Ethiopian News, Current Affairs and Opinion Forum


<<WEYYANE WILL SOON SPARK A TEFF REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE>> Hoddam FinFinne Residents Cannot Live Without Teff & With Empty Bellies - The Last Straw!!!

Postby confused » 01 Jan 2018, 09:45


By purchasing grain and teff throughout the country to ship to Mekelle....Weyyane will soon create a severe shortage and aggravate the high and escalating cost of food in FinFinne....

Meanwhile, the shortage of flour has compelled weyyane to import the commodity from Pakistan, draining the dangerously low foreign currency reserves...

The high cost of importing flour notwithstanding, weyyane can subsidize the price of imports for consumers.....

However, the increased price of teff by farmers and the greedy GURAGE merchants cannot be subsidized... if forced to sell at a loss GURAGE merchants will hoard the teff ...thereby making matters worse...

The hoddam residents of FinFinne will only revolt if their belly is affected...and can no longer afford to eat the standard one meal a day...

The cost of staple food and discontent has TODAY triggered a revolution in IRAN...

In the last two years, the shortage of flour triggered revolts in CAIRO and Khartoum but quickly averted by government subsidy of imported flour...

Imports can be subsidized....how will weyyane respond to the price increase and shortage of locally produced grains??? Particularly, if Oromo and Amara farmers withhold teff from the market and Oromo protesters prevent transporting of teff to FinFinne .....like they did to JiJiigga...

By stupidly mobilizing and shipping grain to Mekelle to avoid a revolt in Mekelle...weyyane strategists neglected to consider the effect of their actions on the residents of FinFinne.. Filling Mekelle belies at the expenses of FinFinne bellies was unwise!!!

Seemingly, Weyyane has shot TPLF in the foot... the Gurage merchants will do the rest..

Can the hoddam teff addicted residents of FinFinne live without affordable teff??? THE LAST STRAW

Folks, sit back and observe the beginning of the end for weyyane as soon as they deploy the military to kill protesters in FinFinne and try to force Gurage merchants to part with their profits...

FinFinne is the key...to complete the national uprising....

FinFinne University cannot continue to be complacent but must join the other universities and the protests..



Re: <<WEYYANE WILL SOON SPARK A TEFF REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE>> Hoddam FinFinne Residents Cannot Live Without Teff & With Empty Bellies - The Last Straw!!!

Postby confused » 01 Jan 2018, 13:07


#WORLD NEWSDECEMBER 31, 2017 / 12:37 AM / UPDATED 7 MINUTES AGO
Ten killed in Iran protests and security forces repulse attacks: state TV

DUBAI Reuters) - Ten people were killed during protests in Iran on Sunday and armed demonstrators tried to seize police stations and military bases but were repulsed by security forces, state television said on Monday.

he nationwide protests have drawn in tens of thousands of people and represent the boldest challenge to Iran’s leadership since pro-reform unrest in 2009. Calls for more demonstrations on Monday raise the possibility of prolonged instability.

“Some armed protesters tried to take control of some police stations and military bases but they met strong resistance from security forces,” state TV said. It gave no details of what happened and there was no independent confirmation.

State television also said 10 people were killed in several cities on Sunday night and showed footage of damage to property. It did not elaborate.

Iran is a major OPEC oil producer and regional power but frustrations have grown at home while the country is deeply involved in Syria and Iraq as part of a battle for influence with rival Saudi Arabia.

Those foreign interventions are also fuelling anger in the Islamic Republic because Iranians want their leaders to create jobs instead of engaging in costly proxy wars.

Unsigned statements posted on social media urged Iranians to demonstrate again in the capital Tehran and 50 other urban centers.

Demonstrators say they are angry over corruption and economic hardship in a country where youth unemployment reached 28.8 percent last year.

Protests continued overnight even though President Hassan Rouhani appealed for calm. In remarks carried on state TV, he said Iranians had the right to criticize authorities but also warned of a crackdown.

“The government will show no tolerance for those who damage public properties, violate public order and create unrest in the society,” Rouhani said. Hundreds of people have been arrested but security forces have largely shown restraint.

Iran’s leaders believe they can count on support from many of the generation that took part in the 1979 revolution because of their ideological commitment and the economic gains they have made under the government, analysts say.

The unrest erupted in the second city of Mashhad against price rises but it swiftly spread and turned into political rallies.

Some called on Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to step down and chanted against a government they described as thieves.

Demonstrators say they are angry over corruption and economic hardship in a country where youth unemployment reached 28.8 percent last year.

Protests continued overnight even though President Hassan Rouhani appealed for calm. In remarks carried on state TV, he said Iranians had the right to criticize authorities but also warned of a crackdown.

“The government will show no tolerance for those who damage public properties, violate public order and create unrest in the society,” Rouhani said. Hundreds of people have been arrested but security forces have largely shown restraint.

Iran’s leaders believe they can count on support from many of the generation that took part in the 1979 revolution because of their ideological commitment and the economic gains they have made under the government, analysts say.



Re: <<WEYYANE WILL SOON SPARK A TEFF REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE>> Hoddam FinFinne Residents Cannot Live Without Teff & With Empty Bellies - The Last Straw!!!

