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sarcasm
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The Ethiopian civil war that destroyed Tigray’s economy (Ethiopia Insight)

Post by sarcasm » 17 May 2022, 08:41

The Ethiopian civil war that destroyed Tigray’s economy
16 April, 2022by Ethiopia Insight


Abiy, Amhara elites, and Isaias were keen on reducing Tigray’s economic power in their military misadventure.

Sixteen months into the conflict in northern Ethiopia, Tigray lies in ruins. Almost every aspect of the region’s social, cultural, economic, and infrastructural assets has been damaged.

After federal forces retreated from the regional capital in July 2021, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed indicated that the so-called “law-enforcement operation” was designed to reduce Tigray’s power by diminishing Mekelle’s economic stature.

He stated: “It [Mekelle] is not at this time any different from Abiy-Adi, Sheraro, or Beshasha. It is no longer a center with any power as it now stands…Based on the reality now, when it is seen militarily, it has nothing. There is nothing that makes it a center or which makes it appealing to us, as it was when we first went there.”

his quote seemingly implies that a reduction of Tigray’s economic power was a core objective of the federal government’s military intervention.

Economic war
Even before the conflict between the federal and Tigray governments, de facto economic sanctions had already been imposed on Tigray.

Since 2018, roads to the region through Amhara were blocked by locals and Fano militias. When considering the fact that Amhara and pan-Ethiopian media had been calling for it, the claim that unruly locals were responsible doesn’t hold water.

Although neither the federal nor Amhara governments sanctioned the embargo, the fact that they never condemned it, let alone resolved it, implied that they were complicit. Consequently, for more than a year and a half before the war, the only consistently open route to Tigray was through Afar.

As federal-regional tensions escalated, the former started enacting more constraints.

For instance, in December 2019, a Chinese business delegation from Shanxi province, which had sought to travel to Tigray, was denied permission by federal authorities.


The Ethiopian blueprint for a limitless war on Tigrayans
By Mistir Sew
Even more resolute actions aimed at economically crippling Tigray were taken after its government carried out a regional election in contravention of federal authority.

In mid-October 2020, Tigray’s government accused Addis Abeba of obstructing efforts to control the locust infestation in the region.

At that time, the de facto siege preventing access to food and other commodities was further consolidated. More importantly, the House of Federation (HoF) announced plans to end federal budget subsidy for Tigray’s executive and instead decided to directly fund wereda and kebele adminstrations. Even funds allocated for social welfare were not spared as the federal government suspended a donor-funded safety net program.

On 4 November 2020, the Ethiopian government announced a military offensive in response to attempts by Tigray’s government and Tigrayan military officers to neutralize the powerful Northern Command of the Ethiopian army in Tigray. After three weeks, Tigray’s forces were driven into the mountains of central Tigray and Ethiopian forces took control of Mekelle.

Although some of the major business institutions, like Welkait Sugar Factory and Tekeze Dam, were damaged as the result of air raids during the three weeks of conventional war, most infrastructure destruction took place after Mekelle was captured.


Data shows siege and destruction of health system are causing preventable deaths in Tigray
by Hagos Godefay
Among other acts of vandalism, reports of Ethiopian and Eritrean forces looting and destroying major factories in the region emerged soon after Abiy announced the end of military operations in Tigray.

For instance, Goda Bottle and Glass Share Company were destroyed on 2 December, a week after the capture of Mekelle.

Addis Pharmaceutical Factory, which previously covered 70 percent of national demand, was looted and destroyed on 19 December. What’s more, the Eritrean and Ethiopian forces responsible for the looting killed 16 civilians who tried to stop them.

By the end of December, the looting and destruction of Almeda Textile Factory on 26 December at the hands of Eritrean soldiers was confirmed. Heavy trucks belonging to Mesobo Cement Factory were also reportedly taken outside of Tigray, several of which were spotted in Addis Abeba.

Similarly, 179 trucks owned by Trans Ethiopia P.L.C. were handed over to the Ethiopian government after a prolonged standoff with drivers who were determined not to relinquish them.

