የሚሸጥ ድርጅት ማለት ብአዴን ነው።
~~~~~~~~
በአሁኑ ሰአት ደግሞ በክልሉ ያሉ በዘመነ ደርግ የለሙ የደን ሃብቶን አውደሞ ጨርሶ ቀሪውንም እያወደመ ያለ ድርጅት ነው። ለአብነትም በቅርንጫፍ ደረጃ ከፍቶ ሲሰራባቸው የነበሩ ጎንደር ቅርንጫፍ፣ ፍኖተሰላም ቅርንጫፍና ወልድያ ቅርንጫፎች የደን ሀብቱን ጨፍጭፈው ጨርሰው ተዘግተዋል፣ ሰራተኞችም(ጨፍስጫፊዎች) ተበትነዋል።

አሁንም ሰራተኛው የእንጀራ ጉዳይ ሆኖበት በነገሩ እየተበሳጨ ያለ ቢሆንም ይህን አሰራር የተቃዋሙ ሰዎችም(ሰራተኞችም) ሆን ተብሎ ከነበሩበት የስራ ቦታ ወደሌላ በመቀየር እንዲሁም እየተባርሩ እየተደረገ ይገኛል፡፡ በተለይም በአሁኑ ሰአት ተቋሙን እየመሩ ያሉት ኃላፊዎች
1, አቶ ቢያድግልኝ ሽፈራው .....ዋና ስ/አስኪያጅ
2, አቶ ምስጋናው ተገኘ...... የኢንዱስትሪ ዘርፍ ም/ ስ/አስኪያጅ
3,. አቶ አለሙ ጠቋሬ..የደንና ደን ውጤቶች ግብይት ልማት
4, አቶ ሞገስ ቢሆነኝ...ፋይናንስና በጀት-
5, አቶ ጸጋ አራጌ....የቦርዱ ሰብሳቢ
5.ዶ/ር ቢረሳው ማህቶት....... የደን ዘርፍ ም/ስ/አስኪያጅ

ለህዝብ እና ለህዝብ ሀብት ቅንጣት የማይጨነቁ ይልቁንም ደን ጨፍጭፈው በመሽጥ የሚያገኙትን ኮሚን የሚያስቡ በመሆናቸው እና ተቋሙ እንደተቋም የአማራን ምድር ምድረ በዳ ከማድረግ ያለፍ ቅንጣት ጥቅም ስለሌዉ አጠቃላይ የክልሉ የደን ሀብት ወደ ምድረ በዳነት ከመቀየሩ በፊት ሀይ ሊባልና ትልቅ የሆነ የሁሉም ርብርበ ይጠይቃል።

#ልሣነ_ዐማራ
See Translation>>


photo: chipwood used in gardening [mulching], etc ...


dolphin wrote:
07 Jun 2019, 21:34
ethiopia need to speed the Reforestation and Land restoration Programs

also there is only need for around 25% of the Renewable Water Resources in the rift valley to Irrigate the land suitable for irrigation in that region (awash-rift valley lakes and omo river basin)

Ethoash
Senior Member+
Posts: 21377
Joined: 20 Apr 2013, 20:24

Re: Environmental Tragedy: Ethiopia’s rivers and lakes are now drying up at terrifying speed. (Le Monde & The Nation)

Post by Ethoash » 08 Jun 2019, 10:21

ችቡድ ፋብሪካው ትግራይ ነው ያለው። ደግሞ አስበዉ ፋብሪካው መጋዝኑ እስኪገባ ለአንድ እንጨት 59 ብር ብቻ ወጭ አድርጎ ያደርጋል። ሁለቱ እንጨት አንድ ችቡድ ይሆናል። አንድ ችቡድ ደግሞ ከማይጨው ተጭኖ ወደ ባህርዳር ይመጣልሃል። ስንት እንደሚሸጡልን ታውቃለህ? 460 ብር! እኛው ቆርጠን፣ እኛው አድርሰን… …340 ብር ያተርፉብናል። ይህ እንግዲህ ከ2 እንጨት ነው። የአማራ ደን ኢንተርፕራይዝ የሚባለው ባይኖር የትግራይ ችቡድ ፋብሪካ ይዘጋ ነበር ።
this is what i call buda mentality, when oromo export orange fruit and import orange juice no problem .. exporting oil seed and importing edible oil no problem .. if those buda Amhara had exported wood to Chine for 59 birr and import China made chip-wood and pay for it 460 birr they would not mind.. now the Golden did it they cry.. who stop them from doing what the golden did.. not now but when Amhara was in power .. no problem Golden will get their wood from Gambella and other willing trader... let see if the Amhara will established their own chipwood factory beside do they have hydro power they dont so what is the point ...

about cutting wooooooooooooooooooooooooooood that can be solved by introducing electric stove ... today Ethiopia start making electric stove big time ... the old one use Tungsten filament burner today they start using element

do u know Burner Element made in Ethiopia that means we can improved the stove to Western Standard . if there is a demand... this demand increased if the government spend money to educate people the benefit of not cutting wood and using the electric stove ..



about flower farm pumping water out of river ... number one flower farm make us billion of dollar export earning .. so flower farm is so important for our economy.. if u want them leave your region make my day other region will take them.. you there is such thing as growing pain.. this flower farmer must be profitable since they r the first comer you cant charge them everything getting them water for free is not bad the only thing is they have to use it fair use ...they should not abuse it.. now when the second flower farm come u tell them ur rule and the water price ... that is how u develop your economy not by shutting down everything .

as i told u u can manufacture water , and u can manufacture tree .. read how you going to recycle the water and the tree.. when ever u cut one if u plant 100 i dont see any problem using the wood to what ever industry you want... in Canada and USA the soft paper you r enjoying and wasting it away like nothing made out of wood .. so how in hell the Canada alone supply all the wood for almost 100 years.. the answer is replanting 100 time for one tree u cut down ... the have commercial wood that cover the whole French land in size

by the way u cant tell people to stop cutting wood that is their livelihood, but u can stop this demand by switching to electric stove and other source of energy .. such as biogas, solar power or sun stove ...



this sun stove is like gas burning stove u can fry u can do anything

but there are less efficient stove that u can make at home

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