Postby confused » 01 Jan 2018, 19:39


Iranian President Rouhani calls for unity as death toll rises in unrest
By Eliza Mackintosh and Alanne Orjoux, CNN
Updated 6:01 PM ET, Mon January 1, 2018
Protesters angry over economy, corruption

(CNN)Iranian President Hassan Rouhani tried to downplay the significance of sometimes violent protests across his country that have left 12 people dead in the biggest challenge to the authority of the Tehran regime since mass demonstrations in 2009.

"Our great nation has witnessed a number of similar incidents in the past and has comfortably dealt with them. This is nothing," Rouhani said in a meeting with Iranian members of parliament on Monday. Rouhani has called for calm as his government deals with the widespread spontaneous uprising.

phpBB [video]



Re: <<WEYYANE WILL SOON SPARK A TEFF REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE>> Hoddam FinFinne Residents Cannot Live Without Teff & With Empty Bellies - The Last Straw!!!

Postby confused » 01 Jan 2018, 22:20


THE KEY FOR WEYYANE DEMISE....INJERRA REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE.....

All the teff and shurro is now in Mekelle... The majority of residents in FinFinne can only afford injerra and shurro...tea and bread ....and besso...

According to my relatives...the price of teff and shurro has doubled in the last week....Many people have adapted to eating macaroni and spaghetti....however, the price of of macaroni and spaghetti has also doubled..

Edible oil and sugar are now scarce... and when available beyond the economic means of the majority...

Image
Image



Re: <<WEYYANE WILL SOON SPARK A TEFF REVOLUTION IN FINFINNE>> Hoddam FinFinne Residents Cannot Live Without Teff & With Empty Bellies - The Last Straw!!!

Postby confused » 01 Jan 2018, 23:46


A Revolution Marches on Its Stomach
Which governments are most likely to be toppled when hungry people riot?


http://www.slate.com/news-and-politics/ ... nment.html

By Joshua Keating

People may vote with their pocketbooks, but more often than not, they revolt with their bellies. If you want to predict where political instability, revolution, coups d’etat, or interstate warfare will occur, the best factor to keep an eye on is not GDP, the human development index, or energy prices.

“If I were to pick a single indicator—economic, political, social—that I think will tell us more than any other, it would be the price of grain,” says Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute, who has been writing about the politics and economics of food since the 1950s.

Food, of course, is never the sole driver of instability or uprising. Corruption, a lack of democracy, ethnic tension—these better known factors may be critical—but food is often the difference between an unhappy but quiescent population and one in revolt.

Take Venezuela, where a toxic combination of gas subsidies, currency controls, and hoarding have led to chronic food shortages—a major factor motivating the anti-government protests that have wracked the country since the beginning of this year.

It’s not always high prices that are to blame. Behind the ongoing protests against Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra in Thailand, in addition to concerns over corruption and a debate on the future of the country’s democracy, is a probe over a controversial rice-hoarding scheme that has led to a global glut.

This idea isn’t exactly new. “We’ve known since the times of the Roman poet Juvenal”—he of bread and circuses fame—“that food is an inherently political commodity,” says Cullen Hendrix, a political scientist at the University of Denver’s Korbel School of International Relations and a leading authority on the relationship between food and conflict.

Two events have renewed interest among scholars in the relationship between food prices and political instability. The first was the 2007–08 food crisis, which triggered food riots in countries from Haiti to Bangladesh to Mozambique.

The second was the Arab Spring, the first signs of which were riots in response to high food prices in Algeria and Tunisia. The revolutions that swept the Middle East that year were, of course, primarily the result of a population frustrated by decades of dictatorship and corruption, but according to Hendrix, Egypt’s revolution, in particular, is impossible to fully understand without taking into account the role of food.

Autocratic governments have a habit of keeping food and fuel prices artificially low through subsidies and price controls. As Hendrix puts it, “Rational leaders have an incentive to cater to the preferences of urbanites. They are closer to the center of power, they face lower costs for collective action, they live in dense environments in which protests are particularly threatening to a leader. So what do these urbanites want? They want cheap food.”

If you’re the dictator of a small, rich country, you can theoretically feed your population indefinitely. In 2011, for instance, while revolutions were sweeping the region, oil-rich Kuwait announced that it would commemorate the anniversary of the country’s liberation from Iraq by giving every citizen a grant of 1,000 dinars ($3,545) and free food for 13 months. The message to citizens was pretty clear.

Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and is not blessed with a significant amount of arable land or oil reserves; its rulers don’t have options like Kuwait’s. Egypt has a history of food-based instability. In 1977, under pressure from the World Bank, Anwar Sadat severely curtailed food subsidies. In the resulting “bread intifada,” strikes and rioting lasted for two days and around 800 people were killed.

By 2011, food and fuel subsidies accounted for a staggering 8 percent of Egypt’s GDP. Hosni Mubarak’s government could no longer afford to feed his population into submission. Even with subsidies, grain prices jumped 30 percent in Egypt between 2010 and 2011, and the uprising began in January 2011.

The Arab Spring may become the textbook example of the geopolitics of food prices—the food riots and subsequent revolutions transfixed the world. But shifts in food price may be responsible for an even more profound reordering of global power. Food may explain why everything changed during the 1980s.

After a price shock in the late 1970s, food prices underwent a slump during the early and mid-1980s. A confluence of factors included slowing economic growth; the spread of the “green revolution,” which improved the efficiency of agriculture in developing countries; and the falling price of oil.



Return to Ethiopian News & Opinion

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Dawi, Google [Bot], Horus, minilikze3rd, yaballo