According to Tigrayan sources, Eritrean and Amhara fighters looted nearly all businesses and shops located in central Tigray, particularly in Hawzen, Tembien, Wukro, Agbe, and Abi

Continue reading https://www.ethiopia-insight.com/2022/0 ... s-economy/

euroland
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Posts: 4084
Joined: 08 Jun 2018, 12:42

Re: The Ethiopian civil war that destroyed Tigray’s economy (Ethiopia Insight)

Post by euroland » 17 May 2022, 09:14

Wedi junta eden
What exactly is “Tigray economy”? Can you enlighten us? :lol: :lol: :lol:
Aide wheat handouts or stealing from other regions ain’t considered “economy”. Your Chigar Kilil never had an economy except running your Chigar kilil on looting.

sarcasm wrote:
17 May 2022, 08:41
The Ethiopian civil war that destroyed Tigray’s economy
16 April, 2022by Ethiopia Insight


Abiy, Amhara elites, and Isaias were keen on reducing Tigray’s economic power in their military misadventure.

Sixteen months into the conflict in northern Ethiopia, Tigray lies in ruins. Almost every aspect of the region’s social, cultural, economic, and infrastructural assets has been damaged.

After federal forces retreated from the regional capital in July 2021, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed indicated that the so-called “law-enforcement operation” was designed to reduce Tigray’s power by diminishing Mekelle’s economic stature.

He stated: “It [Mekelle] is not at this time any different from Abiy-Adi, Sheraro, or Beshasha. It is no longer a center with any power as it now stands…Based on the reality now, when it is seen militarily, it has nothing. There is nothing that makes it a center or which makes it appealing to us, as it was when we first went there.”

his quote seemingly implies that a reduction of Tigray’s economic power was a core objective of the federal government’s military intervention.

Economic war
Even before the conflict between the federal and Tigray governments, de facto economic sanctions had already been imposed on Tigray.

Since 2018, roads to the region through Amhara were blocked by locals and Fano militias. When considering the fact that Amhara and pan-Ethiopian media had been calling for it, the claim that unruly locals were responsible doesn’t hold water.

Although neither the federal nor Amhara governments sanctioned the embargo, the fact that they never condemned it, let alone resolved it, implied that they were complicit. Consequently, for more than a year and a half before the war, the only consistently open route to Tigray was through Afar.

As federal-regional tensions escalated, the former started enacting more constraints.

For instance, in December 2019, a Chinese business delegation from Shanxi province, which had sought to travel to Tigray, was denied permission by federal authorities.


The Ethiopian blueprint for a limitless war on Tigrayans
By Mistir Sew
Even more resolute actions aimed at economically crippling Tigray were taken after its government carried out a regional election in contravention of federal authority.

In mid-October 2020, Tigray’s government accused Addis Abeba of obstructing efforts to control the locust infestation in the region.

At that time, the de facto siege preventing access to food and other commodities was further consolidated. More importantly, the House of Federation (HoF) announced plans to end federal budget subsidy for Tigray’s executive and instead decided to directly fund wereda and kebele adminstrations. Even funds allocated for social welfare were not spared as the federal government suspended a donor-funded safety net program.

On 4 November 2020, the Ethiopian government announced a military offensive in response to attempts by Tigray’s government and Tigrayan military officers to neutralize the powerful Northern Command of the Ethiopian army in Tigray. After three weeks, Tigray’s forces were driven into the mountains of central Tigray and Ethiopian forces took control of Mekelle.

Although some of the major business institutions, like Welkait Sugar Factory and Tekeze Dam, were damaged as the result of air raids during the three weeks of conventional war, most infrastructure destruction took place after Mekelle was captured.


Data shows siege and destruction of health system are causing preventable deaths in Tigray
by Hagos Godefay
Among other acts of vandalism, reports of Ethiopian and Eritrean forces looting and destroying major factories in the region emerged soon after Abiy announced the end of military operations in Tigray.

For instance, Goda Bottle and Glass Share Company were destroyed on 2 December, a week after the capture of Mekelle.

Addis Pharmaceutical Factory, which previously covered 70 percent of national demand, was looted and destroyed on 19 December. What’s more, the Eritrean and Ethiopian forces responsible for the looting killed 16 civilians who tried to stop them.

By the end of December, the looting and destruction of Almeda Textile Factory on 26 December at the hands of Eritrean soldiers was confirmed. Heavy trucks belonging to Mesobo Cement Factory were also reportedly taken outside of Tigray, several of which were spotted in Addis Abeba.

Similarly, 179 trucks owned by Trans Ethiopia P.L.C. were handed over to the Ethiopian government after a prolonged standoff with drivers who were determined not to relinquish them.

According to Tigrayan sources, Eritrean and Amhara fighters looted nearly all businesses and shops located in central Tigray, particularly in Hawzen, Tembien, Wukro, Agbe, and Abi

Continue reading https://www.ethiopia-insight.com/2022/0 ... s-economy/

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