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Zmeselo
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Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Zmeselo » 08 Jan 2019, 09:46



Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan as they set up office in Istanbul

https://www.nordicmonitor.com/2019/01/e ... -istanbul/

7 hours ago



The Eritrean Ulama’a League (Rabita-i Ulama Eritriye), a Muslim organization that is seen as close to the Muslim Brotherhood, opened an office in Istanbul on Jan. 5, 2019.

The inauguration was attended by Yasin Aktay, chief advisor to ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) leader and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, as keynote speaker.



The Eritrean Ulama’a League is supported by the Erdogan government, which has been pursuing a global campaign to woo various Muslim groups including the Muslim Brotherhood and Jamaat-e-Islami.

Among the guests were Abdul-Hamid al-Ani, director of information at the Association of Muslim Scholars in Iraq (AMSI).

In February 2017 Sheikh Burhan Said, president of the Eritrean Ulama’a League, came to Istanbul and visited the Foundation for Human Rights and Freedoms and Humanitarian Relief (IHH), a charity group that has been identified as an arms smuggler to jihadist groups in Libya and Syria and was previously reported by Russia to the United Nations Security Council for links to the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).


Sheikh Burhan Said, the president of Eritrean Ulama’a League visited headquarters of the Foundation for Human Rights and Freedoms and Humanitarian Relief (IHH) in Istanbul, Turkey.

The IHH, backed by the Turkish government, works closely with Turkish intelligence agency the National Intelligence Organization (MIT).

In a televised interview last year, Erdogan aide Aktay advocated a caliphate vision for Turkey, calling the Muslim Brotherhood and Jamaat-e-Islami Turkey’s soft power proxies.

Aktay was deputy chairman of the ruling AKP responsible for managing the AKP’s foreign relations and served as party spokesperson. He is known to be an influential figure in shaping Erdogan government policies in the Arab and Muslim worlds.






Abdul-Hamid al-Ani, director of information at the Association of Muslim Scholars in Iraq (AMSI), attended the event.

Nordic Monitor is a news web site and tracking site that is run by the Stockholm-based Nordic Research and Monitoring Network. It covers religious, ideological and ethnic extremist movements and radical groups, with a special focus on Turkey.

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Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Zmeselo » 08 Jan 2019, 10:06

Ethiopians, should watch out too. Turkey planning to invest in Tgray, to the tune of $3 billion.



Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Zmeselo » 08 Jan 2019, 10:47




A member of the Muslim Brotherhood during Egypt’s Freedom and Justice Party convention. Lilian Wagdy, CC BY

Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?

Terje Ostebo, University of Florida

https://theconversation.com/is-the-musl ... tion-73576

March 9, 2017

The Trump administration https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/worl ... .html?_r=0 as well as Republican lawmakers https://www.cruz.senate.gov/?p=press_release&id=2953 are seeking to introduce legislation that would designate the Muslim Brotherhood a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO).

Many are questioning http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/featur ... 17237.html this move. The fact is that the Muslim Brotherhood has not been directly involved in any violent terror attacks https://www.brookings.edu/blog/markaz/2 ... anization/ in recent decades.

I have been studying Islam and politics over many years, and have learned that this is a highly complex phenomenon. Given its informal character and the diffuse nature of its organization, labeling the Muslim Brotherhood a foreign terrorist organization is not as simple as it seems.

To understand the Muslim Brotherhood, we need to first know how it is structured, and what it represents ideologically.

The different groups

The Muslim Brotherhood exists both in the form of local organizations (in Egypt, Jordan and so on) and in the form of an international organization. The international Muslim Brotherhood has, however, little influence http://foreignpolicy.com/2010/09/21/the ... otherhood/ over any of the local organizations. http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9780230100695

The point is that the term “Muslim Brotherhood” represents a broader ideological trend. There are numerous organizations and groups across the Muslim world that to a varying degree associate themselves with this current.

Some of them use the name of the Muslim Brotherhood, while others operate under different labels. One example is the National Islamic Front https://www.cmi.no/publications/file/31 ... nt-nif.pdf (NIF), that was established in the 1960 as the Sudanese Islamic Charter Front.


