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Ethiopian church housing the Ten Commandments has leaking roof

Postby Beli » 08 Dec 2011, 03:27


By Rick Dewsbury, MailOnline

A very British problem of a leaky church roof could be about to give the world the chance to glimpse the legendary Ark of the Covenant.

That's because the claimed home of the iconic relic - a small chapel in Ethiopia - has sprung a leak and so the Ark could now be on the move.

The Ark - which The Bible says holds God's Ten Commandments given to Moses on Mount Sinai - is said to have been kept in Aksum, in the Chapel of the Tablet, adjacent to St Mary of Zion Church, since the 1960s.

According to the Old Testament, it was first kept in the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem for centuries until a Babylonian invasion in the 6th century BC.

Since then it's been the goal of many adventurers and archaeologists to find it. Most-famously, but also fictitiously, Indiana Jones was shown in the 1981 Steven Spielberg film Raiders of the Lost Ark.

There has also been a long-running claim from the Orthodox Christians of Ethiopia that they have had the Ark for centuries, and since the 1960s it has apparently been kept in the chapel.

This small and curiously-styled building is surrounded by spiked iron railings, and situated between two churches, the old and new, of St Mary of Zion in central Aksum.

No one has been allowed to see the holy object, described in scripture as being made from acacia wood, plated with gold and topped with two golden angels, except one solitary elderly monk, who must watch over the Ark for the remainder of his life, and is never allowed to leave the chapel grounds.

But now the chapel - which was designed by the Ethiopian leader Emperor Hailie Selassie - has had to be covered in a tarpaulin to stop rain getting in.

The water damage could mean the Ark will be moved for the first time in decades giving religious worshippers and adventurers alike a chance to see it.

British photographer Tim Makins, 54, who is a travel photographer for publications like Lonely Planet, discovered the church had sprung a leak whilst travelling through Ethiopia last September.

He believes the moving of the Ark could be one of the best ways to discover if there's any truth in the claims of the East African state.

Tim said: 'During my most recent visit to the church, I was surprised to see some ground adjacent to the ''Chapel of the Tablet'' being cleared and levelled by workmen, and some quantities of building stone being assembled nearby.

'Asking around, I managed to discover that a new temporary chapel is due to be built, and the Ark is to be moved into it while the original chapel is repaired.

'It seems that the builders of the 1960s were not as careful as the builders of centuries past, and the roof of the chapel has developed some serious leaks that now need comprehensive repair work.

'To protect the Ark, a tarpaulin now covers the roof of the chapel but this is just a temporary measure.

'To renovate the building thoroughly, the roof must be stripped back to the bare bones and so a replacement chapel is to be built next door providing a temporary home for it.'

Tim said the construction of the new temporary chapel would take about three months according to workers and religious figures at the site, though he suspects that it will probably take much longer.

He added: 'When the work is finished, the Ark of the Covenant will be carried to its new resting place.'

'That this can be done by the one person allowed to see it is unlikely, as The Bible describes the size of the Ark as 2.5 cubits in length, 1.5 in breadth, and 1.5 in height.

'Cubits in today's measurements translate to about 1.31 metres x 0.79m x 0.79m and it is normally carried on two long wooden poles.

'If it really is this size, and still contains the two stone tablets that list God's Ten Commandments, then the elderly monk will no doubt need some help to transport it.'



Re: Ethiopian church housing the Ten Commandments has leaking roof

Postby revolutions » 10 Dec 2011, 05:30


The evil woyanes repeatedly using the House of God as a propaganda tool to divert attention from the deteriorating economic, political and social conditions in Ethiopia is the greatest sin of all. They have been caught in many lies before, such as in June of 2009, in response to the rising food prices and out of control inflation in Ethiopia, the so-called "Patriarch" was caught pulling a similar stunt to divert people's attention by announcing that he would reveal the Ark of the Covenant to the public. Nothing happened, but the story made headline news around the globe.



Re: Ethiopian church housing the Ten Commandments has leaking roof

Postby Balcha Demesse » 11 Dec 2011, 16:26


revolutions wrote:The evil woyanes repeatedly using the House of God as a propaganda tool to divert attention from the deteriorating economic, political and social conditions in Ethiopia is the greatest sin of all. They have been caught in many lies before, such as in June of 2009, in response to the rising food prices and out of control inflation in Ethiopia, the so-called "Patriarch" was caught pulling a similar stunt to divert people's attention by announcing that he would reveal the Ark of the Covenant to the public. Nothing happened, but the story made headline news around the globe.


Eritrea's decision to issue its own currency provoked the Ethiopians to declare a classic protectionist policy. All trade between the two countries, which had been paid for in the Ethiopian currency would henceforth be paid for in hard currency. Eritreans naturally interpreted this as punitive measure taken against them for daring to excercise a crucial function of their sovereignty. There is anecdotal evidence that the issuance of the Nakfa was resented not only as a manifestation of Eritrea's will to develop separately from Ethiopia, but also the very choice of Nafka grated feelings. There were unfortunate incidents illustrating such resentment, including refusal by Ethiopian custodians of the Holy Church of Saint Mary of Zion of Axum to contributions of Eritrean Christian pilgrims who offered to pay in Nakfa to the Church.
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Re: Ethiopian church housing the Ten Commandments has leaking roof

Postby BEQA-Meles-BEQA!!! » 12 Dec 2011, 19:01


Everyone knows TPLF only uses the tablet of Ten Commandment for the history of it rather than to protect the historical representation of the article. TPLF was able to bring a murderous cadre "priest" from the field of battle to preside over the religious segment of the Ethiopian society, he has since sold the historical article tablet that has been protested for centuries in the name of making himself a billionaire. It is estimated that the TPLF cadre priest has over $900 mil in his name stashed in offshore bank account.



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