Muslims perform Eid al-Adha prayers in Khartoum. Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

There are also a number of informal groups, such as the Ethiopian Intellectualist Movement, http://noref.no/Regions/Africa/Publicat ... ion-Report that rather selectively find inspiration from the Muslim Brotherhood’s thinkers without appropriating the entirety of the Muslim Brotherhood’s ideology.

None of these groups could be characterized as branches http://foreignpolicy.com/2010/09/21/the ... otherhood/ of one unified Muslim Brotherhood. There does not exist any worldwide hierarchical structure. Nor are there any formal links between any of these organizations.

Most of them have produced independent thinkers and developed ideological profiles that focus more on local issues. http://www.sunypress.edu/p-3300-the-man ... activ.aspx All this makes it difficult to speak about a coherent Muslim Brotherhood ideology.

The origins and spread of the Brotherhood

The original Muslim Brotherhood was established in 1928 by Hassan al-Banna, http://www.biography.com/people/hassan-al-banna-9198013 an Egyptian schoolteacher. Its initial activities were concentrated in the town of Ismailiyah, in northeastern Egypt. However, due to al-Banna’s charismatic personality and skills as a community organizer, the group grew rapidly into a mass organization https://global.oup.com/academic/product ... us&lang=en& throughout Egypt.


Brotherhood members and Salafists praying in Tahrir Square, Cairo. Alisdare Hickson

It is important to note that the Muslim Brotherhood was not a political movement in the beginning. Instead, it was devoted to education and social work. It was also focused on enhancing religious piety among Muslims and countering Western influences during the colonial period by building an Islamic identity. http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com ... 8-00101003

Joining the opposition to the British colonizers, the Muslim Brotherhood leadership reluctantly decided to participate in Egypt’s parliamentary elections in the 1940s. Its anti-colonial attitudes also led the organization to support the coup in 1952 which eventually brought Gamal Abdel Nasser http://www.oupcanada.com/catalog/9780195069358.html to power as president.

However, the Muslim Brotherhood’s strong popular support soon led to an open conflict with Nasser, who responded by suppressing https://www.jstor.org/stable/30069528?s ... b_contents it. In addition to filling up Egyptian prisons, Nasser’s policy produced thousands of refugees who became instrumental in spreading the movement’s ideas across the Muslim world.

Ideological diversity

While the Muslim Brotherhood’s initial political engagement was within a democratic framework, a more militant and anti-democratic substream gradually emerged within the movement.

The key figure here was Sayyid Qutb, https://global.oup.com/academic/product ... us&lang=en& an Egyptian writer and thinker, who wrote the seminal book “Milestones.” https://www.kalamullah.com/Books/Milest ... dition.pdf

He claimed that contemporary secular politics was reminiscent of the pre-Islamic “Jahiliyyah” (age of ignorance), and moreover, that “Hakmiyyah” (God’s sovereignty) could be restored only through armed struggle.

His teaching later inspired groups such as al-Qaida, and caused serious frictions within the Egyptian Brotherhood.

The main leadership made significant efforts to renounce the use of violence and to portray the Muslim Brotherhood as a moderate reformist movement. https://www.routledge.com/The-Muslim-Br ... 4172%22%22 This was evident in the Muslim Brotherhood’s struggle to participate in Egypt’s electoral politics. The authoritarian Egyptian regimes, however, blocked it from gaining much influence. Not until Mohamed Morsi became president of Egypt in 2012 did the Muslim Brotherhood ascend to power. That victory proved, however, to be short-lived. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/523085/summary

Globally too the Muslim Brotherhood has been similarly ideologically diverse. For example, some local Muslim Brotherhood-associated organizations, such as those in Kuwait http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9780312238438 and Morocco, http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9948.html were initially influenced by Sayyid Qubt’s thinking. Later, however, they gradually abandoned such ideas. Others developed relatively pragmatic political programs.

The Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan, http://www.jstor.org/stable/4329086?seq ... b_contents for example, did not challenge the local political authorities and developed rather cordial relationship with the Jordanian monarchy.

Islam and democracy

Ideologically, the Muslim Brotherhood as a current has commonly been categorized under the heading of “Islamism.” This ideology emphasizes control over the state https://www.routledge.com/Islam-and-Pol ... 0415782579 as crucial for Islamization of state and society. There are different opinions, https://www.routledge.com/The-Muslim-Br ... 0415664172 however, about what this means.

Various groups and individuals associated with the Muslim Brotherhood have over the last decades been engaged in elaborate discussions about their views on democracy and secularism.

However, there is still some ambiguity around certain issues. One part of this relates to the way the vast majority of Muslim Brotherhood organizations embrace Shari’a, http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9948.html or the Islamic law, as foundational for political and constitutional frameworks.


Muslim Brotherhood women. Gaynor Barton

This relates to tensions between the belief in Shari’a as a divinely ordained authority and the acceptance of the popular will. Some tensions, for example, relate to the question whether Islamists would accept the outcome of a democratic election that does not necessarily correspond with their interpretation of Shari'a. Others are related to whether the Islamists would recognize the freedom of citizens to make individual choices in a state governed according to the Shari'a. Also, would they accommodate the rights of women and religious minorities?

The current situation

So what does this mean in assessing the current situation of the Muslim Brotherhood?

The Arab Spring, http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-12813859 a 2011 democratic uprising that quickly spread in the Arab world, was viewed by many Muslim Brotherhood-associated groups as a moment to put their ideological programs into political action.

However, regional instability across the Middle East, political violence (in Libya and Syria) and the return of an authoritative regime in Egypt shattered such hopes. The political takeover by Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/01/world/afr ... ast-facts/ as the new president of Egypt in 2014 and the subsequent banning http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-28722935 of the Muslim Brotherhood seriously weakened the organization.

In Turkey, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian rule https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... 0A48134189 further blocked debates around Islam and politics. Developments in North Africa have added to the setbacks. The post-Islamist Tunisian Ennadha Party, for example, has been losing in national elections.

All this has exacerbated tensions over the future of the Muslim Brotherhood. https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/up ... _final.pdf These developments have created a space for the emergence of more militant groups such as the Islamic State, although one should be careful not to draw explicit causal links.

Indeed, designating the Muslim Brotherhood as a Foreign Terrorist Organization could have the effect of limiting the opportunities for those Muslims who are attracted by the Muslim Brotherhood’s moderate agenda to engage in politics.

It could even accelerate recruitment to terrorist outfits – a possibility that the Trump administration might seek to take into account.

Terje Ostebo
Director of the Center for Global Islamic Studies and associate professor in the Department of Religion and the Center for African Studies, University of Florida
Last edited by Zmeselo on 08 Jan 2019, 11:14, edited 1 time in total.

Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Zmeselo » 08 Jan 2019, 10:53

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Weyane.is.dead
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Weyane.is.dead » 08 Jan 2019, 11:00

Pig erdogan is a madman dreaming to revive the ottman empire. The Syrians and kurds alone will chase [deleted] Turkish terrorists. Will be done before he gets any where near us. Same goes for the insignificant aljazeera sized country.

Temt
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Temt » 08 Jan 2019, 11:04

The Eritrean people sincerely believe the coexistence with our Ethiopian brothers and sisters as a non-negotiable reality. Because of that Stallworth conviction, they have always tried to differentiate between the people and its regimes. Their fight has never been against the people but against the regimes who apparently could not look any further than the shadow of their own nose.
For the RECORD, the unflinching stand of PIA and EPLF on united Ethiopia and its documented humanitarian policy towards Ethiopian POW in light to the childish statement made by Shaleqa Dawit recently.


Last edited by Temt on 08 Jan 2019, 11:52, edited 2 times in total.

tarik
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by tarik » 08 Jan 2019, 11:18

It's z muslims leaders in sudan that r destroying sudan. Any fanatic christian or jew or muslim, should not lead a country. ALL RELIGIONS R MENTAL DISEASES!!! 2 come 2 turkey, Turkey is economically dead, over 350,000 educated and rich turks left turkey in just 2 years, thanks to Erodogan z fanatic Usmanic empire rule want 2 bring back in turkey., DOn't forget it was turkey that destroyed a muslim syria as well. IF U WANT 2 CATCH Z REAL CRIMINAL THEN FOLLOW Z MONEY IT WILL ALL TAKE U BACK 2 Tiny but rich QATAR!!!

eden
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by eden » 08 Jan 2019, 11:27

will Eritrea religious extremism boost Agazian movement?

Weyane.is.dead
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Weyane.is.dead » 08 Jan 2019, 11:32

Fxck the agazian. Nothing will save you vermin weyane. Death to tplf and their jihadi terrorists friends.
eden wrote:
08 Jan 2019, 11:27
will Eritrea religious extremism boost Agazian movement?

Fed_Up
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Fed_Up » 08 Jan 2019, 11:33

Muslims brotherhood eyes is to build mosques inside Axum. Three billions dollars are talking loud. We will see how the people of ሌቦች will handle this situation. Time will tell. The shirtam kerenait hay day is coming to Tigray.

Degnet
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Degnet » 08 Jan 2019, 11:56

Zmeselo wrote:
08 Jan 2019, 10:06
Ethiopians, should watch out too. Turkey planning to invest in Tgray, to the tune of $3 billion.

The present government will be happy because they want us away from the Eritreans and our own intellectuals.We are facing a terrible sitiuation.It is the 1000 years rule of Jesus or the devil.I am so happy,people like Gurreza with his accursed name are under ground/under the dust.
ye enersu ema teren ke eruk yekerenal/Romeo ena Julliet/Germachew Teklehawariat.


Telomerase
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Telomerase » 08 Jan 2019, 12:48

Zmeselo,

How do you think Eritrea will fend for itself ? The relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia will have nothing to do with this. Ethiopia is democratic. The moslem community in Ethiopia, will not have that issue. People who think they are fighting for their God fight hard. Turkey was the reason ISIS couldn't be controlled even by Superpowers. If the government of Eritrea does not give power to the people, our worst days are ahead. Ethiopia will do what is right for its people as it is doing now. Call that exhibit number 1.

Zmeselo
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Zmeselo » 08 Jan 2019, 13:01

Telomerase,

the question is rather; how is Dr Abyi gonna handle a killil, that makes deals with other States without the approval of the Federal Govt?

As for Eritrea, every Eritrean knows, that we know how to deal with these people. Since Osama in Sudan, time. So, I don't worry much.

Eritrean muslims are very progressive & patriotic, except for some imported jeberti.

As for democracy?

Yes, we need democracy.

What kind?

Not the Western kind, anyway.


Telomerase
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Telomerase » 08 Jan 2019, 13:20

Zmeselo,

Ethiopia has ethnically divided community that is going to take time deal with. Democratic strategies will take care of that. Eritrea had unified people when Osama was in Sudan. Osama was a terrorist who aimed to take down the most powerful country in the world. Obviously, he failed. Now, there are a half million moslem Eritreans who are ready and willing for Turkey to farm from. Over confidence in a system that deprives power from the people is nothing but self deceit. Look at the over confident weyanes ? Where are they now ? BTW, let us not belittle the Jebertys...ethnic cleanization endangers our sovereignity.


Temt
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Re: Eritrean Muslims courted by Erdogan, as they set up office in Istanbul.

Post by Temt » 08 Jan 2019, 13:38

Telomerase wrote:
08 Jan 2019, 13:20
Zmeselo,

Ethiopia has ethnically divided community that is going to take time deal with. Democratic strategies will take care of that. Eritrea had unified people when Osama was in Sudan. Osama was a terrorist who aimed to take down the most powerful country in the world. Obviously, he failed. Now, there are a half million moslem Eritreans who are ready and willing for Turkey to farm from. Over confidence in a system that deprives power from the people is nothing but self deceit. Look at the over confident weyanes ? Where are they now ? BTW, let us not belittle the Jebertys...ethnic cleanization endangers our sovereignity.
Just STFU! What has democracy or lack of it has to do with Islamic fundamentalism? As Zmeselo stated above, our Eritrean Muslim community are just as patriotic as the rest of Eritreans. Their only desire is for their country to be governed by a transparent and a government that is fair to all its citizens. Democracy? Well, it depends what one means. "Democracy" to one may not be necessarily "Democracy" to others. Although it has nothing to do with what you are suggesting, we all expect to be governed fully by the will of our people, not that of pretenders and others.

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